Jump to content

Do you think that regional areas want tourists?


  • Please log in to reply
98 replies to this topic

#1 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:27 PM

I have an opportunity for a NSW road trip for a week or so in August - think Coffs Harbour, Armidale, Dubbo, Parkes ... and places in between.

It has got me thinking about the divided opinions around supporting regional areas - from what I can see from my bushfire-affected home town, it swung from wanting drought support, to needing people to stay away due to fires, to wanting support post-fires, to being fearful of outsiders and wanting to remain feeling isolated due to COVID. I have not yet picked up the vibe on the feeling now that some travel is an option,.

I am hoping that the couple of months between now and the potential  travel will make it clearer for me. But what do you think? Not necessarily specifically about my trip, but about what is the right thing to do for regional NSW/Australia?

#2 lotsofbots

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:34 PM

We live in One of those areas you mentioned, general consensus is that rolled would like a road block in the Blue Mts and no non locals.

#3 steppy

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:34 PM

I think by August you will have a better idea. I wouldn't do it now, but I might by then if there are no cases of Covid.

#4 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:37 PM

 steppy, on 21 May 2020 - 06:34 PM, said:

I think by August you will have a better idea. I wouldn't do it now, but I might by then if there are no cases of Covid.
That is what I am hoping. I do not have to commit any time soon. It is just an option.

#5 just roses

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:45 PM

I know in Queensland there's a lot of resistance to having non-locals in town. But if you've got a local state number plate, people wouldn't know how far you have come.

There's a push for Queenslanders to travel regionally (up to 250km) in the June holidays. Regional areas really do need tourists to inject cash into the local economy. But they're also (understandably) wary.

I know I'm wary. I want the Queensland border to remain closed to NSW.

#6 No Drama Please

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:46 PM

From what I’ve read it seems to be locals only at the moment. I’d do it for work if I had to but think it would make for an uncomfortable holiday.

One interesting thing I heard was a restaurant owner saying he had to turn people away because only 10 people, he said he was worried that would put people off making return trips at a later time, because they’d just remember the bad experience.

That’s something I hadn’t actually thought of, the long term impacts of negative tourism if people go too early, have bad experiences, and it puts them off going back forever. Especially on small towns that normally relied on tourism.

#7 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:47 PM

Around us its a pretty strong no, stay away.

A lot of areas have been outspoken about FIFO even, so lots of extra precautions have been taken to make sure the FIFO workers dont come into contact with any locals.

I think most people will feel a bit more confident around August/September - after winter is over.

Edited by ~Jolly_F~, 21 May 2020 - 06:47 PM.


#8 PrincessPeach

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:57 PM

 just roses, on 21 May 2020 - 06:45 PM, said:

I know in Queensland there's a lot of resistance to having non-locals in town. But if you've got a local state number plate, people wouldn't know how far you have come.

There's a push for Queenslanders to travel regionally (up to 250km) in the June holidays. Regional areas really do need tourists to inject cash into the local economy. But they're also (understandably) wary.

I know I'm wary. I want the Queensland border to remain closed to NSW.

Depends how far remote you go -west of the range & most towns folk know you are not locals, even with a 4wd & qld plates.

ETA - in answer to the question, i'd wait a bit closer to the time & then see. Because currently the feeling is they dont want non-locals in town.

Edited by PrincessPeach, 21 May 2020 - 06:59 PM.


#9 rosie28

Posted 21 May 2020 - 06:59 PM

A summary of what I’ve read on this today would be “yay, visitors spending money, good for the local economy especially in bushfire areas, we have no idea where THEY have been, hell no stay away!” So I have no idea. We had planned a number of trips in Victoria this year to support communities affected by the bushfires and/or drought. Now we’ll likely stay home and support our local shops and restaurants more. Our locals would be likely to come out the other end of this intact anyway, but I’m not risking it.

#10 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:00 PM

 PrincessPeach, on 21 May 2020 - 06:57 PM, said:



Depends how far remote you go -west of the range & most towns folk know you are not locals, even with a 4wd & qld plates.

The outsider can always be picked, not matter how much they try to fit in...

#11 shellymabelly

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:05 PM

Feeling around these parts is that businesses that run accomodation, tours etc that rely on tourism are begging for people to come, but the general populations is wishing they'd stay away

#12 born.a.girl

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:06 PM

 No Drama Please, on 21 May 2020 - 06:46 PM, said:

From what I’ve read it seems to be locals only at the moment. I’d do it for work if I had to but think it would make for an uncomfortable holiday.

