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Kindergarten Reading Levels


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#1 healthytwins

Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:18 PM

Hi

Just wondering what the average reading level is at this stage of the year for a kindergarten child?  My boys are on level 3 and 4.  I help out at school with reading and most of the kids in the boys' class are on level 4 and 5.  I'm a bit worried about my son who is on level 3, as he doesn't seem to be improving on this level?  Does anyone know what level they are supposed to reach by the end of the year?

Thanks

#2 Jazz3

Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:23 PM

In ACT, they are supposed to be on level 5 by the end of Kindergarten.

So 3-4 sounds fine to me for the beginning of term 3.

#3 Ducky*Fuzz

Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:26 PM

In NSW they should be at level 8 (RR Levels) by the end of Kindy.

Some sight word practice will help at this stage, both reading and writing them.  original.gif

#4 mum850

Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:31 PM

In Victoria, level 5 by the end of Prep.


#5 healthytwins

Posted 01 August 2009 - 08:41 AM

Level 8..he's got a fair way to go... mellow.gif

Thanks for your replies ladies.

#6 JRA

Posted 01 August 2009 - 09:05 AM

QUOTE
Level 8..he's got a fair way to go..


Don't worry, once they get started children can go through those levels fairly quickly

#7 blueksy

Posted 01 August 2009 - 08:44 PM

Also, just remember that levels differ between manufacturers.

I think level 3 is pretty good going.  I think its important not to stress about it.  Reading is suppose to be enjoyable - and kids learn at different paces.

I see DS come home with level 3-5 books, but according to him, he is on level 8...  and some kids in his class are level 10 - hmmm...  I will have to ask his teacher what the deal with that original.gif

#8 snowy

Posted 01 August 2009 - 09:24 PM

blueksy, teachers often send home readers that are a few levels lower than the child is working on at school. This gives the children the opportunity to practice their fluency and expression without the challenge of difficult words. It also helps the children's confidence in reading.

My kindy DD in NSW is bring home level 8 readers. I'd like to second one of the PP's  recommendations on sight word practice. It really helps with their reading progress.

Not sure what level they are expected to achieve by the end of the year though.

#9 LiveLife

Posted 02 August 2009 - 06:19 PM

to be honest I feel stupid that I still cant even work out what the reading levels actually are wacko.gif

we have 4 books out from the library at present that are early readers, one is a fitzroy reader #11 (does that mean it is level 11?), another by Sails literacy that is level 2 yellow (so have no idea what that means), a storylands book by Blake education that says level 9 (does that mean it is level 9?), and lastly one from the reading corner series that says is is grade 2 with 2 pink stripes...... I chose these books from the library myself as I thought they were all roughly DD's level but lord only knows what level that actually is????? does your school actually sit your all down and explain it all to you? are you all teachers and thats why you know about these levels?



#10 mum850

Posted 02 August 2009 - 06:42 PM

Livelife, that's why worrying about levels is a waste of time.. really! They are only used in the classroom and nowhere else. Just pick books your DD will like!



#11 JRA

Posted 02 August 2009 - 07:45 PM

QUOTE
I chose these books from the library myself as I thought they were all roughly DD's level but lord only knows what level that actually is????? does your school actually sit your all down and explain it all to you? are you all teachers and thats why you know about these levels?


No. As a parent you don't need to know the levels.

The children bring home take home books that are appropriate for their level. it is not something I need to worry about. the books have already been "grouped" in to levels by teachers etc, and for us each level has a different colour. Generally the level as prescribed by edn dept (or whoever) is written in pencil inside, just so if the label is lost it does not need to be regraded.

When getting from the library the children get books they want/like.

For other reading books we just get books that he can read or not read. If he can't read them, I will read them, but I know he will move up to them. For instance in prep initially there is no way DS was able to read the rascal series he had been given the christmas before he started school. So we read them to him, as he progressed he started reading them himself. This happens with other books, the star wars, zac power etc. As they get more confident they read them

the key is not to stress
QUOTE
does your school actually sit your all down and explain it all to you?


