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Yes I had a life once! *fluffy*


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#1 MadMarchMasterchef

Posted 09 April 2020 - 01:58 PM

Anyone ever find their kids are really suprised / disbelieving when you tell them stories of your life before kids?  

I travelled a fair bit when I was younger and I have been to some pretty amazing places around the world.  Yet when we see something on the news like a temple in South East Asia and I tell them that I have visited it, they seem to think Im joking!

I find this even more strange because as a family we go on a lot of camping adventures so its not like they never see me go anywhere!

#2 seayork2002

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:06 PM

Well DS was born overseas so has moved to Australia with us and came here on a visit when he was a baby, and we went back for a holiday a couple of years ago so he has been to Singapore a few times.

He has also been to all states (apart from NT) and gone camping with scouts etc. so he says he is bored of travel lol! but seriously though he has his own list of places he wants to go too himself.

He did say seriously though one day 'you know in the olden days back in the 80's'

Plus he suffers with his fathers 'when I was your age I was already down the mine for years' (he wasn't it is just a humour thing from where he is from' but I guess technology surprises him

'you mean you did not have a mobile when you were little?' type thing

#3 JRA

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:14 PM

it is funny, we as kids always knew mum and dad had a VERY different life before we were born, and like DH and I, they did not have kids until quite late - they were 37.

Now we are the same.  I think none of this comes as a surprise to DS, in fact, I think he knows "most" of our stories now.  Although every now and then we can surprise him with a new one.

#4 FiveAus

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:18 PM

Yes! Years ago I backpacked around Europe, and one of the things I did was to go through Checkpoint Charlie into East Berlin for the day.

A few years ago, we were watching a program about the Iron Curtain, and the Berlin Wall was mentioned and they showed Checkpoint Charlie. I commented that I'd been there when the wall was standing, and my kids were incredulous. Disbelieving at first, but fascinated when they realised I really had.

#5 *Spikey*

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:21 PM

I have a lot of international students in my class. They're really surprised when I've been able to say I've visited their home towns - and describe it, and share pics.  

DD is pretty blase about our travelling past - she asks if we've been to a place, if it comes up on the news or in some other context. Then complains, because she hasn't been there yet.

#6 Chocolate Addict

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:26 PM

My kid usually just rolls his eyes now lol

I lived a very interesting life and his two godfathers are gay men, including a drag Queen. We have stories, and he runs for cover when one of the Uncles is in town. :p

#7 PrincessPeach

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:29 PM

My kids still can't wrap their heads around the fact i didnt have internet at home growing up. We got the computer when i was in yr 8, then internet when i started year 12.

#8 *Spikey*

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:37 PM

I used to teach research skills - the old fashioned way, with books and card indexes and stuff.

DD gets all goggle-eyed when she hears about the no-tech days.

#9 LadyGreyTea

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:42 PM

My kids are shocked that Mummy and Daddy grew up with a PlayStation and a Tamagotchi.

I don't know if this counts but my very strait laced father apparently had a wild past - my uncle's tell me he started drinking and smoking at 12!

Edited by LadyGreyTea, 09 April 2020 - 02:44 PM.


#10 Lime-Polka-Dot

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:51 PM

View Postseayork2002, on 09 April 2020 - 02:06 PM, said:

'you mean you did not have a mobile when you were little?' type thing

I've more had these kind of moments. When we got the NBN connected it came with a phone line connection.
DD noticed the wall plug for a landline in the wall and asked "What's that?" I said "it's a phone plug" DD: "you mean for a phone charger?" I had to try and explain what a landline was.

#11 halcyondays

Posted 09 April 2020 - 02:59 PM

I have many skills, interests and hobbies that I gave up at a certain point because I “moved on” from that stage of my life- usually cos I got too busy.
My oldest only realised that I could speak other languages fairly recently when I was chatting to an acquaintance in their mother tongue,  and neither knew I could play a couple of instruments fairly well and were gobsmacked to hear me. It’s not as if I hadn’t told them - they didn’t believe me!

#12 wallofdodo

Posted 09 April 2020 - 03:06 PM

My son recently saw a picture of me from when I was 21 and living in London, he said WOW you were hardcore mum.

I wasn't really, just wore a lot of black!

#13 *Marty*

Posted 09 April 2020 - 03:06 PM

View Post*Spikey*, on 09 April 2020 - 02:37 PM, said:

I used to teach research skills - the old fashioned way, with books and card indexes and stuff.

DD gets all goggle-eyed when she hears about the no-tech days.

