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Throwing up after every feed


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#1 -Emissary-

Posted 25 April 2020 - 09:50 PM

DS2 is 4 months old and exclusively breastfeed. Since birth, he has been consistently throwing up after every single feed even after he burps. However, he has no issue on the weight front as he’s at 97th percentile (8.3kg today)

Even though he seems to be a healthy baby, should I be worried? He doesn’t just spit up milk...it’s usually projectile vomiting it up.

At his 4 months check up today, the nurse doesn’t seem to think it is an issue given he’s gaining weight. Should I get a second opinion?

Is there anything that can help settle his stomach better?

Edited by -Emissary-, 25 April 2020 - 09:53 PM.


#2 Ozquoll

Posted 25 April 2020 - 10:09 PM

I failed at breastfeeding so take my opinion with a grain of salt - but is he possibly just overfeeding each time and his tummy is not able to hold all that milk? Does he still vomit if given a much shorter feed than usual so that he is still a bit hungry?

#3 Zeppelina

Posted 25 April 2020 - 10:22 PM

When my DD started projectile vomiting at around 10-12 weeks, it turned out to be CMPI, but she was also refusing her feeds so it was clear that there was something else going on. If your DS is otherwise a happy baby, feeding well, weeing well and gaining weight (as you've said), then it likely isn't that and may just be one of those things.

But if it's causing you to worry, then maybe get a second opinion from a paed?

#4 -Emissary-

Posted 25 April 2020 - 11:00 PM

View PostOzquoll, on 25 April 2020 - 10:09 PM, said:

I failed at breastfeeding so take my opinion with a grain of salt - but is he possibly just overfeeding each time and his tummy is not able to hold all that milk? Does he still vomit if given a much shorter feed than usual so that he is still a bit hungry?

Yeah, he does unfortunately throw up after a small feed. Though not a lot and not as forceful.

Apparently breastfeeding babies can’t over feed. But it does sure feel like he is!!

#5 Zippypeaks

Posted 25 April 2020 - 11:13 PM

One of my babies was like this. Big spews after every feed, no medical professional was too concerned because he was a healthy and happy Bub in every other way. He grew out of it but now as a primary schooler, he has a sensitive gag reflex, if he sees or smells spew, or even coughs in an odd way, we all launch ourselves for a bucket.

#6 Ozquoll

Posted 25 April 2020 - 11:21 PM

View Post-Emissary-, on 25 April 2020 - 11:00 PM, said:

Yeah, he does unfortunately throw up after a small feed. Though not a lot and not as forceful.

Apparently breastfeeding babies can’t over feed. But it does sure feel like he is!!
I've heard that too, and I've never quite believed it 🤔. A bit of googling gave me this article, from a nurse/midwife:
https://www.babycare...e/detail/Reflux

She seems to think that even breastfed babies CAN sometimes overfeed.

I reckon I'd see your GP or Paed. for advice - at the very least, it can't be comfortable for your DS to be vomiting so often, and it would give you peace of mind to rule out any serious problems.

#7 *Ker*

Posted 25 April 2020 - 11:28 PM

DS was throwing up after every feed at 7 weeks old. He wasn't even getting the food digested.

I took him to a Pediatrician and he knew instantly what it was. Pyloric Stenosis.  He had to have an operation to slice the pyloric sphincter. Was back to normal straight after.

#8 Expelliarmus

Posted 25 April 2020 - 11:29 PM

DD1 did this. I had her checked by the MCHN, the nurse at the chemist weighing scales and the GP. As she was gaining weight and had no other issues they determined she was 'a happy chucker'. She was mostly breastfed up to 8 months although it didn't matter if she had breastmilk or formula, she chucked on both, and then formula fed only from 8 months. I used lactose free formula after a while because I wondered if she was lactose intolerant as my brother is. It did minimise the vomiting. She stopped vomiting around 10-12 months so I weaned her onto regular cows milk at 12 months. The biggest issue as a baby with her constant vomiting was a) the washing and b) it getting stuck in her neck folds and creating irritations/a sort of wet excema.

DD1 (nearly 20yo) now doesn't have straight milk at all, and hasn't since she was probably about 7 or 8 - it makes her feel 'a bit funny'. It's all anecdotal but I wonder if she has some sort of intolerance to milk/dairy. No one saw it as a problem however so I don't know how easy it would be to get it further investigated. If I were to have the same issue again I would try eliminating diary I think.

