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Note to Teacher (Update post #44)


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#26 liveworkplay

Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:57 PM

View Postqak, on 23 February 2020 - 05:53 PM, said:

She's started in Yr 7 this year.



A new grade 7 I think their comments were harsh and a detention out of line. I would email stating the issue and that you expect there to be no penalty given and asking for an alternative way to submit rather then wasting resources printing work.

#27 NikiOne

Posted 23 February 2020 - 06:20 PM

I recall in year 7 having an incident that really wasn't fair - failed an essay because the margin was crooked (aka she refused to read it), the teacher read it when I rewrote it and then put it in the school magazine without my permission (the only written work from my year level). It was about our experience of escaping a bushfire. My mother was furious and still brings it up, my Dad said, yes the teacher is wrong but just rewrite it. It wasn't a bad lesson to learn.

#28 Just Jack

Posted 23 February 2020 - 07:11 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 23 February 2020 - 05:50 PM, said:

What grade?

In primary school I told each of my kids teachers at the beginning of the rule I did not believe in homework, there was no evidence for its benefit and unless they were not finishing their set class work they I would not be monitoring them completing it and they were not to be punished because of it.

In high school I would leave it to my child but surely there is an alternative way to submit it?

How did the teachers respond to that?

#29 José

Posted 23 February 2020 - 07:56 PM

View PostJust Jack, on 23 February 2020 - 07:11 PM, said:



How did the teachers respond to that?

I would think the teachers would be glad to know where the parent stands.
Many teachers only send homework home because parents demand it.

#30 robhat

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:08 PM

I'd refrain from writing notes to the teacher once your child is in high school unless it's a really serious issue. Instead discuss with your child a range of options for solving the problem and help her with whatever she decides. It's worth teaching kids that they are expected to make every effort to be responsible and that excuses should be left for times when things really are impossible or something more important has to take priority.

#31 MadMarchMasterchef

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:12 PM

View PostDemera, on 23 February 2020 - 03:58 PM, said:

I'm kinda with the teacher.  It's a problem solving opportunity. There are other ways..... eg hotspot to phone, go to the library (public library), use a friend or neighbour's internet, use public WIFI, etc etc.

I agree with this up to a point.

But it depends on when the internet went down and how long they had to do the assignment. After all adults often run late for work for circumstances beyond their control.

#32 Expelliarmus

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:13 PM

Detention for not completing homework is inappropriate and I make no bones about it to primary teachers and that I do not expect consequences for the lack of it. I did once write I did not expect or give permission for my children in Years 7, 6 and 4 to be kept in at lunchtime to read aloud during the whole school push to improve student reading levels. I outlined my reasons to the principal including our specific family situation at the time and what I expected.

I wouldn’t say something like that if it was an unfinished high school assignment that hadn’t been handed up because the child was lazy/hadn’t been bothered/etc. but with an actual reason like ‘it has been done the teacher is just being a d*ck about it’ (which is the case here - it’s a flipping Google Doc!) then yeah I’d get adversarial even in high school.

I loathe homework ...

#33 Meepy

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:51 PM

We don’t give detention for late homework.  Instead we have homework club which is supervised by a teacher that can assist with the work.  In high school not being able to print, left laptop at home, can’t find my document online, computer battery flat etc. are reasons we hear everyday for not completing work in class or finishing off work at home.  If it can’t be printed it should be transmitted electronically and accepted that way.

#34 qak

Posted 23 February 2020 - 08:54 PM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 23 February 2020 - 08:13 PM, said:

an actual reason like ‘it has been done the teacher is just being a d*ck about it’

I think this is my main concern - it's not an appropriate response when the "work" was done, and there were circumstances out of her control that stopped her from printing it. It didn't occur to me that a note would be required to excuse it not being printed, because it was easy for him to see it had been done.

And FFS - it's a title page!

#35 PuddingPlease

Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:01 PM

View PostDemera, on 23 February 2020 - 03:58 PM, said:

I'm kinda with the teacher.  It's a problem solving opportunity. There are other ways..... eg hotspot to phone, go to the library (public library), use a friend or neighbour's internet, use public WIFI, etc etc.

I feel like there's a problem with this argument. Problem solving opportunities like this are going to be a lot easier to solve if you live in a neighbourhood where you have friendly neighbours with their own home office set-ups and working printers and when your parents can drive you to the library or to Officeworks. I doubt any of our neighbours own a printer (small houses), I haven't had one at home in years and I can't drive so my daughters ability to "problem solve" would be far more hampered by practical considerations than yours if it was just us.

