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Eating and drinking while pregnant - are we too paranoid?


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#151 HurryUpAlready

Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:11 PM

Wow, I'm amazed at how many women on here are absolutely PARANOID about the effects certain foods and drinks may have on their unborn child.  Having said that, I am yet to conceive so perhaps my views will change once I'm pregnant.

I would like to think that I will be sensible, without going totally OTT.  If food is fresh I will eat it - whether that be sushi, soft cheeses, ham, chicken or takeaway food.  And during later stages in pregnancy I'm sure I will enjoy a glass of wine here and there.

A friend of mine who has recently had her first baby spent the majority of her pregnancy in London and made a comment about how less judgemental people are over there about pregnant women having a wine now and then.  Being so close to Europe where it is the norm, it's not seen as anything out of the ordinary.  Funny how women all over Europe continue to drink wine throughout their pregnancy and it's not considered dangerous.  Same with women in Japan eating Sushi... if all the women on this blog are correct, I'm amazed that Japan's population has managed to increase at all.  Everyone on here makes it sound like sushi will be the death of your unborn child for sure!  

Having said all of this, if I had had multiple miscarriages in the past then I'm sure my attitudes would change dramatically and I wouldn't have such a relaxed attitude, so to these women, if that's the reason for you being overly careful then fair enough.

Other people just enjoy the drama I think.

#152 HurryUpAlready

Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:18 PM

QUOTE (Firstbub @ 21/02/2010, 01:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If your baby was born and you were holding it in your arms and someone came up and offered you some sushi but said 'there's a very small chance your baby might die if you eat this' would you eat it? And if not then why should that answer be any different when the baby is in your womb?



Hmmmm, I hadn't thought of it like that. Maybe that's what it does feel like when you are pregnant thus choosing to avoid certain foods is an easier decision to make.

#153 kjheather

Posted 24 February 2010 - 04:39 PM

I used to think that women were crazy for giving up their favourite foods and alcohol while pregnant, I am sure I had even rolled my eyes on occasion with the hype around it.

Now I am pregnant there is no way I am taking chances. Although I might not agree with all of Mightymummys sentiments I agree totally with her general opinion on not indulging.

Seriously, it's 40 weeks of not drinking or eating a handful of different types of food. You're not missing out on any nutrients that you can't get elsewhere. As for the car argument - I have to travel to go to work to earn the money to pay the bills that will allow the baby to have somewhere to live and a decent quality of life, which I consider totally different to giving up stuff that I simply DON'T NEED and isn't going to benefit the tiny helpless life that depends on me.

#154 mumsy26

Posted 24 February 2010 - 06:36 PM

QUOTE (Natalie W @ 23/02/2010, 02:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Same with women in Japan eating Sushi...

It's interesting to note that sushi is actually a delicacy in Japan. My sister lived over there for a while with a number of different families and ate less sushi there than she does here at home.

Natalie, I think you will find you may feel a little differently about it when pregnant original.gif

#155 Mrs Tee

Posted 26 February 2010 - 03:29 PM

After a number of miscarriages I'm now happily 'knocked up' with twins so I'm being super-cautious with what I eat and drink.

In saying that, I'll occasionally have a glass of cheer to celebrate (I've had about 5 glasses in 5 months), have one cup of coffee each morning, will eat ricotta if it's cooked and as hot as molten lava, I haven't really touched left-overs at all, and all the delicious things I love - pate, soft cheese, soft serve, sushi, salami, bean sprouts, raw parsley - I'll stuff myself with when I've a babe or two in arms. It's a small price to pay for the joy I experience each time I feel a good kick in the ribs. (Clearly the kicking is a new thing for me. I'm sure I won't be quite so whimsical when I'm full term sad.gif )

I'm using the following link to help me make smart food decisions:

www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/consumers/life-events-and-food/pregnancy/

I hope this site helps you by explaining what's GOOD, BAD and in between.

Bon appetit.

#156 medicalquestions

Posted 28 February 2010 - 08:25 PM

I haven't read all the replys, but I used to be one of these people who said 'it's too over hyped'....although I
tried to eat right and never drunk anything nor did I smoke etc. Then I got pregnant with my second son. He was born full term at only 4lbs12oz...he was skin and bones. He was food and oxygen staved for who knows how long, but if I hadn't got to the hospital after I realised something was wrong (he wasn't moving) he would have died.
Apparently I had an infection in between 25-35 weeks...possibly from something I ate???
He is now severely disabled. Cerebral Palsy, severe epilepsy, Severely delayed, vision impaired..the list goes on.
I think it's worth making sure you eat and drink only healthy food...I mean it's 9 months...that's it - for the sake of both your family and babies quality of life, why risk it????????????????? It annoys me so much when I see mothers smoking and of course drinking - I don't even care if it's 'one' drink. No one wants their child to go through as much as my child has gone through....it's worth taking care of that little bundle of joy - self sacrifice is just part of motherhood!!!!