One interesting thing I heard was a restaurant owner saying he had to turn people away because only 10 people, he said he was worried that would put people off making return trips at a later time, because they’d just remember the bad experience.

That’s something I hadn’t actually thought of, the long term impacts of negative tourism if people go too early, have bad experiences, and it puts them off going back forever. Especially on small towns that normally relied on tourism.


That's a good point and a reminder, when it IS encouraged, to book first if wanting to eat in.   For the restaurant it would be awful to have waited so long to make a bit of money (or lose less, more likely) and have to turn people away, who are only trying to do the right thing.

I hadn't thought of that either, so thanks for the reminder.

#13 born.a.girl

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:08 PM

 shellymabelly, on 21 May 2020 - 07:05 PM, said:

Feeling around these parts is that businesses that run accomodation, tours etc that rely on tourism are begging for people to come, but the general populations is wishing they'd stay away

Do you feel it's related totally to jobs?

If I had not lost my income I'd not want to take a tiny risk; if my business was about to go to the wall, I'd absolutely take a tiny risk.

(Along with the employees who'd have a job if the tourism business is back. Not everyone has qualified for jobseeker or jobkeeper.)

Edited by born.a.girl, 21 May 2020 - 07:08 PM.


#14 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:10 PM

 rosie28, on 21 May 2020 - 06:59 PM, said:

A summary of what I’ve read on this today would be “yay, visitors spending money, good for the local economy especially in bushfire areas, we have no idea where THEY have been, hell no stay away!” So I have no idea. We had planned a number of trips in Victoria this year to support communities affected by the bushfires and/or drought. Now we’ll likely stay home and support our local shops and restaurants more. Our locals would be likely to come out the other end of this intact anyway, but I’m not risking it.
This is the tricky situation, isn't it. I am not even comfortable travelling the 3 hrs to see my immediate family, who I am missing terribly. So I am not sure why I think that my mindset will change by August, but the other part of me really would love to accompany this friend on their trip and support people who have been struggling.

Most of our activity would be quite isolated - bush walks, beaches etc. But then we still have to eat.

#15 Ernegirl

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:28 PM

At the risk of sounding parochial, I think we should all shop/visit/tour our own localities first.  We've been in lockdown, even hitting Maccas feels like an excursion :) In all seriousness, we can't risk opening the floodgates, we have to do this incrementally.

#16 Mrs Claus

Posted 21 May 2020 - 07:30 PM

As someone who lives in a regional tourist area (not the ones mentioned in the OP) there’s a lot of talk from locals not wanting visitors at the moment- myself being one of them.

by August it could be a different story hopefully

#17 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:01 PM

 Ernegirl, on 21 May 2020 - 07:28 PM, said:

At the risk of sounding parochial, I think we should all shop/visit/tour our own localities first.  We've been in lockdown, even hitting Maccas feels like an excursion Posted Image In all seriousness, we can't risk opening the floodgates, we have to do this incrementally.
I am well and truly of the same thinking. I guess I am just wanting the same crystal ball as everyone else to know where things will be at in 2.5 months, because I would love to do this trip and to eject funds into some regional economies ... IF it ends up being safe to do so.

#18 Kreme

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:03 PM

The feeling I get is that right now tourists aren’t really wanted in a lot of regional areas. I think it’s an excellent point about restaurants. With a 10 person limit a lot of restaurants won’t be able to cater for locals, let alone visitors. I think it would be more sensible to delay travel until restrictions have been eased further.

Just as an aside I also hope that city dwellers won’t be expecting a ticker tape parade when they turn up in bushfire affected areas. When the time is right yes go, spend your money but don’t make a big deal about it.

#19 rosie28

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:09 PM

 Ernegirl, on 21 May 2020 - 07:28 PM, said:

At the risk of sounding parochial, I think we should all shop/visit/tour our own localities first.  We've been in lockdown, even hitting Maccas feels like an excursion :) In all seriousness, we can't risk opening the floodgates, we have to do this incrementally.

Parochial quite suits a pandemic I think! The problem is a lot of city areas will fare ok I think, lots of people and once things open they’ll have visitors, at least some. They’re more likely to survive than a small business in a regional area. There’s probably a logical tipping point where it makes sense to welcome visitors again, it’s just hard to tell when that might be. There’s a bit of commentary along the lines of “well if they don’t want us we’ll never go back” and “we’re only welcome for our money”, which is a bit worrying for the future. I’d love to make it up to my brother’s place in regional Victoria later this year, so fingers crossed! If not then the greater Melbourne area has a lot to offer and we’ll find day trips to do nice and close to home.

