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Riverview (St Ignatius College) Lane Cove


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#1 Grinchette

Posted 13 January 2020 - 12:44 PM

I'm hoping to enrol DS, starting Y5 (2023).  I will put his name down this year - he will be in Y2.  Wondering if anyone's son currently attends the school and if it was it hard gaining enrolment.  (We aren't Catholics) DS is on the Spectrum (with no intellectual disability, but does have speech delay) and I am particularly taken with their Learning Enrichment program and acceptance that not everyone will wish / be able to attend Uni.  I also like that they don't offer scholarships for the smartest kids, instead offering bursary's for those who have don't have the financial means to attend.  Our current school isn't inclusive of anyone with any type of disability - physical or otherwise.

Any feedback on the school or others around the area would be great.

#2 Kreme

Posted 13 January 2020 - 12:55 PM

My understanding is that it is difficult to get in if you’re not catholic. He must be baptised or they won’t even consider him.

I live locally to this school and know lots of people who attend. They’re all catholic. The grounds are amazing. Most parents seem to love it but it doesn’t suit everyone. There is a huge emphasis on sport and I know a couple of non sporty kids who’ve left. A friend sent her son in year 5 and said those 2 years were a waste of money, that he was catered to better at his small catholic primary school and she wishes she’d waited til yr 7. I don’t know anyone who is in the learning support program so I can’t give you feedback on that, sorry.

#3 seayork2002

Posted 13 January 2020 - 01:00 PM

View PostKreme, on 13 January 2020 - 12:55 PM, said:

My understanding is that it is difficult to get in if you’re not catholic. He must be baptised or they won’t even consider him.

I live locally to this school and know lots of people who attend. They’re all catholic. The grounds are amazing. Most parents seem to love it but it doesn’t suit everyone. There is a huge emphasis on sport and I know a couple of non sporty kids who’ve left. A friend sent her son in year 5 and said those 2 years were a waste of money, that he was catered to better at his small catholic primary school and she wishes she’d waited til yr 7. I don’t know anyone who is in the learning support program so I can’t give you feedback on that, sorry.

Yeah my mum lives close to that school, I agree with your points, I have known of kids who go there but non in the support program, this is an observation but I am actually surprised they have one to be honest

#4 Grinchette

Posted 13 January 2020 - 01:04 PM

I'm only looking at enrolling him in Y5 as I figured everyone wants to wait until Y7 so there will be less places available.  We definitely won't baptise him just for the purposes of enrolment though...

#5 Kreme

Posted 13 January 2020 - 02:24 PM

You don’t have to be baltised Catholic, but just baptised in your chosen religion. If you have a look at the website I’m pretty sure it says that’s a non negotiable.

I do prefer their enrolment policy as they consider everyone’s application equally rather than doing the first in best dressed approach. So if you could put together a compelling application as to why you wanted him to attend the school then you might be in with a chance. Just be aware it’s a very popular school so I’d have a backup. Marist seems to be popular around here but I don’t know anything about it. There’s a total lack of non catholic private schools in this area apart from Shore that you have to apply to at birth. I know some people who got into Redlands by starting in year 5.

I know someone who used to be a learning support teacher at Joeys and was quite positive about it so that might be worth a look but it’s probably similar to Riverview in terms of popularity.

#6 Grinchette

Posted 13 January 2020 - 02:31 PM

Joeys is also on the list - we are friends with a current support teacher there.  Principal's daughter is SN's so is a huge believer in inclusion.  I just hope he's still there in 2025 though!  A school won't walk the walk unless it comes from the top regardless of what their website says.  We're Buddhists - so I don't know what we would do in terms of being baptised in a chosen religion?  Do you mean if you're a Christian?

DD is going to a Catholic independent high school next year but only got in on the strength of her NAPLAN results which I doubt will be an option for DS.

Edited by Grinchette, 13 January 2020 - 02:31 PM.


#7 Kreme

Posted 13 January 2020 - 02:37 PM

I think what they are really looking for is that you practice your chosen religion? I’d just address that in the application and also that you have a child already attending a catholic school so you are comfortable supporting the ethos, blah blah.

#8 Trevor Trove

Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:25 AM

don't  worry about the religion - just apply honestly and see what they come back with. :)

#9 JBH

Posted 16 January 2020 - 11:41 AM

From boys I have known who have been there, it is a lovely school, inclusive and socially progressive type of Catholics. I wouldn’t hesitate to send my boys there if we were Christian, but we are not and the Christian ethos of the school is very strong. I think they would prefer a practising Buddhist to an atheist, but all you can do is ask.

Just a word of warning - a uni friend of mine who was the daughter of Buddhists went to a catholic school and chose to convert. In her 40s she remains a staunch Catholic and it has been challenging for her family (her sister also went to the school and didn’t convert).

#10 Grinchette

Posted 16 January 2020 - 12:27 PM

View PostJBH, on 16 January 2020 - 11:41 AM, said:

Just a word of warning - a uni friend of mine who was the daughter of Buddhists went to a catholic school and chose to convert. In her 40s she remains a staunch Catholic and it has been challenging for her family (her sister also went to the school and didn’t convert).