#157 lylac

Posted 01 March 2010 - 02:44 PM

In my late teens, I had a friend who had a 10 year old brother with severe physical and intellectual disability. His disability was a direct result of his mother contracting Listeria while she was pregnant. My friend often spoke of his mother's guilt and his family's struggle through everyday life. My friend's brother and also his mother have since died.

When my niece was born they found Listeria in her umbilical cord. She is 8 and we now know that she is fine.

Needless to say, through my two children's pregnancy's I followed the rules.

#158 jfl

Posted 01 March 2010 - 04:18 PM

QUOTE
His disability was a direct result of his mother contracting Listeria while she was pregnant.


There is no evidence that listeriosis in the mother causes either physical or intellectual disability in newborns.

#159 KirstenMc

Posted 06 March 2010 - 04:00 PM

My sister has a friend whose baby died shortly after birth last year, as a result of listeria. So yeah, if I wasn't paranoid before that, I would have been after.

But now I've given birth, it's bring on the soft cheese and cold chicken, please!!

#160 zephyrseas

Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:27 PM

nno.gif IT'S NOT TOO "PARANOID" -WE WEAR SEATBELTS TOO!!

It is far better to generally follow tthumbs.gif the cautions and guidlines for the limited time of the pregnancy, and use common sense regarding when and to what extent these are adhered to. Plus if anything does not go perfectly you can at least not feel recriminations about something you did imperfectly regarding things consumed.

Alcohol can be a risk yyes.gif , particularily in higher amounts or even if lesser  quantaties but concentrated forms consumed quickly sick.gif . This would apply through out the pregnancy and no one should pressume that those imbibing like I mentioned had completely unharmed babies as subttle neurological impairments are not obvious. In the first trimester particularily nno2.gif it isn't worth having even small quantaties being the riskiest most sensitive stage, even if contemplating a termination in case it's not gone through with for a range of reasons. In later pregnancy a small sipped glass wink.gif isn't likely to be too harmful if having food with it on the odd occasion. Plus you'd be surprised at the bits of alcohol that can occur in some sweets, fruits, juices as well as continental types of sauces and meat dishes.

One doesn't need to feel that deprived nno2.gif  dry.gif in avoiding the listeria risk list of foods.
original.gif Freshly caught lobsters, yabbies & fish  cooked (fully) promptly as killed  and eaten pronto are safe. As are most tinned versions.
original.gif Freshly made coleslaws and salads from fresh well washed vegetables & using fresh commercial packaged dressing eaten promptly ( aside from an immediate short refrigeration time to have it cooler if preffered) is safe.
original.gif A hard cheese like parmesan from conventional brands is safe enough.
original.gif Cooked at home , cooked thoroughly silverside is too.

ohmy.gif Generally it is deli style, buffets, parties and BBQ's plus other peoples places that might contain the risks. sick.gif
The odds of getting listeria are generally low, but it can happen and can impact more on the pregnant than others. So why shrug.gif chance it if you can avoid it?

Though if you know of others or yourself imbibed such foods in ignorant bliss don't make a fuss over it, remaining relaxed is also important. closedeyes.gif

Sure people in the past ate , drank and were merry grin.gif in their pregnancies seeming to often still have healthy babies bbabyflip.gif , but likewise where their were compromised outcomes cry1.gif from this no one knew shrug.gif what caused these, hence a mild distortion of how the benefits derived via cautious consumption.

It's like wearing a seat belt, most car trips for many years could have been done without them wwhistle.gif , but we wear them for the couple of times ffear.gif they may be needed ( excluding the reasons of legislation & fines)
. ppinkstork.gif  bbluestork.gif  babygirl.gif  babyboy.gif  bbabyflip.gif  bbaby.gif


#161 megalula

Posted 08 March 2010 - 03:00 PM

Oh and another thing I don't like about the histeria is the competition to be the perfect pregnant person it creates between women.

