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Need opinions - leaving child in car (paying for petrol etc)


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145 replies to this topic

#51 censura carnero

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:16 PM

QUOTE
yes and I remember hearing about a case where a little boy got his penis stuck in the plug hole of the bath... I still bathe my children


laughing2.gif

Exactly, of all the millions of mums and dads who get petrol each week I have never, ever seen someone get the kids out of the car.  If cars combusting and getting stolen with children were even an occasional thing then possibly.  But the risk is miniscule that it doesn't even cause me the slightest stress to leave them.

#52 laughter

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:17 PM

QUOTE
yes and I remember hearing about a case where a little boy got his penis stuck in the plug hole of the bath... I still bathe my children


  rolleyes.gif

#53 ~~JMC~~

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:21 PM

I leave my kids in the car. I go to one particular service station near our home and I only use the pumps closest to the shop front. I can see my child/ren the entire time and they can see me. If it is a warm day I put the windows down or open the sun roof and lock the car when I go in. I have never ever had any problems with this.

I also notice a lot of other parents doing the exact same thing.

#54 Lucky*Mum

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:22 PM

I have a few things i do.

1. Get DH to fill it up for me
2. Do it when there is someone else in the car with me who can stay in the car while i go into pay
3. Use a petrol station that has eftpos facilities at the pumps
4. Use a petrol station where they come out and fill it up for you
5. Do it myself and get all the kids out and go pay.

original.gif

#55 DontKnowDontCare

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:26 PM

QUOTE
How annoying would that be for the other drivers waiting in the queue in the heat?


I understand what you are saying, but I don't care how annoying it is for them, my child's safety is paramount over their patience/comfort factor, and I judge it to be safer to take him with me than to leave him in the car.

#56 thiseldome

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:32 PM

I wont leave my kids in the car, I will fuel up, drive to the parking space, get the kids out, pay and then off we go. Or get petrol of a night on my way to work. And I have 2 kids 17 months apart, its easily done. I'm too paranoid someone will crash into a bowser or something  laughing2.gif

For those who want to know the rules when it comes to leaving your kids, the following is from a mate of mine with the Vic Police. (never knew it was actually a 'law" to secure your car)

QUOTE
213. Making a motor vehicle secure
(1) This rule applies to the driver of a motor vehicle who stops and leaves the vehicle on a road (except to pay a fee for parking the vehicle) so the driver is over 3 metres from the closest part of the vehicle if there is nobody 16 years old, or older, in the vehicle. Note Motor vehicle is defined in the Road Safety Act 1986.

(2) Before leaving the motor vehicle, the driver must comply with this rule. Penalty: 2 penalty units.

(3) The driver must— (a) switch off the engine; and (b) apply the parking brake effectively or, if weather conditions (for example, snow) would prevent the effective operation of the parking brake, effectively restrain the motor vehicle’s movement in another way.

(4) If there is nobody in the motor vehicle, the driver must—
(a) remove the ignition key; and
(b) if the doors of the vehicle can be locked—lock the doors.

The other one relates to the offence of Leave Child Unattended, straight from Children, Youth & Families Act:

494 Offence to leave child unattended
(1) A person who has the control or charge of a child
must not leave the child without making reasonable provision for the child's supervision and care for a time which is unreasonable having regard to all the circumstances of the case.


#57 not-surprised

Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:40 PM

Uh-oh not again blink.gif.

I leave my DD in the car and take the keys with me. If it's hot I make sure I get a pump in the shade and leave the windows down.

If we are in Sydney then I lock the car with the windows up. If it's hot weather I try to fuel up either early or late in the day.

The Vic police rules about securing a car won't apply because a servo driveway is NOT a public road. And I think you would struggle to enforce a child protection law about child supervision while paying for petrol.

If someone challenged me about doing this IRL and said they would call the Police or DOCS I would happily give them my contact details and tell them to go for their life!

Steph

#58 **Tiger*Filly**

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:02 PM

I leave my children in the car while paying for petrol and have been doing so for many years. As per thiseldome's post I am entirely confident my children are suitably supervised and cared for in a locked car in the shade within my line of sight for 3 minutes.

#59 crazymummyp

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:22 PM

QUOTE
How is parking next to the closest bowser any better than a further away bowser??? If someone was going to take your car (with children in it or without children in it) I doubt how far away you parked is going to enable you to stop them... or make your kids safer.
Well, I would disagree. If anyone went near my car, I would see it and be back to the car in under 10 seconds, literally, screaming on my way. I very much doubt someone who was looking to steal my car would persist with that sort of attention being drawn to them.

QUOTE
How is having the children in eye view any better than not being able to see them?
Seriously, you really see no difference?  wacko.gif It's so blatantly obvious I don't even know what to say to that.

Edited by crazymummyp, 26 October 2008 - 01:22 PM.


#60 MadamFrou-Frou

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:24 PM

How many child kidnappers are able to hotwire a locked car fast enough to get your child out without you or any other passers-by noticing?

they would be better off snatching your kid away in the store while you're paying for the petrol.

#61 natcul

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:46 PM

I never leave DD in the car.

I have only filled up a couple of times but to make life easier DH always fills up both cars on Tuesday nights at the servo down the road.  Makes life easier.

#62 Midwitch

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:47 PM

I usually have between one and five children in the car at any given time. I never take them out to pay for petrol and never have. I have a car alarm with remote, and its also got an engine disabler. No way could someone steal the car. The risks of being bowled on the forecourt far outweigh the risks of anything happening for the 2-5 minutes I am in the shop.