LOL this is my fear.  DD is great, she currently attends a Christian school and is respectful (as she's been taught to), but so many of their teachings in relation to creation, same sex marriage, single parenting, just don't sit right with her so I'm pretty safe.  Her best friend's family is going through the same thing.  Children of Catholics - youngest has gone hard core and believes everything.  Older daughter (DD's best friend) doesn't believe a word and is very outspoken.  Dinner times are fun!

DS not so sure about.  But thanks for the heads up.  

And yes they do seem to be quite socially progressive - I got that impression from a couple of past parents - their children attended 10 yrs ago and (also when I read the Barefoot Surgeon - who was also a Buddhist) - that the Jesuit branch of Catholics are quite accepting of differences.

Edited by Grinchette, 16 January 2020 - 08:17 PM.


#11 Lucrezia Bauble

Posted 16 January 2020 - 12:33 PM

Tony Abbot and Barnaby went there....i’d look at Joeys...


#12 Grinchette

Posted 16 January 2020 - 12:43 PM

 Lucrezia Bauble, on 16 January 2020 - 12:33 PM, said:

Tony Abbot and Barnaby went there....i’d look at Joeys...

You do know how to ruin the glow...

To be fair they've publicly come out against Abbott on the issue of asylum seekers.  Forgot Barnaby went there.  I don't even want DS using the same toilets!

https://www.smh.com....0821-2savt.html

Edited by Grinchette, 16 January 2020 - 12:50 PM.


#13 Moukmouk

Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:15 PM

It is incredibly competitive to get into the learning support program. I have a friend with a child in the program and it has been amazing for him (also on the spectrum). It’s certainly worth a try, but I don’t think I would send a child with special needs there in the mainstream program. Joeys has a better track record of inclusiveness. I know someone starting at Marist this year so could update later. I’m not sure where you are based but St Andrews in the city and Trinity at Summer Hill also have good reputations for being good for some kids with ASD

#14 Grinchette

Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:32 PM

DS is on the spectrum, but his main area is speech delay.  As far as academics goes he's travelling ahead of his year level.  I really just wanted a school that is accepting and inclusive as he I'm sure there will be challenges even if he doesn't actually require an ongoing learning support program.

We're in Hunters Hill, so Joey's is good, CBD not so much.  We will put his name down at Trinity also as they have a bus so travel won't be an issue.    

Thank you

#15 JBH

Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:37 PM

Also don’t rule out public education. Friends of my boys tried two different private schools for their boys with ASD on the basis of their promises of support and acceptance of difference. Once they landed on public as a last resort they realised it was far, far better for their kids. I know other people have had different experiences, but definitely worth looking at.

#16 Grinchette

Posted 16 January 2020 - 01:49 PM

I will be pulling DS (Y2) out of our current private school and enrolling him in public, so definitely not ruling anything out.  (For much the same reason as your friend - "please come & we'll support you - oh until we become too popular and it becomes too hard at which point we won't...")

I'm not sure our local high school is right for him unfortunately.  Also DH really wants to keep it fair - DD will have been in private K-12.

#17 MooGuru

Posted 16 January 2020 - 02:08 PM

Don't forget that fair means the best education for them as individuals rather than a price tag (I have a friend who really struggled with fair with one child attending a top private and the other public).

I know one child who went to Riverview as a boarder on one of their programs for people from disadvantaged backgrounds so didn't need to pay fees or something. He thrived there but he probably would have thrived anywhere there was structure and routine.

I believe it's Riverview that hosts a camp along with the Sony foundation for kids with disabilities during the summer school holidays. I've heard good things about that from someone whose child had their first successful few days away from home there.
So that's a plus from my perspective in terms of inclusiveness as part of their ethos.

*I know nothing about the school/location/grounds beyond being acquainted with 2 people who have mentioned it.

Edited by MooGuru, 16 January 2020 - 02:09 PM.


#18 Moo point

Posted 16 January 2020 - 03:30 PM

Our DS is 7 and going into Year 2 this year at one of the local public schools. His zoned high school is (currently) Hunters Hill, which I presume is the same for you? I've heard mixed things, but far more positive more recently. DS is autistic with a speech delay too, and is behind academically, so it's something we have to think about over the next few years. But I think he'd prefer a co-ed school, and quite frankly the cost of these elite private schools is a bit beyond us. So at this stage I have high hopes that HHHS will be suitable for him!

#19 Grinchette

Posted 16 January 2020 - 06:44 PM

Hey Moo Point DS is going into Y2 this year too at our local public too(yet to enrol him), but we’re hoping he’ll transition in term 2.  And yes our local is HHH.

ETA we would have enrolled him (actually both kids in our local public) to begin with, except the Principal at the time was a right royal cow.  Every ASD family we knew that started there ended up leaving within 2 years of starting. Luckily she’s now ‘retired’ and things are looking up. Apparently “...SN’s kids are too much work, so you need to make yourself known now (at the information evening), so we can work out how to deal with them”.

Good luck!

