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What’s your church/place of worship doing differently for coronavirus?


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#1 luke's mummu

Posted 08 March 2020 - 01:21 PM

Went to church this morning (Anglican) and the minister announced no shaking hands at the end of the service, no collection bowl passing (  bucket at the door as you leave) and morning tea will be a little different.........

Morning tea consisted of biscuit/cake individually wrapped, served by a person wearing gloves, using tongs and passed the package to you with tongs. Apparently the sydney discose head office has banned all home cooked food from church events.

And to top it off it was also “ fire evacuation “ Sunday for all services/ complete with minister in a fire hat/fleuro vest directing people around after the evacuation.

Seemed all crazy but I guess we get used to it!

Edited by luke's mummu, 08 March 2020 - 05:29 PM.


#2 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 08 March 2020 - 02:22 PM

Also Anglican (Melbourne)- Hadn't thought about morning tea. Hate the thought of the rubbish.

Much of our collection is electronic but we leave ours at the door during our service anyway, I think they still pass the plate at the other

We have not been sharing the chalice for the last 3 weeks - after I asked when we were going to adopt diocesan guidelines. Being from Sydney that's probably not an issue for you - lol.
She intincts the wafer and then passes it over.

Today they introduced no hand shaking.

We have never done a fire evacuation! Was it during a boring bit?

#3 luke's mummu

Posted 08 March 2020 - 02:39 PM

No the fire evacuation was right at the end- the Sunday school kids walked past the back door making “ woo-woo” noises and then it was announced ( was also in the newsletter the week previous)

Edited by luke's mummu, 08 March 2020 - 02:39 PM.


#4 Datrys

Posted 08 March 2020 - 05:14 PM

Each parish is supposed to do a fire drill at least once a year.
Umm... yeah.  Don't ask me how long it's been since we did one here.  :ph34r:

We aren't doing anything differently for coronavirus (yet).  I discussed it with the wardens, but we felt that the diocesan suggestions were over the top for such a small parish, at least for the time being.  And I am very confident that if I tried to implement them I'd have near-riots on my hands.

I have seen a slightly higher rate of people choosing an intincted wafer over sharing the cup.

#5 notsoretro

Posted 08 March 2020 - 05:20 PM

Sydney Anglican here and the Archbishop has issued guidelines for ministry and morning tea. I didn't go today but hope there wasn't a fire drill as it was also our AGM (Vestry meeting)!

#6 luke's mummu

Posted 08 March 2020 - 05:20 PM

View PostDatrys, on 08 March 2020 - 05:14 PM, said:

Each parish is supposed to do a fire drill at least once a year.
Umm... yeah.  Don't ask me how long it's been since we did one here.  :ph34r:

We aren't doing anything differently for coronavirus (yet).  I discussed it with the wardens, but we felt that the diocesan suggestions were over the top for such a small parish, at least for the time being.  And I am very confident that if I tried to implement them I'd have near-riots on my hands.

I have seen a slightly higher rate of people choosing an intincted wafer over sharing the cup.

Oh yeah I forgot about sharing the cup. We’ve only just moved to an Anglican Church after many years in Presbyterian- I have a feeling both churches do individual cups now. At least in sydney. Maybe different parishes do differently

#7 lizzzard

Posted 08 March 2020 - 05:21 PM

We took quite a few steps this week
1. Communion was served at the alter individually (we usually serve it in the pews on trays, passing it along)
2. We didn’t shake hands
3. Morning tea was packaged biscuits instead of the usual baked cookies etc
4. We had a reminder sent out this week not to attend services if we’d travelled to affected countries, been exposed etc

Our church is inner city Anglican.

#8 justbreath

Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:13 PM

We are also in a Sydney Anglican Church (very relaxed comparatively). We have a meal after the service I go to (cooked in the church building in bulk, different each week, feeds about 40 kids and 40-50 adults). That still went ahead as usual.

We also run a community soup kitchen type thing for anyone in need or who just wants company etc (but not soup usually lol). It’s still running.

There is a notice in the newsheet about not coming to church if you have any respiratory symptoms and being extra thorough with hand hygiene.

There was also an announcement that if anyone was desperate for toilet paper to feel free to take one from the church bathrooms lol.

I feel like they are being careful but not alarmist. Basically wash your hands, don’t come near others or to church if you have any symptoms of illness.

#9 8LittleAustralians

Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:27 PM

No shaking hands, pretty much only difference this morning.

In our temple, usually give a hug to those I know when i come in, but they are not doing that either. Lots of hand sanitiser around.

Sacrament and donations are unchanged, attended a baptism, nil changes to food serving.

Edited by 8LittleAustralians, 08 March 2020 - 06:27 PM.


#10 Gumbette

Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:27 PM

Buddhist ceremonies are now closed to the public in most Sydney monasteries for at least all of March. One I know of started live streaming on Facebook to allow people to “participate”.  Meditation sessions have also been cancelled.

#11 cardamom

Posted 08 March 2020 - 06:28 PM

Melbourne Jewish community here. I wrote an alert-not-alarmed bulletin on behalf of the board encouraging handwashing, respecting those who don't want to shake hands/hug, asking those with respiratory symptoms to stay home, etc. Other synagogues seem to have done similarly.

Sanitiser has been placed at the main entrance to the synagogue. Kiddush, I wasn't at shul this week so I'm not sure if that's being done differently but given one of our standard practices is for as many kids as possible to touch the challah during the blessing we probably need to change that...!

Tomorrow evening is the Purim event which is normally a big crowd of families, it will be interesting to see if numbers are lower.

#12 Datrys

Posted 08 March 2020 - 07:48 PM

View PostGumbette, on 08 March 2020 - 06:27 PM, said:

Buddhist ceremonies are now closed to the public in most Sydney monasteries for at least all of March. One I know of started live streaming on Facebook to allow people to “participate”.  Meditation sessions have also been cancelled.

