Jump to content

Educators - what do you think


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 27plus

Posted 19 March 2020 - 09:30 PM

I manage a small Centre.

I was surprised today by an ECT saying that they feel they are babysitters at the moment, waiting for the government to shut down Centres.

The ECT's interaction and delivery has not changed.

Other educators have not expressed this and I think were surprised by it as I was.

Addressing and supporting the ECT is in place.

Has your Centre experienced this?

#2 Lime-Polka-Dot

Posted 19 March 2020 - 09:43 PM

There have been mixed views in my workplace. (Sessional kindergarten) While we are open and expected to work we are doing so.

Many of us are anxious and the decreasing numbers throughout the week are adding to that for me personally. My anxiety wishes honestly to not be there and not send DD to school but I'm trying to remain calm and think rationally about the long term.

We only have one more week until school holidays (something Educators and most ECTs in LDC don't have to look forward to so I know we're lucky in that regard.)

ETA: But as far as expressing to management about feeling like we're just babysitting etc. no. We still actually feel lucky to even have jobs after a particularly rough change of management process from last year into this year.

Edited by Lime-Polka-Dot, 19 March 2020 - 09:48 PM.


#3 zenkitty

Posted 19 March 2020 - 09:49 PM

I’m saddened to hear educators feeling that way. I can see where it’s coming from, but the role of education and structure for kids is so much more than babysitting.

Children whose parents have to work outside of home at this time will be stressed and tired, being able to continue a familiar school routine and engage the mind is of huge benefit to kids.

School is also a huge protective factor for vulnerable kids - family violence goes up during times of emotional and financial stress. You’re protecting and nurturing our kids, not babysitting them.

#4 27plus

Posted 19 March 2020 - 10:03 PM

I think it is the uncertainty.  And I am happy that we have a work place that she feels she can say what she is thinking, although where she said it was not appropriate or supportive.

#5 Lime-Polka-Dot

Posted 19 March 2020 - 10:03 PM

View Postzenkitty, on 19 March 2020 - 09:49 PM, said:

I’m saddened to hear educators feeling that way. I can see where it’s coming from, but the role of education and structure for kids is so much more than babysitting.

Children whose parents have to work outside of home at this time will be stressed and tired, being able to continue a familiar school routine and engage the mind is of huge benefit to kids.

School is also a huge protective factor for vulnerable kids - family violence goes up during times of emotional and financial stress. You’re protecting and nurturing our kids, not babysitting them.

Early childhood educators and preschooler teachers in particular already have to fight so hard to explain the value in our work for fairly low pay, for people to liken us to little more than baby sitters as it is.

I have four year education degree just like primary school teachers but have to continuously justify the value of play based learning and that we are actually teachers too. Not to mention the vast discrepancies between awards for ECTs in LDC vs sessional kinder (up to $8 less an hour, up to 5 hours less planning and up to 7 weeks less leave)

It's truly appreciated when people like yourself express your understanding of our work but I think this ongoing battle is adding to our current feelings.

We have to keep sending our children to school to keep working while some others have the choice not to. We are putting ourselves and other family members at risk and feel we aren't being considered. I understand we are not alone in this much like retail and health staff at the moment.

I think the stresses we already endure are just increased at the moment.

#6 27plus

Posted 19 March 2020 - 10:58 PM

I started this post to hear what educators from ECTs through to trainees are experiencing.  

Pay discrepancy etc at the moment is not relevant.

I am more concerned with their mental health.

#7 tracey1966

Posted 20 March 2020 - 05:35 AM

I work as a casual educator so my shifts are starting to dry up. I am also feeling that the government will shut down centres soon Things kind of seem weird and unsettling and I am worried about a job I love not being there anymore

#8 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 20 March 2020 - 05:42 AM

I'm an 'old' ECT, DD is a primary teacher.

Universally I think all teachers are feeling this.

We are surrounded by people whose work is closing down and sending them home for safety, yet we are required to continue to work in many cases with no additional safety practices in place. In DD's case no sanitiser, cleaning supplies.

I was furious earlier this week when VIT emailed that their 'staff safety was paramount' so they were shutting up shop and going home. While we are on the front line. ELAA have also left us.

The gov't has described us as an essential service - to baby sit kids whose parents are health workers and to keep the economy going. Nothing about our work intrinsically being valuable.

At my kinder my priority is providing a safe haven for the children - but I don't think anyone official recognises this. The AEU have sent a very strongly worded letter to the government just last night pointing out that no educational institution can deliver the infection minimising requirements decreed for everyone else, so why aren't we getting any support?

I find it weird other educators have not expressed concern to be frank

#9 MrsLexiK

Posted 20 March 2020 - 05:56 AM

I just want to say thank you to all the teachers and educators. We are 50/50 on sending DS2 at the moment, he went yesterday and his mental health was so much better. Daily reflection that got sent to me had photos showing me they did what they do most days. He has a major speech disorder and association with his peers is so good for him (and other adults). DS1 I’m sending to learn (primary school), maybe I’m naive but I would hope schools would be as understanding for teachers for the teachers as they are for the students who can’t be there right now. Ie teachers that need to stay home do class planning, marking those that are able to are in the classroom physically. (This wouldn’t work with LDC I know). However our school and LDC/kinder are small centres. We are seaside coastal town.