#9 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 26 April 2020 - 12:05 AM

My firstborn did this, starting at 9 days old and continued until he was 9mo. He was also chunky- 10kg by 6mo. He was fully BF and I eventually worked out that I had a large supply and fast letdown. He would guzzle it down then it would bounce back up again. Feeds only took 5 minutes and I only gave one side. He was never distressed by the vomiting so the GP and  MCHN were not concerned. It was a nightmare for me though. I was very nervous to feed him outside of home. I had towels everywhere. Luckily our house had floorboards because vomited on them so many times. I'd sit him up straight after the feed, point him away from soft furnishings, burp him and wait for it. One time he actually vomited all over me while feeding. :omg:

He outgrew it once he started to sit up. He has however been an extremely picky eater ever since.

#10 -Emissary-

Posted 26 April 2020 - 12:44 AM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 25 April 2020 - 11:29 PM, said:

It's all anecdotal but I wonder if she has some sort of intolerance to milk/dairy. No one saw it as a problem however so I don't know how easy it would be to get it further investigated. If I were to have the same issue again I would try eliminating diary I think.

I was thinking it might be lactose intolerance as well. I generally don’t have that much diary but it’s not completely eliminated. I might eliminate it starting tomorrow next to see if it makes a difference.


View PostFuzzyChocolateToes, on 26 April 2020 - 12:05 AM, said:

My firstborn did this, starting at 9 days old and continued until he was 9mo. He was also chunky- 10kg by 6mo. He was fully BF and I eventually worked out that I had a large supply and fast letdown. He would guzzle it down then it would bounce back up again. Feeds only took 5 minutes and I only gave one side. He was never distressed by the vomiting so the GP and  MCHN were not concerned. It was a nightmare for me though. I was very nervous to feed him outside of home. I had towels everywhere. Luckily our house had floorboards because vomited on them so many times. I'd sit him up straight after the feed, point him away from soft furnishings, burp him and wait for it. One time he actually vomited all over me while feeding. :omg:

He outgrew it once he started to sit up. He has however been an extremely picky eater ever since.

You’re describing us at the moment. I have a very fast let down and a decent supply. To the point the left boob actually sprays milk if DS unlatch during feed, which he does quite often if I give him that side. He prefers my right boob which has a slower flow.

Feeding is never more than 5 minutes and only ever on one side. The only time he doesn’t throw up is when he feeds at night. But then by 9 am, he would have woken up and already thrown up at least once. I’ve been thrown up on more times than I can remember in the last 4 months.

I’ve tried expressing and giving it to him in a bottle with a slow flow teat. He still throws up afterwards though.

He has started sitting in his high chair in the last week but this hasn’t really helped.

Edited by -Emissary-, 26 April 2020 - 12:50 AM.


#11 Lou-bags

Posted 26 April 2020 - 01:27 AM

Sounds very similar to my DS2. And me, with the forceful letdown and huge supply. Oddly enough I had the same letdown with DS1 and an even greater oversupply but he never was a chucker. They were both chubby babies (DS1 was over 11kg at 6mo and DS2 was 10.5kg).

Expelli my DS2 got the under the chin eczema too! Though his was also food related in the end too and ended up other places too like behind the knees and a couple of rather bad all over outbreaks (only ever nailed down one food, tomatoes, but there were more that I never did figure out) but he grew out of it.

You could try taking baby off the breast when the letdown comes and catch the spray in a towel, then relatch for a slower feed. I had limited success with that, he’d get p*ssy he wasn’t being fed.

A dummy and being in a bouncer for a while after a feed helped keep it down to a degree.

Sitting did help a little for him but I think it’s just time really.

Oh, and trying to minimize the amount of air he swallowed when feeding helped too- if only to limit the propulsion a little.

Gosh he was a shock after DS1 who hardly ever brought any milk up. I finally understood what all the bibs and bandanas and multiple changes of clothes for babies was all about.

#12 DaLittleEd

Posted 26 April 2020 - 01:41 AM

I also had a huge oversupply and very fast let down. The situation wasn't as bad as yours - DD only vomited after maybe 50% of feeds and it mainly resolved when she was 9 months.

