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Overhanging Fruit Tree


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#1 GreenEgg

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:38 PM

If you had a fruit tree that had overhanging branches that went across the fence in to your neighbours yard would you think that you had a right to the fruit over the fence?  Or would you allow your neighbours to enjoy the fruit? Or would you enter their property when they weren't home and pick it?

#2 Mumsyto2

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:50 PM

Your neighbours get the fruit. Anything else is a d!ck move.

I assume if your neighbours had an issue with it overhanging they would say something about rectifying it or just rectify it themselves by cutting back to the fence line.

#3 Kiwi Bicycle

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:53 PM

I thought the branches and fruit are the tree's owners  as if you cut a branch you should return to the owner. Same with fruit. I would trim the overhanging branch and collect your fruit and solve any future issues.

#4 Romeo Void

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:54 PM

Neighbour gets the fruit in my books

#5 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:54 PM

Ooh I’ve been wondering this.  I’m faithfully watering a passionfruit vine (with reclaimed shower water) and Id love to know whether the back neighbours are eating the fruit or letting it rot.   If it’s the latter I want it.  

I never see them out there, just their dog.  And I’m too embarrassed to walk round to the next street and door knock and sound deranged.

#6 IamtheMumma

Posted 14 January 2020 - 05:58 PM

Neighbour gets the fruit.  If the owner of the tree doesn't want to share, they need to cut down the branches that hang over.

Entering the yard to pick fruit is dodgy and illegal (trespass).

#7 luke's mummu

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:02 PM

The neighbours have the right to take the fruit and overhanging branches and do whatever they like with them. Can throw the branches back over the fence if they wish

#8 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:03 PM

neighbours get the fruit.  And id take it if it overhung my yard.

Obviously going into someone elses property is wrong, illegal, and silly.  if your tree is overhanging so much that you cant harvest the fruit, prune the damn tree.

#9 LittleMissPink

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:03 PM

Dont enter their property.
Ask them if they want the fruit.
If they dont, ask if you can pick it.
If they do, let them enjoy it.

If you dont want your fruit over the fence, trim the tree.

Be neighbourly.

#10 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:07 PM

Neighbour gets the fruit, how is this even a question.

If you don’t want to share, cut your tree back.

Definitely don’t enter their property - that’s trespassing!!

#11 Hands Up

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:08 PM

Neighbors get the fruit

#12 Mumsyto2

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:10 PM

View PostKiwi Bicycle, on 14 January 2020 - 05:53 PM, said:

I thought the branches and fruit are the tree's owners  as if you cut a branch you should return to the owner. Same with fruit. I would trim the overhanging branch and collect your fruit and solve any future issues.

Surely that doesn’t give someone the right to trespass on someone else’s property to collect the fruit? The OP states they would have to do this. Not sure if they could cut from their side and pull back to them?

We have a neighbour with fruit trees bordering, very thick and dense and no way they could even get to their fence line to cut back from their own side. We enjoyed the fruit and when it encroached too much we trimmed back from our side but so there was still a fair bit of overhang to provide fruit. No point chucking the trimmed stuff back over as the other side was so dense, you have to be an Olympic discus thrower to try and get it over and even then you’d struggle or it would end up on the top of trees on the fence line. No way were we carting the trimmed stuff across our property, up the drive, across over to their property, down their drive to their front door.

We came home one day and it had all been trimmed back on our side right back to arms length over the fence line into their property. The only way it could have been done was from our side, as they couldn’t get to the fence on their side. We hadn’t been spoken to about this, we hadn’t given permission to come into our property do this (front years so no fence but they needed to walk down our drive and across the front lawn to fence line), we certainly didn’t want it trimmed back which we felt we could control given they couldn’t do it from their side. It was also noted they only trimmed back our side, never touched theirs! Also plentiful fruit on their side so they were not lacking. It was just the thought of anyone else having any they didn’t seem to be able to handle. We made it well known they were never to trespass on our property again.

Edited by Mumsyto2, 14 January 2020 - 06:13 PM.


#13 laridae

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:14 PM

Neighbour gets the fruit if they want it. If they don't, offering to pick it or trim the tree back would probably be a good idea. So they don't get spoiled fruit on their ground.

I'd love to go pick my neighbour's neighbour tree. The have a big apricot tree and I can see it hanging over the neighbours fence. And they never pick it!
But I think that would be weird to ask and I'm not about to just go over there and do it.