#162 idealbod

Posted 09 March 2010 - 02:39 PM

I went to my ob/gyn today for an 8 week scan (my first scan).   I asked about seafood because I am going to Noosa this week and I don't want to miss out on some fresh seafood if I can help it.  He told me seafood is fine - even raw seafood such as oysters.  He's a professor so I presume (at least one would hope) he knows what he's talking about.  He did say stay clear of the soft cheeses however, and cold meats like salami.  I'm just completely confused by all the advice on the net etc, it does seem to go over the top and whenever you ask someone, they all have a different opinion or answer.  If you ask me all that Macca's, cakes and other junk food probably does the baby much more harm than eating these things in moderation.  But then again, I don't really know do I!

#163 on the contrary

Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:43 AM

Oh how ridiculous!   Much better to have the kid OD on stress hormones than a bit of chicken. huh.gif  I can only hope the kid doesn't suffer from the same anxiety disorder.

Just stop smoking and cut your Gin & Tonics to less than 5 a day and it'll be fine.  Remember a few billion kids survived under much worse conditions.  Read Angela's Ashes.

#164 tracey-anne

Posted 23 August 2012 - 02:17 PM

i think being aware informed and educated are all good things but with that we can also go overboard there doesnt seem to be a happy medium though, i am 34 near 35 and in my fourth pregnancy ,i can honestly give input on this subject but i think its important to always remember that there are n guarantees with any side of this debate you can do the so called right thing during pregnancy and have complications and you can do the absolute wrong and be blessed with no consequences. i was naive and uninformed at20 with my first but did do things that anyone knows is wrong, i often wonder tho is ignorance really bliss? i was a drug addict at the time and used heroin every day smoked cigarettes and marijuana up until i was nearly five months pregnant then (thankfully)was incarcerated and spent the remainder of my pregnancy inside plus a month after giving birth, i was placed on the methadone program to avoid loosing the baby due to going through withdrawals they (doctors) believe its best to be on methadone whilst pregnant rather than risk loosing the baby if you withdraw also but if yr on methadone they can treat the baby for withdrawals if need be once born wheras if your on herion they cant do anything but helplessly let bubs withdraw as they dont know whats in the herion yr using but they know everything about the methadone but i was very very blessed  my boy was born 8 pound 4 ounces and altho he did withdraw they were able to treat it, he is now two months shy of his 14th birthday and has had no problems physucal or mental he is healthy loves his sport is smart (altho doesnt use his brains as much as i would like) but my point is he has no ill effects from what i did during my pregnancy and believe me when i say YES i DO know how lucky and fortunate iam and how selfish i was back then . now i have a 11 month old who i almost did everything right i did smoke  alittle but drug free and didnt eat the wrong foods and didnt drink and altho all seems ok he does have a lazy eye but otherwise seems ok but it was my worst pregnancy with stress and he was born early and very low birth weight he was 5 pound and altho i ate everything i could to put his weight up and just lived so much better than when i was 20 so i was surprised that i had some problems with him when i expected him to be the healthiest ! altho age and other factors play a part i had the rhesus factor so they had to monitor the whole pregnancy and took him out once my blood began attacking him and after he had to have blood transfusion but like i say there just are n guarantees now that im pregnant again im going to be wise and reduce the risks such as eating properly and not drinking drunk and reducing my smoking but i wont be going overboard i wil have the occasional drink i had one drink last week and ive got one drink in the fridge but im going to leave that until i have my first ultrasound which is today i do believe that in yr first trimester perhaps being more careful as this is when everything is being developed but with my experience i know its not necassarily going to guarantee anythimg but as im older and more informed i do worry more and because i know how lucky i have been im very aware that i should appreciate my luck and not abuse it and i also worry that id be punished if i did the wrong thing now considering how fortunate ive been, but i think its gods will or the universe or who knows but i think so much of its out of our hands getting pregnant is such a miracle in itself appreciate it follow yr instincts and dont go overboard and not enjoy yr pregnany but also find that happy medium for you and treat yr body well for you.... good luck to everyone who is expecting and please do not judge me for what ive admitted here as i found this very hard to admit and put it out there i know iam blessed!!

#165 kate65

Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:05 AM

I am currently 30 weeks into my second pregnancy and am living in Europe, first Florence and now Barcelona and I have only been advised to stay away from raw foods and to wash all my fruits and vegetables. My doctor when giving me my food warnings even told me to eat prosciutto cotto (ham) but to avoid the prosciutto crudo (what we know as prosciutto). Unfortunately, though I have had to abstain from all the beautiful cheeses, prosciutto crudo, jamon and smoked salmon that is so widely available in my local market, which takes quite a bit of self-control.

