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Health food people spoiling MY childs diet!


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164 replies to this topic

#1 DadAgain

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:37 AM

Ok - I'm p*ssed off.. this probably belongs in 'venting', but I'm interested to see what you all think:

Our daycare centre currently provides lunches. They dont provide mornign or afternoon tea - so we have the pain-in-the-butt task of filling lunchboxes with suitable snacks and then filling the dishwasher with a gazillioni little plastic tubs at the end of the day!...

Anyway - recently they wrote to us saying (and I'm paraphrasing) "Due to a number of complaints that our lunches are not wholy organic, may contain too much gluten, lactose or other commonly found ingredients we have decided to cease the provision of lunches".

Lunches used to be a varied rotation of balanced meals, pastas, vegetable bakes, fruits etc etc... Now things will go downhill:
1) The rush to prepare the school bag will get WAAY worse
2) The quality ofthe food provided will be WAAAY worse
3) The amount of staff time dedicated to food prep instead of childcare will surely go UP as opening 30 lunchboxes and retrieving and serving the wide variety of lunches will surely be harder work than delving out the same dish to 30 kids?!

Is it right that these vocal food-people should be able to spoil it for everyone else?  rant.gif

(I have absolute sympathy for the CC director who has had to endure their complaints - so can completely understand her position!)

#2 LunaBlue

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:41 AM

This also happened at my DD kindy aswell. So I began sending her with lunch./ Last week another note came home saying we were not allowed to send Chocolate yogurt, some biscuits, and various other things as well and I was furious. It is a struggle to pack her something she will actually eat that is on thier list of what she can and can't take.

#3 Straight*No*Chaser

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:42 AM

Sounds like a few parents have gone a bit OTT.

So if you are packing the lunches yourself now, why will the quality go down? Can't you pack healthy stuff? Sorry I'm a bit confused by that comment.

Try packing the lunches the night before, it is so much quicker and easier than trying to do it on the day.

#4 DadAgain

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:43 AM

QUOTE
So if you are packing the lunches yourself now,...

No - now we pack morning and afternoon tea - lunch is provided.
in future we will have to provide lunch too.

IMHO - a hastily packed cold lunch can never meet the same standard as a wholesome cooked meal.

QUOTE
Let mumagain stay at home and have more babies

Haa!! very funny!!.. but I dont think I could manage the guilt of removing another skilled midwife from the already small workforce struggling to look after the wonderful pregnant women of Brisbane  tongue.gif

Edited by DadAgain, 12 June 2007 - 11:46 AM.


#5 KimminyCricket

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:45 AM

It's not hard to pack a sandwich, some fruit and rice crackers.  They're kids for gooness sake - they don't need a three course meal for lunch  rolleyes.gif

It should only take you a couple of minutes a day to spread some vegemite on some bread......

#6 DadAgain

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:47 AM

QUOTE
It's not hard to pack a sandwich, some fruit and rice crackers. They're kids for gooness sake - they don't need a three course meal for lunch


yeah - you've never met my daughters have you? wacko.gif  huh.gif They have voracious appetites and can be very demanding when it comes to the quantity of food they require!

Edited by DadAgain, 12 June 2007 - 11:48 AM.


#7 everycloud

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:48 AM

Pack lunches the night before, so much easier.

Stop and think why some parents might not want lactose/gluten etc in their childs lunches, it may not be a health kick thing but an intolerance/allergy thing.

Once children attend school you have to pack lunch every day anyway.

If your child was at home and not at daycare you'd be making lunch anyway.

What's the big deal?

#8 LunaBlue

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:49 AM

QUOTE
It should only take you a couple of minutes a day to spread some vegemite on some bread......



well that depnds on how many lunches you are making doesn't it.

I make three and they are all different. I am sure DH would not survive on what I pack for the kids, and both kids have different lunches due to dietry needs. I do make mine at night because I simply would not have time in the mornings to do them. However this is not practical for all people either.




edited to add

QUOTE
Stop and think why some parents might not want lactose/gluten etc in their childs lunches, it may not be a health kick thing but an intolerance/allergy thing



if thats the case, then why does the rest of the kids haveto conform as well, wouldn't it be a whole lot easier for those parents to pack special lunches for the kids?