Edited by Grinchette, 16 January 2020 - 08:07 PM.


#20 QuirkyMum

Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:36 PM

View PostMoukmouk, on 16 January 2020 - 01:15 PM, said:

It is incredibly competitive to get into the learning support program. I have a friend with a child in the program and it has been amazing for him (also on the spectrum). It’s certainly worth a try, but I don’t think I would send a child with special needs there in the mainstream program. Joeys has a better track record of inclusiveness. I know someone starting at Marist this year so could update later. I’m not sure where you are based but St Andrews in the city and Trinity at Summer Hill also have good reputations for being good for some kids with ASD
St Andrews good in what way?
Learning support and providing extention? Accepting that not everyone will go to uni? Or providing support yet still pushing to accomplish more?
I have an autistic 10 year old who needs both support ( for group activities mostly) and extention.
Thanks!

#21 Ivy Ivy

Posted 16 January 2020 - 07:52 PM

Yes I agree St Andrews city is very good at catering to kids who haven't always fitted in at their other schools.

Trinity are good with their TAFE ties re not everyone going to uni.

Knox staff are impressive with supporting differences and being flexible, though I'm not sure what the culture at the boys'/playground level is.

Pius at Chatswood going fine for my friend's sons.

St Leo's at Wahroonga is small and progressive.

The new Seventh day Adventist school at Wahroonga next to the SAN hospital has a reputation of currently pouring resources into the school to build it up, I'd look into that, my neighbour's kids go and he loves it (he isn't that religion).

One of my close friends is a Riverview boy and loved it.  The Jesuits encourage questioning and logical challenging.

You know the saying is at Joey's you give your boy to them and then rarely see him.  I've heard even day boys stay till 8pm or something in study hall weeknights (high school), not sure if that's true.

#22 JBH

Posted 16 January 2020 - 08:03 PM

View PostIvy Ivy, on 16 January 2020 - 07:52 PM, said:

Yes I agree St Andrews city is very good at catering to kids who haven't always fitted in at their other schools.

Trinity are good with their TAFE ties re not everyone going to uni.

Knox staff are impressive with supporting differences and being flexible, though I'm not sure what the culture at the boys'/playground level is.

Pius at Chatswood going fine for my friend's sons.

St Leo's at Wahroonga is small and progressive.

The new Seventh day Adventist school at Wahroonga next to the SAN hospital has a reputation of currently pouring resources into the school to build it up, I'd look into that, my neighbour's kids go and he loves it (he isn't that religion).

One of my close friends is a Riverview boy and loved it.  The Jesuits encourage questioning and logical challenging.

You know the saying is at Joey's you give your boy to them and then rarely see him.  I've heard even day boys stay till 8pm or something in study hall weeknights (high school), not sure if that's true.
.

I think the Joey’s program you mention is “day boarding”. It’s an optional extra - one of my colleagues has chosen it for her son. They stay after school, have afternoon tea, sports training, supervised homework and dinner and are picked up at 8pm ready for leisure time, shower and bed. This particular colleague previously had a nanny and was attracted to this approach.

#23 Grinchette

Posted 17 January 2020 - 08:28 AM

Pretty sure Joey's day finishes at 5.00 pm (they either have sport or extra tutoring after school).  Like PP said 8.00 pm is an optional extra for those parents who don't get home until late.  Everything is done so when you pick them up you can spend quality time with them before bed without worrying about anything else.  Great idea in my opinion if you have the need & the money.

#24 Lallalla

Posted 17 January 2020 - 11:27 AM

View PostLucrezia Bauble, on 16 January 2020 - 12:33 PM, said:

Tony Abbot and Barnaby went there....i’d look at Joeys...

I do love to tease DH who went there (high school only) about this fact. He finds It perplexing that they had the same education as him and came out with the views they did.

For what it is worth he loved his time there, as did his younger brother, but as he puts it, it’s not for everyone.

#25 Moo point

Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:29 PM

View PostGrinchette, on 16 January 2020 - 06:44 PM, said:

Hey Moo Point DS is going into Y2 this year too at our local public too(yet to enrol him), but we’re hoping he’ll transition in term 2.  And yes our local is HHH.

ETA we would have enrolled him (actually both kids in our local public) to begin with, except the Principal at the time was a right royal cow.  Every ASD family we knew that started there ended up leaving within 2 years of starting. Luckily she’s now ‘retired’ and things are looking up. Apparently “...SN’s kids are too much work, so you need to make yourself known now (at the information evening), so we can work out how to deal with them”.

Good luck!

That's awful what your school's former principal said :( Sounds like another local school we visited - the school counsellor looked at DS like he had some contagious disease, and the principal said "I'm not sure we can deal with him, we've never had a child like THAT before." Thank god DS was completely oblivious and immersed in his iPad and didn't hear it! I was furious and felt sick. Our school had an older more traditional (ie exclusionary) principal who retired the year before DS started kindergarten - I imagine we'd have the same issues if she stayed, according to other parents with older kids it impacted the staff as well. The new one is so lovely and welcoming, and lots of parents are very positive about the changes.




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