#20 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:21 PM

 Kreme, on 21 May 2020 - 08:03 PM, said:

Just as an aside I also hope that city dwellers won’t be expecting a ticker tape parade when they turn up in bushfire affected areas. When the time is right yes go, spend your money but don’t make a big deal about it.
Surely not? What is making you think that people would be after making a big deal about it, or wanting a big deal made about them? Do you think that is the vibe that is being put out?

I like to think that most people would be going to enjoy a holiday whilst also knowing that their break is supporting a community that has done it tough through fires and COVID19. No ticker tape parades needed. No thanks needed, because at the end of the day the "city dwellers" are the LUCKY ones getting to spend time in awesome areas - it is not an act of charity, I think the visitors still come out in front.

But I am probably more a "country folk" at heart ... a regional area is still what I think of as "home". I do want to go home before the time that I am thinking of other travel - and I guess my feelings around that trip will be a good barometer for the other travel.

Edited by SkeptiHandsOnMum, 21 May 2020 - 08:22 PM.


#21 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:38 PM

Thank you everyone for your input so far. It is, I guess, more appropriate to ask "WHEN do you think that regional areas WILL want tourists?". Which is a typically silly COVID-19 question. I guess I mainly just wanted a discussion to confirm my ambiguous thoughts around it. 10 or so weeks is such a long time in the times of COVID ... I think we might just pay extra for accommodation that is refundable, if and when we make a decision.

It must be causing some division in the regional areas themselves - I can see it on my FB feed, between family members whose employment relies on tourism, and those who want to lock down the region. It was similar in the early bushfire days - when the risk was high, but accommodation/tourism providers were still encouraging people to come. But how do you decide when COVID risk is acceptable to trade off? It is the same with pretty much every industry really, so I guess I am really just debating the obvious.

I think/hope that the next month will be telling times in where things are at, as restrictions start to ease and we see the response to this.

#22 hm6

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:39 PM

We booked a weekend away to a lovely cottage in August - only 3 hours away but we booked and paid in full back in January,( it was a gift). We didn’t cancel because there’s been too much else on my mind lately. And no I don’t expect a ticker tape parade - whatever gave you that idea? When I go on holidays - I like to be as unobtrusive as possible regardless of whether it’s the South Coast or the Amalfi Coast. Clearly on the Amalfi Coast my accent alone would make me stick out but I don’t want to be a loud ugly tourist wherever I go.

#23 Kreme

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:40 PM

 SkeptiHandsOnMum, on 21 May 2020 - 08:21 PM, said:

Surely not? What is making you think that people would be after making a big deal about it, or wanting a big deal made about them? Do you think that is the vibe that is being put out?

I like to think that most people would be going to enjoy a holiday whilst also knowing that their break is supporting a community that has done it tough through fires and COVID19. No ticker tape parades needed. No thanks needed, because at the end of the day the "city dwellers" are the LUCKY ones getting to spend time in awesome areas - it is not an act of charity, I think the visitors still come out in front.

But I am probably more a "country folk" at heart ... a regional area is still what I think of as "home". I do want to go home before the time that I am thinking of other travel - and I guess my feelings around that trip will be a good barometer for the other travel.

I feel like everyone I speak to wants to tell me how they are going to the south coast so they can help the communities that were affected by the bushfires. I can only hope that when they get there they will just spend the money quietly. But colour me cynical, I am just imagining every poor cafe owner having to be ever so grateful for people from Mosman buying a coffee from them.

I think the the Shoalhaven mayor mentioned something similar on ABC radio recently.  Basically explaining that a lot of people are traumatised so they might not be ready to be all happy and smiley and grateful that tourists are there.

#24 Dr Dolly

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:41 PM

I live in the Mornington Peninsula. There are regular threads on FB community pages complaining about day trippers and tourists. Those with holiday houses regularly get a blast from long term locals, coming in and buying all the groceries, adding risk, taking up potential space in hospitals in the area.

One poster suggested putting in a barrier at Peninsula link. Another poster suggested that you could tell a non local as they weren’t familiar with the layout of supermarkets.

So much commentary is driven by fear. (Understandably).

The Peninsula is popular for retirees, so high risk. Also a hot spot based on a family bringing back the virus from a holiday.









#25 a letter to Elise.

Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:42 PM

My sisters in a tourist area, and said they had swarms of tourists turn up last weekend. Pretty pointless, as most businesses there are still closed. They weren’t welcomed by locals.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.