But they do sit all parents down and explain how to read with the children, and how to help them and how to deal with the take home book each night, and that it is important NOT TO STRESS. in the same way children all learn to walk at different ages, they learn to read at different ages.

Edited by JRA, 02 August 2009 - 07:46 PM.


#12 kyrrie

Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:54 PM

Do try not to worry OP.  Just keep reading and make it a special and fun time.  

I'm a great believer that children get reading in their own time and all we can do is give them the tools they need: phonics etc, lots of words and enjoyment.  Then if next year the school offers extra programs like reading recovery, take advantage of them.  You'll find that once both your boys click with reading they will start to fly through the levels.  Just don't worry if it's not tomorrow OK.

Livelife, many of us know nothing about the levels at all (apart from what I've read here).  Our school colour codes.  Parents are still aware of what colours are high although I haven't seen parents being competitive about it.  Occasionally a parent whose kid is doing really well will want to tell me (so it doesn't sound like they are boasting to other parents) but I have no idea of the colours so I just always make appropriate noises.  tongue.gif

Each series seems to have a different grading system.  I did see a comparison chart somewhere so they are out there, but it wouldn't have all series on it obviously.  I always just did a flick through the book looking to see if it was suitable for DD.

#13 mum850

Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:57 PM

cclap.gif
what kyrrie said!


#14 Julie3Girls

Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:24 AM

I agree, level 3 books coming home doesn't mean he is on level 3 readers in class. Home readers are often a couple of levels lower because they are meant to be positive reinforcing, not teaching.

I agree entirely with simply enjoying reading. We do the home reader, and then find something else my daughters want to read - sometimes I read it, sometimes they read it, sometimes we take turns.

So like the other PP, I wouldn't be really worried about the levels. But just to give you a bit of reassurance, I've found that the kids will often stay on a particular level, and they are kind of grouped - like level 4 and 5 books are pretty similar. But then they suddenly to seem to jump up a bit.  From what I've seen at our shcool, level 3 is pretty common at this point - my daughter was at that level a month ago, she is now bringing home level 5 books.

#15 Sal78

Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:56 PM



don't worry too much. it could just be that they haven't been tested for hgher levels yet.

DH is a year 1 teacher. a lot of his kids were only n level 3 or 4 at the start of the year (even the brightest kids) but now they are level 20 and beyond. One boy went from level 3 to level 24.

It's because they haven't been taught to read yet. sight words is just a small part of literacy...its' the whole of literacy inc writing, spelling etc

#16 Bel_J

Posted 03 August 2009 - 11:17 PM

I don't recall being taught to read at all when I was in kindy, so I was impressed that my step son even had a reading program in pre-school.  As long as they get the concept of letters making sounds, and the sounds making up words I don't see how they can go wrong.  They'll get it eventually.

#17 mum850

Posted 04 August 2009 - 07:06 AM

Bel_J, kindy in NSW etc is prep in Vic etc. So the OP is referring to kindy as in the first year of school, not kindy as in pre-school.... confusing, eh?

#18 member21

Posted 05 August 2009 - 03:32 PM

Confused aobut kind reading levels our school in NSW doesn't use number they use things like E1, E2 - how does this relate to level 8 (reached by the end of kindy in NSW)?

any help appreciated.

#19 donthavetv

Posted 05 August 2009 - 03:39 PM

We don't even start reading at our school until Yr 1 and as far as I know, by the time they get to Yr3 our kids are on par with those from other states that start earlier.
Yr 1 for us starts at 6.


#20 rachelwang

Posted 06 August 2009 - 11:08 AM

That is the conversion between two systems I copied from some previous post.  My daughter's school use E1 - CD system as well, that is why I kept them.