The Europeans also seem to have a more relaxed attitude to having the occasional glass of wine or beer while pregnant, although they are not big drinkers anyway, they have a respect for alcohol that just isn't present in Australia. In fact I am very much showing and waiters have no qualms in asking me if I also want a drink when my husband orders one, but I obviously do not always take up their offer. In a pregnancy diet given to a woman I knew by a doctor in Italy, it advised she actually drink a small glass of red wine with both lunch and dinner (Italian wine is also not as high in alcohol as Australian wines) and an espresso with breakfast.

With my first pregnancy I sat across from a woman in my office who used to judge everything I put in my mouth, and would comment that she "would never risk" the cup of tea or coffee I would have in the mornings, amongst other things. Not only did I grow to resent her, vehemently, I had done a lot of reading up on the matter and I kindly (out loud, I wasn't so kind in my head) advised her that I could make my own decisions. This kind of judgemental attitude helps no one, and unless a woman is blatantly disregarding the health of her unborn child, and herself, then people should keep their mouths shut. Our doctors and nurses do a great job of advising us of the risks and harms that are involved with what we consume during pregnancy.

In other words, what we have been told to be cautious of and when to moderate our behaviour has turned into paranoia which is causing undue stress on many women, and it should be up to each and every woman to decide what is right for her. As long as those choices are based on sufficient evidence, which I think most pregnant women make sure they do.

A final thought on the matter should be that although there is no peer reviewed scientific evidence to prove that enjoying a wine every now and then is not harmful, there is even less proving that it is harmful, and there are lot of extremely healthy people out there, and have been for centuries, whose mothers had a tipple every now and then.

#166 HeartMyBoys

Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:29 AM

My nana told me back in her day, it was the norm to sit around and have a beer or wine while pregnant. Oh, and a smoke. It was never frowned upon like it is now.
These days everything is harmful to a baby, and everything gives you cancer  rolleyes.gif

#167 SophieBear

Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:46 AM

Thanks for bringing this one out again. I haven't read it before and it really has made me calmer about Listeria.

I have had two sips of alcohol since falling pg which sent me on a guilt spiral and had lettuce on my big mac (once) then later found out that the lettuce may have Listeria and again, I stressed and felt guilty about my apparent negligence.

Since researching the 'naughty' list of foods, I have become a little OTT with my food choices. Christmas day is going to prove hard though.

#168 Soontobegran

Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:59 AM

QUOTE (HeartMyBoys @ 21/12/2012, 10:29 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My nana told me back in her day, it was the norm to sit around and have a beer or wine while pregnant. Oh, and a smoke. It was never frowned upon like it is now.
These days everything is harmful to a baby, and everything gives you cancer  rolleyes.gif



I can tell you that we supplied a smoking room in our Maternity Hospital for our patients in the late 70's but it doesn't make it right.
Problem with the "we used to do it and we turned out ok" argument is that it doesn't account for the fact that since that time we have been blessed with research and science that now explains the higher rate of sick babies back in the 'old days'.
If you'd like to live in the days when we didn't know the curse that smoking and alcohol can be to our developing babies then be flippant about today's recommendations but if you are happy to enjoy the fact that the mortality and morbidity of our babies is at an all time low then we should embrace these recommendations to change our behaviour.


#169 steppy

Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:12 AM

I'd probably avoid cold deli meats and soft cheeses, but honestly, lysteria can also be in raw vegetables etc... I dunno. I don't drink much anyway so I probably wouldn't change that habit during pregnancy. I might have a drink if I really felt like it, but I wouldn't be drinking more than once a month if so - same as I do now. I think it's up to each individual how much they want to do in this regard. I don't mind the idea of people avoiding every risk if they want to - just so long as they don't impose their standards on me.

#170 marke

Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:19 PM

After 5 years of trying to conveive we were paraniod about getting our diets right once we finally got pregnant. My wife and I read loads of books and did acupuncture, saw a nutritionists, doctors and other healthcare professionals. We got such mixed messages on what we should and shouldn't eat - it was friggin confusing. The Italians all eat deli meats but don't eat soft cheese when pregnant, my neighbour ate soft cheese as long as it was pasteurised and the Indians must eat hot curry when pregnant so why can't we?  

One of the best books we read was The Bump to Baby Diet but not sure who the author is. Also we Decided to stop asking friends their thoughts as everyone had different opinions which made it confusing. My wife got a great little card from our fish shop which told her which fish she could and couldn't eat. It was business card size so easy to keep in her purse.

#171 marke

Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:35 PM

The author for The Bump to Baby Diet is Kate Marsh and you can win a copy on this facebook page

http://www.facebook.com/pages/n4-food-and-...155626284537424




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