What I did realise when DD was a few months old was that if my boobs were very full she would definitely vomit, if they were less full vomiting was less likely. I ended up expressing before feeding when they were very full. Normally a couple of times a day, and for only just long enough to soften my boobs, literally just a couple of minutes. Didn't seem to make the oversupply any worse and definitely reduced the vomiting.

#13 rubyskye

Posted 26 April 2020 - 05:52 AM

DS projectile vomitted every feed (exclusively breastfed) and it was CMPA.

#14 SummerStar

Posted 26 April 2020 - 07:16 AM

One of ours did this after ever feed. What looked like 75%, of what went in. Always a happy chubby baby though so no weight issues. Switched to soy formula and that sorted it out. As a child there was no intolerance issues and went from soy formula to cows milk with no problems.

#15 Bethlehem Babe

Posted 26 April 2020 - 07:54 AM

View Post-Emissary-, on 26 April 2020 - 12:44 AM, said:



I was thinking it might be lactose intolerance as well. I generally don’t have that much diary but it’s not completely eliminated. I might eliminate it starting tomorrow next to see if it makes a difference.




You’re describing us at the moment. I have a very fast let down and a decent supply. To the point the left boob actually sprays milk if DS unlatch during feed, which he does quite often if I give him that side. He prefers my right boob which has a slower flow.

Feeding is never more than 5 minutes and only ever on one side. The only time he doesn’t throw up is when he feeds at night. But then by 9 am, he would have woken up and already thrown up at least once. I’ve been thrown up on more times than I can remember in the last 4 months.

I’ve tried expressing and giving it to him in a bottle with a slow flow teat. He still throws up afterwards though.

He has started sitting in his high chair in the last week but this hasn’t really helped.
Firstly it’s unlikely to be lactose intolerance because breastmilk contains lactose, so for lactose intolerance it would result in a very sick baby.

https://www.breastfe...bf-info/lactose

It might be worth investigating potentially allergies and reflux. There’s a really great detailed and evidence based book by joy Anderson, a dietician and a lactation consultant and mum who went through allergies with her family.

Is there any chance it could be an oral restriction (tongue tie)? This may impact on how much air is being taken in.

#16 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 26 April 2020 - 08:15 AM

If your baby is otherwise growing well and happy, then I really wouldn’t worry about it (from your baby’s perspective anyway). I totally get that cleaning up vomit all the time is gross.

#17 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 26 April 2020 - 08:31 AM

Yes I also had a 'happy chucker'.
My first, in Tasmania so no family support and a twin tub washing machine.
He was  a big chubby baby,gaining weight, growing well and was not at all distressed by it so his GP wasn't concerned.
It didn't happen after every feed - I usually fed him to sleep so it never happened then, in fact it was always in situations when he was on the feed, play cycle and he often erupted a significant time afterwards.
There was one magnificent moment when we went home for the first time, went to church with my mum and as we were at the head of the aisle waiting for communion and he was smiling over my shoulder at the gooing congregation - blerch our it all came

I just took a few towels with me everywhere and lots of changes of clothes for us both. If someone wanted to hold the baby they got a towel first.
He eventually grew out of it sometime before his first birthday , probably about 6 or 7 months.

It's a horrible situation for you, the constant washing is soul destroying. But if he is doing all that he should and growing well just wait it out- don't rush into medical intervention for something that will right itself.
Of course if he is distressed or not growing act immediately

#18 Bono25

Posted 26 April 2020 - 08:41 AM

You could try lying down when you first start a feed, it can slow the let down. Otherwise it might be worth seeing a lactation consultant to check for tongue tie or other issues. Dd was a chucker, she had a posterior tongue tie and upper lip tie.
It's so frustrating when everyone tells you not to worry about it.

#19 -Emissary-

Posted 26 April 2020 - 04:45 PM

Thanks everyone.

I’m going back to my GP for DS1 flu shot next week and will have a chat to her this time instead of the nurse.

Definitely will check if he has a tongue tie as well.

View PostNot Escapin Xmas, on 26 April 2020 - 08:15 AM, said:

If your baby is otherwise growing well and happy, then I really wouldn’t worry about it (from your baby’s perspective anyway). I totally get that cleaning up vomit all the time is gross.