Edited by ~PUSS~, 12 June 2007 - 11:51 AM.


#9 DadAgain

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:51 AM

QUOTE
Once children attend school you have to pack lunch every day anyway.


Dont schools have a kitchen/canteen/cafe? any more??
I had hot food for lunch at school every day until about yr8

QUOTE
What's the big deal?

So many plastic tubs, so little time... and so little space left in the school bag! Pretty soon DD#1 is gonna need a 65lt rucksack just to carry food and a spare set of clothes to CC!

Edited by DadAgain, 12 June 2007 - 11:53 AM.


#10 KimminyCricket

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:52 AM

Their tiny bellies are so small - they don't need a huge amount of food to sustain them.

Send them with a vegemite/jam/cheese sandwich, two pieces of fruit, some plain rice crackers and a packet of sultanas or tub of yoghurt.  That is more than enough.

Children today are give WAY too much - it sets them up for eating problems down the track.
QUOTE
Dont schools have a kitchen/canteen/cafe? any more??
I had hot food for lunch at school every day until about yr8

You're not in the UK now DadAgain  rolleyes.gif

Edited by *Boosmum*, 12 June 2007 - 11:53 AM.


#11 Nicole

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:53 AM

I love the fact that I only have to send a piece of fruit to pre school with DD. If I had to make her lunch and was given a list of what she can and cant take, I would tell them to stick it.

What I find interesting in this though, is how they are going to control the food intake of kids with allergies. All kids share their food, especially at this age, and it will be a might big task for the teachers to be making sure there are no food exchanges happening.

I know at DD's pre school, there are a few kids with different allergies, nuts, eggs etc. All food is prepared accordingly, ie, they don't use anything that any child may be allergic to in any meals. They go sa far as to not allow parents to bring in a cake for their child's birthday, we pay $3.00 to the school and they bake and decorate a  cake especially. (I love this idea)

Dadagain, I wonder how much thought they have given to the allergy issues?

#12 writestuff

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:55 AM

I'm with you - that sounds bloody annoying.

I suspect the creche is just trying to get out of running a kitchen rather than trying to meet the needs of organic parents.

I don't see why they can't make an organic, vegan meal all the children can eat anyway. It will be sure to be healthier than what parents provide.

#13 Nicole

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:57 AM

TheCrone, I don't know where your kids go to school, but at my bigger kids canteens, they can and do buy hot food everyday. It is available, before school, they do breakfast both hot and cold, recess and lunch. All food is healthy, as in low fat etc. My kids would never cope if they couldn't get a hot lunch during winter  biggrin.gif

#14 Canberra chick

Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:58 AM

DadAgain, DS's centre has always had the parents send the lunches in - there are no proper kitchens (just microwaves and fridges in each room).


As DH and I took in packed lunches anyway, adding in one other lunch was not a big drama.

DS usually has leftovers from the night before that get heated up. Occasionally he gets a big sandwich. Plus yoghurt, rolled oats and fruit in a tub (as we make our own yoghurt), crackers with cream cheese and sultanas, cheese cubes and olives/a small ham and cheese sandwich.

It takes me a maximum of 10 minutes to assemble that each night (DH and I have the yoghurt tub too) and a mere minute or two to put it in a bag the next morning. The centre provides fruit for morning tea.

I like it because
1. it's cheap
2. it's easy
3. I don't have to stress about DS accidentally being given somethinng he's allergic to
4. DS being given stuff I would think is too processed/junky/sweet

Our centre also has rules about what we can send in:
no chips/lollies/chocolatey museli bars/fizzy drinks/sugary cordial etc (they provide water and milk)
no nuts
pies/pizza/fried goods to be a very rare thing

Julie, who is stunned at the number of Aussie parents who think a vegemite sandwich is an adequate lunch when it's really better as an afternoon snack!!!  ohmy.gif (Oh, and was also stunned to hear two parents say that they liked their kid's centre being catered as 'at least that way X gets one good meal a day' sad.gif)

Edited by Canberra chick, 12 June 2007 - 12:00 PM.