E1 - Emergent 1 RR Level 1
E2 - Emergent 2 RR Level 2,3
B1 - Beginning 1 RR Level 4,5
B2 - Beginning 2 RR Level 6,7
B3 - Beginning 3 RR Level 8,9
B4 - Beginning 4 RR Level 10,11
F1 - Fluent 1 RR Level 12,13,14
F2 - Fluent 2 RR Level 15,16,17
F3 - Fluent 3 RR Level 18,19,20
Ext - Extension RR Level 21,22,23
CD - Countdown RR Level 24,25,26

#21 mumto3princesses

Posted 06 August 2009 - 06:33 PM

Oh thanks for that. I was wondering how it compared.

Healthytwins - I have twins in Kindergarten as well. We just had our parent teacher meetings and we were told they would like them to be at the end of B2 or the start of B3 by the end of the year. But then again some kids just don't catch on as quickly and it's not uncommon to have some going into year 1 on B1.

I'm SO glad I put my girls in seperate classes! DD2 is on B2 in class but she likes them to bring home one level below whatever they are on to read at home. She said she was pretty sure if she tested DD2 on B3 and even B4 right now that she would probably be able to go up but she is leaving her as she is for the moment and not rushing her through the books. But DD3 was really struggling and things have only really recently started to click. She has only just gone up to E2 this week.

#22 akabanna

Posted 12 August 2009 - 09:55 PM

QUOTE
like them to be at the end of B2 or the start of B3 by the end of the year.


my DD is prep, and the teacher said about level 6 by the end of the year. so that is on par with B2.

She also said if they test at level 6, then they send home level 4, as the want the home readers to be easy. About two levels below where they are at.

she also said many times that it does not matter what they read, or even if we are reading some of them to them, as long as they are getting into the reading habit.

she said my DD is at about level 6, so I should not worry. (even though she is not that keen on reading since starting school!)

#23 hamiriver

Posted 13 August 2009 - 01:46 PM

OP I may differ here in my opnion. I think you need to talk to the teacher and establish where they would like your child to be at the end of the year. The reader level is also linked to what sight words they are/should be learning.  You dont want this to be a surprise converstaion at the end of the school year that DS isnt where he should be-ie. before they go to grade 1 they may need to understand /read a certain level of instructions to do classwork.

In QLD at Grade 1  we have been told they like the kids to be on level 11 by the end of the year.
My ds could not read a word at the start of the year, but now is reading level 10 books.  They will all of a sudden take off when they get the hang of it. It also comes along with sight word learning etc.

I do agree with pp that at home we dont worry though about reading levels and pick books which he thinks he can read and would enjoy. Those may be a combination of harder and easier books. We do read the 4 school readers he gets from class each week, several times as well.

I wouldnt panic either, but do have a talk to the teacher.

#24 IBM

Posted 23 August 2009 - 01:39 PM

CODE
Livelife, that's why worrying about levels is a waste of time.. really! They are only used in the classroom and nowhere else. Just pick books your DD will like!


This is the best advice you will get. If you son is doing his home readers and working in the classroom then he is learning to read at his own pace. My eldest DD went into school reading just about fluently then my second DD barely knew the sounds letters make when she started. Now my second DD is reading well although for Kinder and Yr 1 she was at the bottom of the class. It just took her a little longer to pick up.

Let you son choose books at the library that interest him even if they are too hard for him to read. If he enjoys looking at the pictures then he is enjoying the book and that is the best thing for him.



#25 BeckaJ

Posted 14 September 2009 - 05:10 PM

Don't feel stupid for not understanding...i am a kindy teacher and also a mum of a kindy son and thought i'd help out. Benchmark for kindy is about level 8 but schools have their own individual marks that they aim to reach as they know the abilities of their students. Also, kids progress quickly once they start to improve so don't panic if your child doesn't meet the benchmark yet. I have taught students who were reading level 3-4 and others who were at 18 in kindy. They all progress at different rates. As for the different books...yes the numbers do indicate the levels but it is PM readers that are used as the benchmarking norm and the ability levels between PM and Fitzroy can differ greatly. Finally, home readers will always be at least 2 levels lower than they are reading at school. Home readers are designed for kids to read independantly whereas their classroom level is an assisted one. Hope this helps a little. original.gif






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