I think it’s hard to say whether it’s comfortable or not. From my perspective, it looks pretty uncomfortable as the vomit comes up quite forcefully but he does seem fine afterwards.

#20 FuzzyChocolateToes

Posted 26 April 2020 - 05:20 PM

View Post-Emissary-, on 26 April 2020 - 12:44 AM, said:


You’re describing us at the moment. I have a very fast let down and a decent supply. To the point the left boob actually sprays milk if DS unlatch during feed, which he does quite often if I give him that side. He prefers my right boob which has a slower flow.

Feeding is never more than 5 minutes and only ever on one side. The only time he doesn’t throw up is when he feeds at night. But then by 9 am, he would have woken up and already thrown up at least once. I’ve been thrown up on more times than I can remember in the last 4 months.
I had the same problem. If he pulled off, he got sprayed in the face! It was like a hose!

Quote

He has started sitting in his high chair in the last week but this hasn’t really helped.
It wasn't until he was sitting himself up independently that the vomiting settled down. He still vomited occasionally until 12mo.

#21 kerilyntaryn

Posted 26 April 2020 - 06:54 PM

Mine was a happy chucker too,  we always had to remember to put spare sets of clothes for everyone when we were out,  not just her.  It always lots a lot,  but it never affected her weight

#22 lucky 2

Posted 27 April 2020 - 08:45 PM

Was he born at term?
The ideal health professional, to talk to or visit, is probably a lactation consultant.
Does he make a clicking sound when he drinks, does he come off the breast coughing?
Did you have any nipple damage in the early days?
Does he tend to squash or stretch your nipple?
I'm wondering if his latch could be deeper, especially when he tends to come off the breast when your breast let's down. He may lose coordination with suck, swallow, breathe.

Don't answer my questions if you don't want to, I'm too nosey. :)


#23 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 27 April 2020 - 10:24 PM

My DD was a happy chucker, she vomited all the time, I wore a towelling dressing gown most of the time, then towels once it got warmer. They weren’t particularly forceful, but some were pretty big. Things got better after 6 months (I think their sphincter starts working about then), and a lot better once she was walking.

She had the under chin skin infections, and eczema was a continual problem until we worked out that she had an egg allergy (and I removed egg from my diet), and a lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is a funny one, some can’t tolerate any lactose, and others can tolerate some but have a limit and can have some ok. DD can tolerate quite a bit now she’s 5yo.

#24 -Emissary-

Posted 28 April 2020 - 12:29 AM

View Postlucky 2, on 27 April 2020 - 08:45 PM, said:

Was he born at term?
The ideal health professional, to talk to or visit, is probably a lactation consultant.
Does he make a clicking sound when he drinks, does he come off the breast coughing?
Did you have any nipple damage in the early days?
Does he tend to squash or stretch your nipple?
I'm wondering if his latch could be deeper, especially when he tends to come off the breast when your breast let's down. He may lose coordination with suck, swallow, breathe.

He was born on term.

He does make a clicking sound when he feeds during the day. He does latch on and off continuously during the day, which I’ve put down to him being distracted. He’s a lot better now because I only feed him when he’s ready for a nap and less distracted. During the night, he feeds without any clicking.

No nipple damage during the early days and doesn’t stretch my nipple.

Interestingly, he throws up after getting milk from the bottle as well so I’m not sure if it’s just a shallow latch on the breast. I use the pigeon wide neck teat and bottle.

Edited by -Emissary-, 28 April 2020 - 12:30 AM.


#25 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 28 April 2020 - 01:38 AM

DD1 was like this. Threw up after every feed. Virtually from day dot. Only settled down when she started solids and dropping milk feeds. She was exclusively breastfed, started solids just before 6 months (which was what was recommended at the time).

DD1 was 99th percentile consistently for length/height and weight, until she started walking (weight went down, height has always been 90+th percentiles since then)

After a few months, I did find that taking off some milk before DD1 had a go did seem to help a little bit.I had a huge supply with DD1, fairly sure it was shooting down her throat faster than she realised or could cope with. My flow/supply didn't really lessened with DD1 until she dropped all her night feeds. My supply was much more gentle and less "pressurised" when I had DD2, noticeable difference.  

If your baby putting weight on as expected, has wet nappies every day and is generally a happy and healthy baby, I wouldn't worry too much about it.

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 28 April 2020 - 01:39 AM.





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