Edited by laridae, 14 January 2020 - 06:14 PM.


#14 laridae

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:23 PM

Oops think I read that wrong.

Edited by laridae, 14 January 2020 - 06:25 PM.


#15 kimasa

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:23 PM

Neighbour gets the fruit.

#16 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:25 PM

View Postlaridae, on 14 January 2020 - 06:23 PM, said:


Lol.  I'm not surprised. You basically declared war by dumping the trimmings on their doorstep. They obviously thought you didn't want the trees overhanging at all. And you thought it fine to trespass on their property to dump the branches, so I'm not surprised they thought it would be ok to go onto yours to finish the job.

If you'd wanted to keep the fruit on your side it would have been better to dispose of the trimmings yourself.

She says that no way were they doing that due to the distance?

That’s how I read that it anyway.

Edited by ~Jolly_F~, 14 January 2020 - 06:26 PM.


#17 PoolsideMasterchef

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:26 PM

Maybe ask the neighbour if they want it?  Legally its theirs

#18 KwaziiCat

Posted 14 January 2020 - 06:47 PM

We have a neighbours fruit tree overhanging our fence. We pick the fruit and also share with others as there is so much on there & it would be a complete waste otherwise.  I opened a 2nd story window the other day and can literally pick fruit from in there.  It's awesome! We just trim back our side when it gets close to touching the house.

I would think it was really weird if the neighbours told us we couldn't pick the fruit...seems like a no brainer to me.

#19 GreenEgg

Posted 14 January 2020 - 07:08 PM

We are the neighbours.  I had been eye off the apricots, plums and nectarines for a couple of weeks waiting for them to ripen enough to pick, the first overhanging branch was stripped last week, and the rest taken today while we weren’t home.  The tree is in their backyard but our front yard.  They have entered our yard every year to take the fruit and trim the trees without asking. Just was wondering if my thoughts were wrong.  We are moving soon, won’t be sad to see the back of them!

#20 Gudrun

Posted 14 January 2020 - 07:21 PM

The fruit is the neighbours' fruit.  Legally.   Taking fruit from over the fence is stealing and going onto their property uninvited is trespassing.

Edited by Gudrun, 14 January 2020 - 07:23 PM.


#21 -Emissary-

Posted 14 January 2020 - 07:31 PM

I can’t imagine being that hung up on fruit hanging off the tree on the other side of the fence and not being able to stand someone else enjoying the fruit just because the tree is yours. It seems so petty.

I’m firmly in camp “let the neighbours enjoy it”.

My mum has a lemon tree in her backyard, she practically begs people to take lemon off her..

Edited by -Emissary-, 14 January 2020 - 07:33 PM.


#22 Mumsyto2

Posted 14 January 2020 - 07:40 PM

View PostGreenEgg, on 14 January 2020 - 07:08 PM, said:

They have entered our yard every year to take the fruit and trim the trees without asking. Just was wondering if my thoughts were wrong.  We are moving soon, won’t be sad to see the back of them!

And you have never told them NOT to do this because.......

#23 Christmas tree

Posted 14 January 2020 - 08:13 PM

View PostMumsyto2, on 14 January 2020 - 07:40 PM, said:



And you have never told them NOT to do this because.......
Seriously if they (the neighbours) are that petty who could be bothered.
OP they are being ridiculous though!

#24 Mumsyto2

Posted 14 January 2020 - 08:31 PM

View PostChristmas tree, on 14 January 2020 - 08:13 PM, said:


Seriously if they (the neighbours) are that petty who could be bothered.

Well I suppose if you are not bothered by people trespassing and being d!icks then you wouldn’t bother. I’m pretty clear that I don’t want people trespassing and doing stuff without my express permission so I do bother, irrespective of how petty they may or may not be.

#25 Grinchette

Posted 14 January 2020 - 08:35 PM

View PostGreenEgg, on 14 January 2020 - 07:08 PM, said:

We are the neighbours.  I had been eye off the apricots, plums and nectarines for a couple of weeks waiting for them to ripen enough to pick, the first overhanging branch was stripped last week, and the rest taken today while we weren’t home.  The tree is in their backyard but our front yard.  They have entered our yard every year to take the fruit and trim the trees without asking. Just was wondering if my thoughts were wrong.  We are moving soon, won’t be sad to see the back of them!

I would have trimmed the tree every year and saved them the hassle.




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