#15 brodyb

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:03 PM

Do you get a reduction in fees?  unsure.gif

#16 Dani

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:05 PM

Sorry but what a f'ing lame OP.  I would also state that I would like the "nazi" word removed too....this is a blanket rule on EB to the best of my knowledge.  I (in a roundabout way) resent being referred to as a "food nazi" on the back of my kid having a disease in relation to food - no coeliac is not an allergy but indeed a disease., google it for some education.  glare.gif  Do you think Mothers like myself enjoy having appointments with Directors of childcare centres on the back of their childs strict dietary requirements - hell no!  My kid didn't ask for it and for that reason alone I refuse to let her be victamised because of it.

Quit whingeing *** and be glad you have such perfect girls with such voracious appetites _ I would kill for one of them.  This is all about tollerance and understanding and parents bending a little for other parents in order to help their kids.

Get up 5 mins early and make them their own hot lunch if it's that important to you ~ you may have had hot meals everyday until Year 8  rolleyes.gif  but I certainly managed to survive on whatever my Mum threw in my lunchbox, and I assure you it wasn't bloody hot either.


Dani...has a bee in her bonnet about ignorant people today!

#17 PurpleWitch

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:06 PM

Do people really have their kids eat at the school canteen every day??

*shock*

I think mine has had it twice in the last 12 months.

How hard is it to make lunch?

#18 Canberra chick

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:07 PM

Oh, and DA, surely sending in a packed lunch has to be better than the overboiled veggies and tapioca that you and I probably got for school lunches in the UK?!  sick.gif

ETA, because I just saw Anna's post - Anna, in the UK it was very common for children to get hot meals at school. Until the mid 80s, they actually did meet strict nutritional standards and were a good way of encouraging good table manners. At my primary school, a senior child or teacher  would help serve the little ones and help with those who still weren't great with using cutlery. And we'd help to clear the tables and learn not to reach over to get the salt etc. Have a squizz at what the Japanses do for their school lunches - canteen doesn't have to mean chips and burgers.

Edited by Canberra chick, 12 June 2007 - 12:10 PM.


#19 KimminyCricket

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:08 PM

CC a vegemite sandwich, piece of fruit and bottle of water is more than enough for a 3 yo for lunch  ohmy.gif  They don't need a hot meal - they get that in the evening.

#20 JRA

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE
Do people really have their kids eat at the school canteen every day??

\
I have to agree

#21 Nicole

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE
Do people really have their kids eat at the school canteen every day??


Yes Anna, mine do. They prefer it, it is pretty uncool in high school to take your lunch. I know they get healthy foods, because none of their schools serves junk, they aren't allowed.

Nope, it's not hard to make lunches, I do it for DH, but my kids prefer to buy it, it's no skin off my nose.

CC, I didn't see anyone post....

QUOTE
Oh, and was also stunned to hear two parents say that they liked their kid's centre being catered as 'at least that way X gets one good meal a day


#22 brodyb

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:10 PM

QUOTE
I would also state that I would like the "nazi" word removed too
Dani, I cant even see it?? unsure.gif

#23 Princess.cranky.pants

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:13 PM

QUOTE
Dont schools have a kitchen/canteen/cafe? any more??


Not all schools do. The one I used to work at (before I became a SAHM) didn't have tuckshop. There was the building but Parents have to run and there was no one to do it. They did have a sausage sizzle one day per week.

I think it would end up quite expensive if your kids are buying lunch everyday at school.

Do you have to pay for school lunches in the UK?

#24 PurpleWitch

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:13 PM

My kids prefer lots of things. Doesn't mean I give in original.gif

#25 KimminyCricket

Posted 12 June 2007 - 12:14 PM

Absolutely Anna!  For us, canteen was a treat - not a staple.




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