Is that a big hardship for your community?  Or are there other ways for people to get their spiritual needs met appropriately?

Things would have to be very extreme, I think, before our community considered closing services altogether.

#13 luke's mummu

Posted 08 March 2020 - 08:03 PM

View PostGumbette, on 08 March 2020 - 06:27 PM, said:

Buddhist ceremonies are now closed to the public in most Sydney monasteries for at least all of March. One I know of started live streaming on Facebook to allow people to “participate”.  Meditation sessions have also been cancelled.

I’m interested as well gumbette- is there anything about Buddhist ceremonies that would make them more “ germ prone” than other religions? ( I hope that’s not an offensive thing to ask- I think the answer would be no). I thought Buddhism was mainly praying and meditating?

#14 suline

Posted 08 March 2020 - 08:26 PM

Catholic here- no holy water on entrance and exit of the church, offertory gifts in covered containers only, no sign of peace (No hug, handshake etc) communion wafer into the hand not the mouth, and no wine for congregation only the celebrant. And priest etc has to use alcohols based hand rub  or soap and water before and after distributing holy communion.

#15 Soontobegran

Posted 08 March 2020 - 08:56 PM

Sorry for intruding, I don't usually contribute here but I was attracted here by the topic and had a question.
I just thought sharing a chalice would be an absolute no at the moment and moving forward.
Are there still churches where this happens?

Edited by Soontobegran, 09 March 2020 - 09:30 PM.


#16 notsoretro

Posted 08 March 2020 - 09:13 PM

Not at mine, we've had individual little cups for as long as I've been there. Initially though, there was also the option of a shared cup but not now for many years

#17 Gumbette

Posted 08 March 2020 - 09:23 PM

Datrys said:

1583660934[/url]' post='18578732']
Is that a big hardship for your community?  Or are there other ways for people to get their spiritual needs met appropriately?

Things would have to be very extreme, I think, before our community considered closing services altogether.

luke said:

1583661838[/url]' post='18578747']
I’m interested as well gumbette- is there anything about Buddhist ceremonies that would make them more “ germ prone” than other religions? ( I hope that’s not an offensive thing to ask- I think the answer would be no). I thought Buddhism was mainly praying and meditating?

Lots of elderly all together in one room.  It would only take one case and it would be devastating.  You can still attend and worship day to day just not in a crowd.

ETA I pray at home at night on my own as do all my relatives.

Edited by Gumbette, 08 March 2020 - 09:26 PM.


#18 just roses

Posted 08 March 2020 - 09:25 PM

I’m at a CofE in London right now. No wine for communion, just wafers. No handshaking, lots of hand sanitiser, cakes etc under plastic sheets and servers using tongs to serve them.

#19 Expelliarmus

Posted 08 March 2020 - 11:50 PM

I didn’t attend today as I felt a bit under the weather but as far as I know not much has changed. We’ve had individual cups for sacrament (communion equivalent) longer than I’ve been alive and the bread is broken after using an alcohol wipe. Donations at electronic or in an envelope - no collection plate. We don’t have morning tea.

I haven’t heard a directive not to hug or shake hands but some congregations haven’t held meetings and some temples are currently closed - not in Australia though. I believe in Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and Italy. Im not sure how or if they actually hold worship meetings in China but any there would have been cancelled I expect.

We were told to prepare any needed supplies and to wash our hands really well in January but apart from that it seems to be business as usual for most of us.

#20 Catzilla

Posted 09 March 2020 - 05:26 AM

Church of Christ here.  As far as I know, my church isn't doing anything differently at the moment.

#21 rob^2

Posted 09 March 2020 - 07:04 AM

https://www.eternity...s-fears-spread/

I am a leader in K-2 kids church, with about 20 kids each week (whole kids program has about 100 kids) - our church staff are meeting tomorrow to work out how to implement the guidelines.
We were told we would have to wipe down all the pencils/textas before and after use - I am going to work out how not to use pencils and textas!!

#22 Odd-1-Out

Posted 09 March 2020 - 07:08 AM

Orthodox Christian Church, no changes at all and it's shared communion.

#23 Soontobegran

Posted 09 March 2020 - 07:48 AM

View PostOdd-1-Out, on 09 March 2020 - 07:08 AM, said:

Orthodox Christian Church, no changes at all and it's shared communion.

Again apologies as I understand this is a sensitive topic but does this not concern anyone given the virus is spread by droplet?

I would not even drink out of a cup and give it to a family member right now and I know where they've been and I have no general tendency to over react to these situations.

#24 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 09 March 2020 - 07:58 AM

In my 50+ years of church going - fairly high church Anglican we have only ever had a shared chalice.
At the beginning of February the Melbourne Diocese suggested it no longer be used, along with no handshakes etc.

Nothing changed in my parish so I asked that it be discussed at Parish council and after that the practice was abandoned.

So yes it concerns me
1. Saying we don't need to change because we are small or 'no visitors' is both racist and ignorant of the virus and it's effects.

2. Any church that doesn't take any measures will be targeted (rightly) as contributing to the spread. Religion really doesn't need more bad publicity.

3. Our congregation like many has an average age of about 105 - who suffers most from this?

#25 Odd-1-Out

Posted 09 March 2020 - 08:05 AM

View PostSoontobegran, on 09 March 2020 - 07:48 AM, said:



Again apologies as I understand this is a sensitive topic but does this not concern anyone given the virus is spread by droplet?

I would not even drink out of a cup and give it to a family member right now and I know where they've been and I have no general tendency to over react to these situations.

I think it does concern some people  but they have it drummed into them that there are no viruses in the body and blood of Christ and if they dont believe this that they shouldnt partake.




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