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Sleep overs


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#1 LucyGoose

Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:10 PM

My DD wants to have a sleep over for her 10th birthday (4-5 guests)

I swore after the last one I’d never again allow a sleepover,  had tears,  and all up late and awake early. I hate them!  I found it really stressful.   I think this is also coupled with the fact I have three kids (4 yr old and 8 yr old).

How do you stop siblings from annoying the other kids?
Do you just leave them be after 8 or 9pm,  or would you hassle them to go to bed?
If they are still awake at 10 or 11,  do you go to bed?  Or wait until they are asleep.
Anyway,  tell me your sleepover success stories so that I can hopefully not deprive my sweet DD.



#2 Byjingoalltheway

Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:15 PM

I go to bed, but clearly say that I’m happy for them to talk, but it is not the time for running/dancing/jumping around. Lucky for us DD’s friends are all really great. I’m happy to set them up in the lounge with a movie and popcorn etc. and know I won’t wake up with the place looking like a bomb has hit :)

Sorry, that probably didn’t help

#3 Manicmum

Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:36 PM

At 10? It was lights out at ten. Siblings are always included here.. but they are close in age. A one person sleepover is treated as per the family and sleep in the friends bedroom.

#4 FearsomeFeralFreak

Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:59 PM

I just let them stay up. It’s one night, it’s a sleepover- it’s normally all about NOT sleeping! As long as they don’t keep the whole house up all night I’m relaxed about it all. The kids love a sleepover so I’m happy to make them happy! They stay in the lounge room, watch movies, eat junk.
Siblings are just told it’s not there party.


#5 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 11 December 2019 - 11:13 PM

Do you have anyone who can have the siblings for the night? That does make it easy. If not, I bribe them. I also find involving them in some way helps, with food prep or cake decoration, just being involved but mostly they are told it’s not their birthday.

I just leave them be, I don’t worry about them sleeping, I just go to bed at my usual time. Sleepovers end at 10am here, so they are out of my hair by the time they are cranky :lol:

Edited by ~Jolly_F~, 11 December 2019 - 11:15 PM.


#6 #notallcats

Posted 11 December 2019 - 11:17 PM

Sleep overs are dinner, movie and then in their room... they can talk/play/whatever but I usually don't interfere with bed time unless it gets crazy.

My condolences, I am not fond of the sleep over!

#7 MsLaurie

Posted 12 December 2019 - 07:13 AM

I run a Girl Guides group and we routinely have sleepovers for 15-25 kids, usually around ages 7-12.
Obviously a bit more regimented than a home party but what seems to help the chaos:
* Silly games time pre-dinner (preferably some outdoors running around but indoor party games like pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey also work)
* something crafty to calm down - even just colouring in a themed placemat helps
* dinner
* a night walk with torches around the local streets at about 9 or 10pm. Let the kids walk in a group a little ahead of the adults so they can gossip and bounce about
* get into pjs, and into sleeping bags. Say they don’t have to go to sleep but it’s time to calm down
* at 11ish tell them it’s time to be quiet

If needed, a grumpy voice “it’s late and time for sleep” at about 11.45. But it’s usually not needed.

Something about the night walk really helps get the wriggles out and is a bit exciting, and helps them feel ready to calm afterwards. You could do a movie between dinner and the night walk.

Good luck! Sleepovers are fun :)

#8 seayork2002

Posted 12 December 2019 - 08:18 AM

View PostMsLaurie, on 12 December 2019 - 07:13 AM, said:

I run a Girl Guides group and we routinely have sleepovers for 15-25 kids, usually around ages 7-12.
Obviously a bit more regimented than a home party but what seems to help the chaos:
* Silly games time pre-dinner (preferably some outdoors running around but indoor party games like pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey also work)
* something crafty to calm down - even just colouring in a themed placemat helps
* dinner
* a night walk with torches around the local streets at about 9 or 10pm. Let the kids walk in a group a little ahead of the adults so they can gossip and bounce about
* get into pjs, and into sleeping bags. Say they don’t have to go to sleep but it’s time to calm down
* at 11ish tell them it’s time to be quiet

If needed, a grumpy voice “it’s late and time for sleep” at about 11.45. But it’s usually not needed.

Something about the night walk really helps get the wriggles out and is a bit exciting, and helps them feel ready to calm afterwards. You could do a movie between dinner and the night walk.

Good luck! Sleepovers are fun Posted Image

I think this is what they do at my sons scouts (well something like this!)

#9 PoolsideMasterchef

Posted 12 December 2019 - 10:40 AM

Havent hit sleepovers yet but with playdates I bring out the baking / craft to distract siblings.  We also have a talk about each person getting their turn to have friends over and its important that everyone respects that - plus lots of praise if they leave the other kids alone when asked.

#10 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 12 December 2019 - 10:56 AM

I would definitely off-load your other 2 if at all possible. And then follow the girl guides process that MsLaurie does.

And finally, just know that you're not going to get enough sleep and plan for some down time the following arvo.

#11 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 12 December 2019 - 11:54 AM

A friend's suggestion that I tried a couple of times, sit in the room with them reading a book by torchlight, well these days I'd be on my kindle.
I only did this if they were still up at 2am and with 10 and under.
It worked for a couple of hours.

#12 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 12 December 2019 - 01:26 PM

How do you stop siblings from annoying the other kids?
(a) allow sibling to invite 1 of their own friends
OR
(b) allow sibling to do something special by themselves or only with Mummy/Daddy that night (one time DD2 and Daddy watched a show together on the ipad in our room while sleepover movie was happening in the lounge room)
Upon saying that, usually the sibling is included, but we don't force it.

Do you just leave them be after 8 or 9pm,  or would you hassle them to go to bed?
Once dinner is done and dusted and all teeth have been cleaned, I generally leave them to it. I will interrupt if they are getting too noisy though and tell them to quieten down.

In our house with sleepovers, it's lights out and no talking after midnight for my oldest DD1 (who is 12). The deadline is 11pm for my youngest (who is 10yo, nearly 11). I give them a warning at 30 minutes before the deadline to let them know it's going to bedtime soon. Sometimes they will decide to go to bed themselves before that time, which is nice. I will stand at the door to shut them up if I keep hearing noise after the deadline, they have seen this in action, LOL!

If they are still awake at 10 or 11,  do you go to bed?  Or wait until they are asleep.
I wait until they are asleep. But I am the night owl. No way could DH do that! He's normally out like a light himself  between 9-10pm!

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 12 December 2019 - 01:28 PM.


#13 Falala-llyjonk

Posted 13 December 2019 - 12:22 AM

Ugh, can't stand sleepovers - hosting or sending my kids to them.

Last time my eight year old came home weeping from sheer tiredness and frustration because two of the girls went silly until 4am and kept following the other two who wanted to escape and sleep. The parents did not do anything to intervene which really annoyed me. She's decided she doesn't much like sleepovers either.

As for how to keep siblings from annoying. I find that sending them to someone else's house is most effective. But short of that, offering a movie night on the laptop on our bed usually works.

#14 JustBeige

Posted 13 December 2019 - 04:43 AM

The most effective trick I found for making the sleep over about sleep is having it after school on a Friday.  They are tired after a week at school and generally pass out.

I also switch out the snack table. I take away the 'old' lollies and soft drink and replace with popcorn, crackers, water and a weak cordial mix.

Sibs, when younger I arranged for them to have their own sleepover at nans.   As they got older they just bailed to a friends place.

#15 gracie1978

Posted 13 December 2019 - 11:56 AM

As a girl I loved sleepovers so much.

I know they're awful for parents, but if you can make it work I'm sure your children will appreciate it.




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