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Do you approve of 'trick or treating'?


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271 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Cali~_*

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:11 PM

Yeah, that time of year, that discussion again.

Dani reckons:
QUOTE
I do despise those miserable scrote mothers that run off the back of "But this is Australia!!


(Halloween thread in Misc, which I don't think she'll mind my quoting)

But I'm one of those "miserable scrote mothers", who thinks it's rude to knock and ask for lollies to strangers.

Fair enough if it's all set up and arranged beforehand and all the target neighbours have been warned and even supplied with lollies to give - but otherwise I think it's just not on to knock and ask for stuff.

Don't really like them stuffing their faces with kilos of cheap coloured sugar either.

Costume party fine, but not door knocking.

What are the "tricks" going to be anyway??

WDYT?

#2 WazzasMissus

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:12 PM

No, I think it's silly and dangerous.  Unless you get those people who do it in their little cul-de-sac or whatever.

#3 Turn left

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:14 PM

NO!  Its an American custom...WE LIVE IN AUSTRALIA!

#4 surprisebaby

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:14 PM

I don't go so far as to say I "disapprove" of it but it is not something we do so this house is lolly free.
If they are lucky they might get an apple.
I have lived in 4 states over the years and have only ever had one trick or treater knock on my door in any case.

#5 sparassidae

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:15 PM

No I don't. For heaps of reasons.

#6 **Xena**

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:15 PM

I wish we did it here  sad.gif If it was more widespread I would have no problem (as long as I was with my children whilst they did it) but I think it is rude when most people here would have no idea that anyone would doorknock them.

I love Halloween though so we still dress up and have a party just no big neighbourhood festivities as well  wink.gif

#7 ~meh~

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:16 PM

my area do it so i let my kids. We mainly go to houses that are decorated with a halloween decoration out the front biggrin.gif

we have an american couple across the road from us who go all out... their house is FANTASTIC!!!

#8 *~*Kitty*~*

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:16 PM

I just don't answer the door.

As long as they don't wake DD or damage any of our property/garden/lawn etc, I don't really care what they do.

#9 lisa25

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:16 PM

Cali - I think you're a bit of a party pooper!  What is dangerous about it?  What is the harm of having a few lollies?  I could just imagine the poor little kids face after dressing up and setting out and then knocking on YOUR door!

QUOTE
but not door knocking.


They're not salespeople - they're little kids having fun!

Edited by lisa25, 29 October 2008 - 01:17 PM.


#10 cb1980

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:17 PM

If people want to have a party at their house and celebrate halloween thats their business

But knocking on other peoples doors is a no go in my books.  Its like forcing other people to celebrate something they dont want to.  You dont go knocking on other peoples doors for christmas or easter

You wouldnt send your kid around asking for lollies any other day of the year it is dangerous.  So why do it on this one day.  


And as for the older kids who think its funny to egg peoples houses this is wrong too

Edited by roxybear, 29 October 2008 - 01:17 PM.


#11 zande

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:17 PM

Hate it. This year I am going to buy lollies tho as I was sick of opening the door last year to little faces expecting treats (despite a sign on our door requesting no door-knockers). I wouldn't mind an organised thing, like if the whole street got together and agreed on it or something, but my kids will never be doing it and I wish other kids didn't. It's an American tradition.

Edited by slidingdoors, 29 October 2008 - 01:18 PM.


#12 ~meh~

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:18 PM

oh and as a side note:

trick-or-treating originated in Ireland and Britain....

#13 Lackyband

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:19 PM

Nope don't approve, full on miserable scrotes here  laughing2.gif

We have heard every excuse under the sun

"We ( the parents ) stand right on the footpath"

"They do it in groups"

"We check the stuff before they eat it"  wacko.gif

yadda yadda yadda


I stand by our decision on pure safety grounds,  We try to teach the kids about stranger danger the whole year round, not for 'most of the time' cept for when you can score a bagful of crap.


Cheers, Connie

#14 **Xena**

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:19 PM

We celebrate it as a pagan festival (even though it's at the wrong time of the year  laughing2.gif )

#15 ~meh~

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE
"We ( the parents ) stand right on the footpath"

"They do it in groups"


we the parents go to the door in this area! And yes its normally groups of friends or families doing it.

#16 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:20 PM

I disapprove of it.  I especially disapprove of kids out of costume knocking on my door which happened a few times last year.

It's culturally irrelevant to Australia and a US import I'm happy to live without.

#17 mumtoactivetoddler

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:21 PM

Our estate does it, and there are a lot of people from other areas come too. I don't mind it its very cute, and I only hand out one mintie and a chocolate to each kid because I figure they get so much. Our estate is also seriously into christmas lights such that we clog up the main roads around us on christmas eve.

#18 Lackyband

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE
I could just imagine the poor little kids face after dressing up and setting out and then knocking on YOUR door


That would be just too bad and not my responsibility.   It would be the parents fault for teaching their kids that everyone is going to do something just because they do.

Sheesh what a sense of entitlement.


Cheers, Connie

#19 MsDemeanor

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:22 PM

QUOTE
I do despise those miserable scrote mothers that run off the back of "But this is Australia!!


I am in the miserable scrote camp. I don't know anyone here who has ever trick or treated, carved out pumpkins or celebrated Halloween. I didn't realise it was even an Australian tradition to do so?

#20 Crocmonster

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:23 PM

I really can understand why people are opposed to it but we love it  tongue.gif  i don't and wont ever take my kids trick or treating but we do participate by letting them dress up and we have lollies for the kids that door knock.

They don't get more than a freddo frog each or a small packet of lollies. I see no harm in it. The kids have a great night and some of them really go all out on their costumes.

If you don't want to participate that'd totally fine too. Perfaps put a note on your door telling them not to knock?

#21 thiseldome

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:23 PM

QUOTE
What are the "tricks" going to be anyway??


Normally DH opening the window quietly and yelling BOO!! when they knock, and then the biggest surprise ever.... Normally a piece of fruit, sesame snaps or 1 singular marshmallow  laughing2.gif

I don't agree with it, I have always told my kids to not accept sweets from stranger's, I am certainly not going to encourage them go knocking for it.

#22 Radler

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:24 PM

QUOTE
Nope don't approve, full on miserable scrotes here


Same. I think it's dangerous and rude.  Rude to ask strangers for lollies, and rude to threaten a 'trick' if they don't comply.  I don't really care if it's American, Australian or Argentinian in origin.  

Our house got egged last year. Not impressed.

#23 Banana Pancakes

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:24 PM

I dont disapprove but I certainly wont be encouraging my children to do it. They eat enough crap at Easter let alone having another day dedicated to eating junk food.

#24 !!!

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:24 PM

I think it's just yet another reason to stuff your face full of junk as a kid. I won't be supplying a single neighbourhood child with sugary crap. Mean aren't I  dev (6).gif

Edited by aberfeldy, 29 October 2008 - 01:30 PM.


#25 Rubixx

Posted 29 October 2008 - 01:24 PM

Having a costume party is ok but I don't agree with trick or treating in the streets. It's an American tradition, it should stay there...




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