I’m sorry your staff are struggling.

#10 Mmmcheese

Posted 20 March 2020 - 05:58 AM

I'm an ECT. I am anxious, which is making my patience less than it should be and making it hard to focus and concentrate. I'm trying to do business as usual, but I'm exhausted at all the emotional support I'm doing for colleagues, children, parents and my own family. I've kind of gone into 'wartime' mode, where I'm doing my bit to help the doctors, nurses and scientists do their bit, and that's the message I feel the government and trying to give us.

#11 spr_maiden

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:06 AM

Not a teacher,  hope it's ok to post here -
It was worrying to hear from a teacher friend that not once have they been asked "how are you feeling about all this? What do you need? How can we help?". It's been nothing but directives and no real recourse for reply/discussion.
I think poor leadership like this increases fear and uncertainty. I hope an outcome of the 'inevitable school at home for indefinite time' highlights how teaching is a skill set that is highly valuable and not something that anyone can do.
You're not babysitters.  You're amazing,  and my children adore their teachers and love learning with them.  You are a massive support in many ways to children,  and therefore their families. I'm sorry people minimise you.

#12 onetrick

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:31 AM

I'm a secondary teacher so at the other end. My students are generally more aware of hygiene but I'm worried if schools shut that there will be massive gaps of knowledge for some of the year levels especially, and the gap will widen between the haves and have nots. It is ignorant to think a podcast will replace what I do in a 70 minute teaching period- that might work for once a week for my seniors, but for my juniors it's more like 10 mins of talk and 60 mins roaming, checking up on them and personalised assistance.
I also hate the idea of working from home- not just for myself, but colleagues with multiple children. One of my much younger colleagues made the comment 'you will still get paid so you need to do the same work'- I offered to give him my 23mo for a couple of hours. Work will be done, but it will be different if we go off campus.
I also feel for those of you in ELC/ primary schools whose parents send sick kids cause they have to work not to get an educatio . Not fair for you :(

#13 Lime-Polka-Dot

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:40 AM

View Post27plus, on 19 March 2020 - 10:58 PM, said:

I started this post to hear what educators from ECTs through to trainees are experiencing.  

Pay discrepancy etc at the moment is not relevant.

I am more concerned with their mental health.

I was highlighting that this is already an extremely undervalued and highly stressful job on top of the current situation for those reasons. Which already impacts the mental health of employees. It's absolutely relevant whether you think so or not. You asked for the opinion of ECTs / educators and I provided mine.

#14 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:48 AM

The teachers and school support staff I know are all feeling this way. They feel undervalued and that the government doesn’t actually care about education.

By saying that they are keeping schools open because they will lose too many healthcare workers and the hypocritical kids cant go here because they might be carriers but it’s ok to pile them all into schools and expect teachers and support staff to risk themselves without any acknowledgment didn’t help one little bit!

#15 laridae

Posted 20 March 2020 - 07:04 AM

I'm not surprised that she's feeling like this. I don't want to send my kids to school, I don't want to go to work, I'm hanging out until they will let us work from home (they are working on it). I took a day off yesterday as I was just not coping. It does feel like we are all waiting until they close schools, so we can go home and practise the social distancing that they keep telling us about properly. I can't imagine its easy at the moment, I'm actually surprised that others are surprised that she said it, I can almost guarantee she's not the only one that is feeling it.

#16 EsmeLennox

Posted 20 March 2020 - 09:12 AM

It’s an unsurprising comment, given it’s basically what government leaders have said. We can’t close schools and ELCs, because who will look after the children?

#17 Kallie88

Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:08 AM

I'm a casual secondary teacher so I'm not getting shifts anymore. My dh is a centre manager in daycare and feels like they're just waiting for the call to shut to be made. He's already had to deal with a parent being diagnosed and having been in the centre that morning. His old work had a child in yesterday that's also just been diagnosed. Both centers are still open today.. Anxiety among staff is high, especially since most won't be paid if they shut unless they have sick/ annual leave to use. In such a female dominated industry most of those workers have used sick pay to stay home with sick kids etc so don't have much banked.
Talking to dd's kinder teacher, they're doing their best to keep things as normal as possible for the kids, but the anxiety is there too and they also feel like they're just waiting for the call and hoping nobody there gets infected and spreads it before then. They're asking for parents to donate tissues if they can because they've run out and can't get more supplies right now..

So the exact 'babysitting' sentiment hasn't been expressed to me directly, but given the way the government is treating them I'm not surprised at all. No thought or resources seems to be going to teachers at this time, they're just expected to keep going as normal pretending there's no risk to themselves, their families, or their students.

Edited by Kallie88, 20 March 2020 - 10:09 AM.