#63 RaisingTwo

Posted 26 October 2008 - 01:59 PM

Helicopter parenting anyone?  rolleyes.gif

#64 catnat

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:08 PM

Mine stay in the car.

DH manages a petrol station and he said the large majority of people leave their kids in the car. Actually if I am just running in to drop off something for DH I leave them in the car too.

There are many times I have taken them into the Service Station with me (to see DH) and I really believe it is much safer for them in the car for quick just paying trips than dragging 3 toddlers across. Crossing the 'forecourt' area with cars going everywhere and often they just start up and go without looking and go too fast and doors in the shop that slide open directly onto where cars drive so they could run straight out and in front very easily has made me come to this conclusion.

#65 ~cackleberry~

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:21 PM

Mine stay in the car also.  But, each to their own really.  If you feel safer taking them with you, then keep doing it.  original.gif

#66 soapy

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:27 PM

I normally get fuel when someone is in the car with me or get it when DH is home (well, he normally gets it). I have left DS in the car once as it was in a small town, there was no-one else at the petrol station and the pump wasnt far from the door of the shop.

I could see if you have more than one that it would be really difficult to take them in with you.

#67 monkeymagic

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:33 PM

I do a bit of both, sometime leave her, sometime take her. it really depends, where i am, how busy the station is, what mood i'm in , what mood DD is in and what my gut tells me to do. we used to have pay at the pump but they removed them all so now there is no option other than to go in.

I try to fill up when i dont have DD or i have someone else in the car with me so i dont have to worry about this but on the time i have left her in the car i always lock the car so no one can just hop in and take off.

#68 Guest_~Cupcake~_*

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:43 PM

QUOTE
This question comes up a lot and always the "car will blow up/get stolen/get too hot" scenarios get raised. Thing is though, I have never once heard of any of these happening whilst a parent paid for petrol. I don't know of any reported cases.


It does happen and has happened (not blow up but catch fire). Cars can catch fire from a static electricity charge from the human body. If the driver gets out of the car without touching a metal part of the car to "discharge" and then straight away starts putting petrol into the car, it can cause a fire in the fuel tank (though the risk is low). This is why it's so important to "discharge" every time you get out of the car, simply by touching the metal part of the car original.gif .

Edited by ~Cupcake~, 26 October 2008 - 02:46 PM.


#69 ~cackleberry~

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:48 PM

QUOTE
It does happen and has happened (not blow up but catch fire). Cars can catch fire from a static electricity charge from the human body. If the driver gets out of the car without touching a metal part of the car to "discharge" and then straight away starts putting petrol into the car, it can cause a fire in the fuel tank (though the risk is low). This is why it's so important to "discharge" every time you get out of the car, simply by touching the metal part of the car


I asked my DH about this, as this was also something of concern to me.  He said that it was mainly in America this happened though, not here in Australia.

#70 Guest_~Cupcake~_*

Posted 26 October 2008 - 02:55 PM

QUOTE
I asked my DH about this, as this was also something of concern to me. He said that it was mainly in America this happened though, not here in Australia.


Yes it is less common in Australia, but still does happen. It is common with jerry cans at service stations here though . So Australians still do need to "discharge".

There is more info here: Static, a drivers guide to fires caused by static electricity

Edited by ~Cupcake~, 26 October 2008 - 03:02 PM.


#71 Bored_Much

Posted 26 October 2008 - 03:10 PM

I go to the petrol station that accepts credit card at the bowser when I have DD with me, otherwise, I wait until either I have DH or someone else with me or DD is in someone's care and therefore not with me.

#72 LynnyP

Posted 26 October 2008 - 03:22 PM

With one child I take her in.  I don't have experience of more than one child at a time.  The OP is asking about one child.

I don't make my decisions based on what others would think or what most people do, I make them based on my values, my children and my risk assessment.

I don't think it is likely the car will blow up, I don't think it is likely there will be a fire, I don't think it is likely that someone will steal it.  I do think it is possible that it might take longer than I expected and my child might be distressed and I won't be there to reassure them.

#73 RaisingTwo

Posted 26 October 2008 - 04:21 PM

QUOTE
It does happen and has happened (not blow up but catch fire). Cars can catch fire from a static electricity charge from the human body. If the driver gets out of the car without touching a metal part of the car to "discharge" and then straight away starts putting petrol into the car, it can cause a fire in the fuel tank

So what you're saying is a car can catch fire WHILE you're putting petrol in it (and presumably while your child is inside the car and NOT AFTER when you're paying for your fuel. Does that mean you have to take your child out of the car prior to putting petrol in just in case it does catch fire in the meantime?  wacko.gif LOL

#74 Guest_~Cupcake~_*

Posted 26 October 2008 - 04:31 PM

QUOTE
So what you're saying is a car can catch fire WHILE you're putting petrol in it (and presumably while your child is inside the car and NOT AFTER when you're paying for your fuel. Does that mean you have to take your child out of the car prior to putting petrol in just in case it does catch fire in the meantime? wacko.gif LOL


No, it can start in the fuel tank and stay in there until the flames get so big it comes out of the fuel tank. By that time you could have walked off to pay. I saw a story on this and that is exactly what happened to the woman. So don't assume.  wacko.gif back at you. Geez that smiley is RUDE.

#75 4littlemonkeys

Posted 26 October 2008 - 04:31 PM

I have three children so they stay in the car. I make sure i use the bowser closest to the shop.  If I only had one child I would either take the child with me or I would fill up when I was on my own or send DH to do it.




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