Goggle-eyed or google-eyed?????

#14 got my tinsel on

Posted 09 April 2020 - 03:07 PM

I know that I went up a lot in my then teenage DD's estimation when she found out that I had traveled extensively through the USA, Mexico and Canada all by myself in one very long trip.

#15 MooGuru

Posted 09 April 2020 - 03:45 PM

View PostFiveAus, on 09 April 2020 - 02:18 PM, said:

Yes! Years ago I backpacked around Europe, and one of the things I did was to go through Checkpoint Charlie into East Berlin for the day.

A few years ago, we were watching a program about the Iron Curtain, and the Berlin Wall was mentioned and they showed Checkpoint Charlie. I commented that I'd been there when the wall was standing, and my kids were incredulous. Disbelieving at first, but fascinated when they realised I really had.

It took quite some convincing of certain teens I know that the soviet bloc, berlin wall etc was really a thing.  They were convinced it was fictional.

#16 FiveAus

Posted 09 April 2020 - 03:49 PM

View PostMooGuru, on 09 April 2020 - 03:45 PM, said:

It took quite some convincing of certain teens I know that the soviet bloc, berlin wall etc was really a thing.  They were convinced it was fictional.

I was back there last month and it was surreal to see how it's changed. Berlin is a very different city these days.

#17 MadMarchMasterchef

Posted 09 April 2020 - 05:02 PM

View Post*Marty*, on 09 April 2020 - 03:06 PM, said:

Goggle-eyed or google-eyed?????

Or Goggle-box?  (tv show)   :p

#18 Murderino

Posted 09 April 2020 - 08:13 PM

My kids tell their friends I’ve been everywhere! I tell them I’ve been to a lot of places but there are LOTS more I haven’t seen.

DS is fascinated by the idea of me dating before I knew his dad!

#19 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 09 April 2020 - 08:41 PM

I remember being the same about my parents. It was only really when I got "old" that I appreciated how strange it was to not see them as ever having been anything other than Mum and Dad.

#20 Jingleflea

Posted 09 April 2020 - 10:17 PM

This thread just shows how boring my life has been lol.

Never travelled, married my first BF..

#21 nom_de_plume

Posted 09 April 2020 - 10:38 PM

Yep absolutely. I travelled a lot pre kids and they're always shocked.

Also trying to explain to my kids that mobile phones and the internet weren't really a *thing* until I'd almost finished high school. Social media didn't take off until after I'd finished my first uni degree.

They don't know what answering machines, VHS, Beta and Walkmans are. I blew my children's minds when I told them we only had 5 channels of TV back in the day and programming was offline overnight. We were lucky enough to have a roof aerial.

They'll also never know racing home from school to tape songs off the radio and making mix tapes for you friends, or being told off for dancing too enthusiastically near the record player and making it skip!

#22 Freddie'sMum

Posted 09 April 2020 - 10:47 PM

We didn't travel much pre-kids.  We had next to no money !

What does surprise the girls is when we talk about growing up and having one TV in the house, no mobile phones, no internet, old fashioned washing machines, they really don't understand what kind of life we had as kids.

They have SO much screen time across SO many devices, it's staggering.

#23 Sancti-claws

Posted 09 April 2020 - 11:01 PM

View PostPrincessPeach, on 09 April 2020 - 02:29 PM, said:

My kids still can't wrap their heads around the fact i didnt have internet at home growing up. We got the computer when i was in yr 8, then internet when i started year 12.
I was talking to my 20yo about when I went to uni and having to book a computer (often between midnight and dawn because there were over hundreds of business students (who, with the IT engineering students were the only computer people out of over 1000 students) and two computer labs with about 25 computers at an given time), put in your boot floppy disk and your program floppy disk to get to the work that you had saved (and the floppy disks were actually floppy).

We would not have been able to keep studying!!

And I had a life - although not much international travel - for many years before I became a mother.  They occasionally see pictures.

I have to remember that the 90s to them is what the 50s were to me.

#24 kadoodle

Posted 09 April 2020 - 11:15 PM

I was pretty shocked when I found out my parents were arrested for protesting against the draft for Vietnam.

My kids were pretty shocked when they found an old newspaper photo of me chaining myself to a bulldozer as part of an anti logging protest.

#25 Ivy Ivy

Posted 10 April 2020 - 08:30 AM

Younger people can't believe I did my uni degree before the internet.  The concept of having to memorise great swaths of information because I need it to do my job and it wasn't available at a finger touch bewilders them.




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