I'm actually a bit baffled that a home printer seems to be required at all though I accept that the kids could normally print off work in the school library. Given that it is the start of year 7 and the kids cannot print at school yet (no student cards), it seems unnecessarily harsh to me to be handing out detentions.

#36 JRA

Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:08 PM

i have to say I am intrigued by the need for a printer. I know quite a lot of people without a printer at home with secondary age kids.

#37 Freddie'sMum

Posted 23 February 2020 - 09:24 PM

So when an adult is late for work because of a power outage (completely beyond their control) they deserve to get the adult version of a detention? Everybody understands that there are circumstances beyond your own control and even with the very best planning in the world, sh*t still happens.  

The year 7 student has done the required homework.  The teacher is being unnecessarily pedantic about the printing out of the homework (in my opinion).

#38 amdirel

Posted 23 February 2020 - 10:26 PM

Our high school states that technology issues are not an acceptable excuse for late homework/assignments. I mean I get that kids probably make up excuses all the time, but honestly if we had a genuine technology failure I would likely have NFI what to do!

#39 liveworkplay

Posted 24 February 2020 - 04:54 PM

View PostJust Jack, on 23 February 2020 - 07:11 PM, said:

How did the teachers respond to that?

Every teacher has been fine with it. I have 3 kids, currently in years 10, 8 and 5. It has never been an issue and most teachers have commented that they agreed with me. As an aside, all my kids read for pleasure, so I do not count reading as home work.

#40 CrankyM

Posted 24 February 2020 - 05:08 PM

View PostJRA, on 23 February 2020 - 09:08 PM, said:

i have to say I am intrigued by the need for a printer. I know quite a lot of people without a printer at home with secondary age kids.

Yeah me too. We don't have a printer. Does this mean I will need to get a printer along with everything else for highschool?

I mean, while computers are incredibly common now, I can count on one hand the numbers of people I know who have a printer...

#41 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 24 February 2020 - 06:02 PM

View PostFreddie, on 23 February 2020 - 09:24 PM, said:

So when an adult is late for work because of a power outage (completely beyond their control) they deserve to get the adult version of a detention? Everybody understands that there are circumstances beyond your own control and even with the very best planning in the world, sh*t still happens.  

The year 7 student has done the required homework.  The teacher is being unnecessarily pedantic about the printing out of the homework (in my opinion).

Frankly plenty of us get worse than a detention.  Some get docked money or miss out on a job altogether.  At the other end of the scale, you could seriously stuff up someone’s year if you miss a legal case or a surgery or a wedding.   Sure it might get postponed but how would you feel if that happened to you.  

Threatened with a detention means didn’t actually get a detention.  That is “next time you need to make other arrangements to print it, or ....”.  

Maybe the kid could make a deal with a friend that they will print for each other in an emergency?  




#42 qak

Posted 24 February 2020 - 06:26 PM

It's two warnings and you get a detention; this was to count as the first.

Anyway I sent a note to the teacher explaining it was beyond DDs control ... I'm not expecting a reply.

And I think DD was so shocked she won't ever be risking a detention again; maybe there is a silver lining. She is a very compliant student, she's not ever going to cause trouble at school.

#43 Julie3Girls

Posted 25 February 2020 - 07:55 PM

Honestly, think it is a bit harsh, considering it could have easily have been proven. Even if the teacher had her show him online during break time (to avoid using class time). So not a detention, simply a solution to the problem.

Generally speaking, if we were in those circumstances, I wold have written a note for Dd to take with her - the whole technology blame is a bit too easy for kids to use, and I’m sure teachers have heard it all. So having a parent confirmation of internet outage would have supported her story.

Beyond that, see it as a learning opportunity, especially to someone in year 7. In senior years, the rules for assessments become so strict, requiring special consideration forms etc if assessments are late.
So yr 7 is a good time to start getting into the right habits.
.. always try and get assessments completed (including printing) a couple of days before the due date.  So if something goes wrong, like the printer not working, you have time to find an alternative. That alternative can include going to the teacher and explaining the situation BEFORE the due date if you absolutely can’t print it.
.. always always back up all school work so there is a copy on the computer and a USB stick. Especially anything you need to hand in digitally. One of my girls was burnt with that one - handed in assignment on USB, and it wouldn’t read.  The only backup we had was incomplete.

#44 qak

Posted 11 March 2020 - 08:12 PM

Just to update - I never heard from the teacher ... but DD got a merit for her title page, LOL.




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