#18 IkeaAddict

Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:16 AM

An ECT who says they feel like a babysitter at the moment probably shouldn't be an ECT

#19 robhat

Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:53 AM

I can totally understand why the current discussions in the media would make a teacher feel this way. A lot of the talk is focused on the idea that 'someone has to look after the kids while parents work' and assumptions that kids would be all over the shopping centres if not at school. I suspect also the casual assumption from many parents that 'I'll just keep the kids at home and teach them myself' could easily communicate the idea that many don't see teachers as doing anything beyond what a parent could do themselves.

It would be way more helpful if people acknowledged that schools may very well have to shut at some point, for who knows how long and actually made some effort to ensure that learning can continue for ALL students and that risk to those vulnerable is removed as much as possible. While most kids won't get this virus badly (if at all) there are still a lot of unknowns, there are families with vulnerable adults at home, there are vulnerable teachers and there are also many cases of children needing to be picked up from school by grandparents or travel on public transport... And yes, the waiting is stressful for everybody, including the kids. Right now there seems to very much be an all or nothing response, which doesn't seem sensible. It should be obvious for example that many country schools should at this point be fine to stay open while some city schools quite possibly should have shut a week ago. It's also reasonable to suggest continuing school for year 12 students but setting up other grades to work from home or come into school for reduced hours as that could make social distancing within schools and public transport more feasible. But the focus should be on maintaining a reasonable level of education and actually talking to the teachers who do this as to how it could reasonably be managed, some of which may be school specific since we most certainly don't have a one size fit's all society!

But nah, teachers are just there to keep the kids away from the shopping centres while their parents do the important work. Make sure those kids wash their hands with the non existent soap and the small handful of available sinks...

#20 José

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:22 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 20 March 2020 - 10:16 AM, said:

An ECT who says they feel like a babysitter at the moment probably shouldn't be an ECT

This post is so disrespectful!!
ECT are already underpaid and undervalued.
Now in the current environment even my local radio station is broadcasting from their homes.
Yet ECT are expected to turn up every day. Never mind young children can't comprehend social distancing!
And what's  the rationale for keeping schools and daycare open? So parents can go to work. Not because the work us intrinsically important. But because workers need someone to watch their kids while they work.
ECT feel like baby sitters because thats how society and the government treat them and describe them- particularly now!

#21 wilding

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:56 PM

View PostIkeaAddict, on 20 March 2020 - 10:16 AM, said:

An ECT who says they feel like a babysitter at the moment probably shouldn't be an ECT

And you love your job 24/7? and don't think anything negative about it just even once? Must be nice and cruisey.

Edited by wilding, 20 March 2020 - 06:57 PM.


#22 newmumandexcited

Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:59 PM

I’ve mentioned it another thread so I’m beating a dead horse, but I’m a teacher and have never felt so disrespected and undervalued in my life.

I am part of a few fb groups and have quite a few teacher friends across the board in education and everyone is very upset. I stupidly thought I was valued a little more than this - not even as a professional, but as a person. Not once has the risk to teachers ever been acknowledged or discussed. I’m totally babysitting - how can there ever be anything else when 30% of students are out, all they talk about in class is Coronavirus and they are very very unsure. I don’t blame them but it’s poor management. I’m not a babysitter.

I think ECTs have it even harder - totally totally undervalued to begin with.

Edited by newmumandexcited, 20 March 2020 - 07:01 PM.


#23 Kallie88

Posted 20 March 2020 - 07:03 PM

View Postnewmumandexcited, on 20 March 2020 - 06:59 PM, said:

I’ve mentioned it another thread so I’m beating a dead horse, but I’m a teacher and have never felt so disrespected and undervalued in my life.

I am part of a few fb groups and have quite a few teacher friends across the board in education and everyone is very upset. I stupidly thought I was valued a little more than this - not even as a professional, but as a person. Not once has the risk to teachers ever been acknowledged or discussed. I’m totally babysitting - how can there ever be anything else when 30% of students are out, all they talk about in class is Coronavirus and they are very very unsure. I don’t blame them but it’s poor management. I’m not a babysitter.

I watched part of the press conference today and that asked of course, about schools and particularly about the risks to teachers, and teachers weren't even mentioned. All about not losing 30% of health care workers to minding kids and kids don't get sick 🙄 not surprising but sooo disappointing

#24 newmumandexcited

Posted 20 March 2020 - 07:04 PM

View PostMmmcheese, on 20 March 2020 - 05:58 AM, said:

I'm an ECT. I am anxious, which is making my patience less than it should be and making it hard to focus and concentrate. I'm trying to do business as usual, but I'm exhausted at all the emotional support I'm doing for colleagues, children, parents and my own family. I've kind of gone into 'wartime' mode, where I'm doing my bit to help the doctors, nurses and scientists do their bit, and that's the message I feel the government and trying to give us.

You’re doing amazingly and it’s a great attitude to have.

#25 Mmmcheese

Posted 20 March 2020 - 07:18 PM

View Postnewmumandexcited, on 20 March 2020 - 07:04 PM, said:



You’re doing amazingly and it’s a great attitude to have.

Thank you. The families have been incredibly supportive, and we do have a lot of people doing important work in all of this, so I'm comfortable with doing my bit to help. It's not my normal work exactly, but who is doing their normal work?




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.