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Snarky comments about people who dress stylishly


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#1 LadyGreyTea

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:22 PM

I have friend I catch up with every now and then who feels the need to make snarky comments about people who dress up nicely when in public.
She will say things like "why do they bother?? Who are they trying to impress?"
Sometimes she'll b***h about Asians wearing designer labels in Melbourne's CBD and accuse them of being brand obsessed.
She made comments about a mutual classmate who was always immaculately dressed, saying "why bother dressing up for TAFE?"
I'm a fairly casual dresser myself but if I'm ever dressed remotely stylishly to go meet her at a cafe, she'll ask "why are you all dressed up?".
My friend herself wears trackies and hoodies at home and in public, and since no one cares what she wears, why does she need to tear down others who like to dress stylishly?

Edited by LadyGreyTea, 06 December 2019 - 05:27 PM.


#2 ImperatorFuriosa

Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:34 PM


"why does she need to tear down others who like to dress stylishly?"


Because she's a b**ch?


    #3 red_squirrel

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 04:37 PM

    My immediate response would be to think she is insecure but in this case it sounds more like she is lazy, knows it, doesn’t want to be and puts others down in order to feel better herself.

    I can’t remember where I read it but the European idea on dressing is, “one should always dress to the best of ones abilities out of respect for everyone else who has to look at you”.

    #4 Oriental lily

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:03 PM

    Honestly I pay close to no attention at all to what people wear unless it’s something I like that I might compliment them on .
    I certainly don’t know ‘brands’ .

    She just sounds judgemental due to her own insecurities.

    #5 Froyohoho

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:37 PM

    Completely her own issues.

    #6 kimasa

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:39 PM

    We live in a very misogynistic world and we are taught to be openly critical of other women's appearances from a very young age.

    I certainly know that's what I was taught and despite years and years of training myself otherwise I still occasionally think things that make me go "What the hell Kimasa, that's so unnecessary and entirely made up by you".

    #7 Froyohoho

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:40 PM

    The racist comments are completely revolting too.

    #8 seayork2002

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:42 PM

    Can't say I agree with nor do it my self but people comment on all sorts, as we do on here

    #9 Chee72

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:53 PM

    Your friend is jealous and a b**ch

    #10 BadCat

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 05:55 PM

    It's not really any different to people who comment on people who wear trackies or uggs in public.  Plenty of people on here do that.

    People need to stop judging others on appearance, full stop.

    #11 Jane Jinglebells

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:12 PM

    Every now and again this crops up on EB.

    Some people like to tell us that they like to laugh at people in dresses and heels and makeup, and they snot about how much cleverer they are than women who like these things.

    Meanwhile some people like to tell us that they sneer at people who have "let themselves go" and start equating failure to do hair and makeup with failing to do any self care whatsoever.

    Regardless of the position taken, the common ground is judgemental d***headery. OP, your friend sounds like a judgey d***head. Only you know whether you feel it's worthwhile staying friends with a judgey d***head, or at least saying something about it.

    Well, way to take all the nuance out of that one, automated Channel Nine Nice Ladies Don't Swear Filter.

    Edited by Jane Jetson, 06 December 2019 - 06:14 PM.


    #12 UndergroundKelpie

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:15 PM

    My response would be "It makes them happy. If everyone was the same, you wouldn't be an individual and I love your uniquness"

    #13 seayork2002

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:19 PM

    Thinking about it more isn't it insulting/rude (however to put it) in itself  - who determines what is stylish or not?

    #14 Hollycoddle

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:56 PM

    View Postred_squirrel, on 06 December 2019 - 04:37 PM, said:


    I can’t remember where I read it but the European idea on dressing is, “one should always dress to the best of ones abilities out of respect for everyone else who has to look at you”.

    I don't know that I'd go that far! I don't think society demands anything more than being clean, tidy and paying attention to personal hygiene. You don't need to wear makeup, have a fashionable hairstyle or expensive clothes. If it's a clean tracksuit with no holes or tears then that's fine by me!

    Of course, you do dress to the occasion but for general everyday activity, for me the above applies ^^

    Edited by Mollycoddle, 06 December 2019 - 06:59 PM.


    #15 night jasmine

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:58 PM

    She’s being judgmental.

    I quite enjoy dressing up, I don’t know how or why it would affect anyone else.

    #16 Lifesgood

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 06:59 PM

    Its just another form of judgementalism, stemming from insecurity.

    I love looking at other beautifully dressed women.

    That doesn't really sound the way I mean it. I mean I love observing how beautifully dressed they are.

    #17 ~Jolly_F~

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:00 PM

    View PostBadCat, on 06 December 2019 - 05:55 PM, said:

    It's not really any different to people who comment on people who wear trackies or uggs in public.  Plenty of people on here do that.

    People need to stop judging others on appearance, full stop.

    Yes they do - that’s the answer to both statements.

    I find it interesting that had this thread had been about uggs, trackies or god forbid activewear the answers would have been very very different....

    I like to people watch, people are fascinating, so I notice stuff but you don’t need to be a d*ck about it like your friend is!

    Edited by ~J_F~, 06 December 2019 - 07:03 PM.


    #18 Lifesgood

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:02 PM

    View Postred_squirrel, on 06 December 2019 - 04:37 PM, said:

    I can’t remember where I read it but the European idea on dressing is, “one should always dress to the best of ones abilities out of respect for everyone else who has to look at you”.

    In a similar vein, I recall reading advice that was along the lines of 'always wear your best clothes, every day, don't save them for special occasions. If they make you feel great wear them as often as possible'.

    I love when I'm in Italy (have been a fair bit as I am from an Italian family) and I see how beautifully dressed everyone is - men and women. They make such an effort and yet appear effortless.

    #19 Jingleflea

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:04 PM

    I was taught if you leave the house you make an effort in what you wear and how you look because it shows you respect yourself and have respect for others.

    I do have a European mother so maybe it's cultural?

    #20 ~Jolly_F~

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:07 PM

    View PostJenflea, on 06 December 2019 - 07:04 PM, said:

    I was taught if you leave the house you make an effort in what you wear and how you look because it shows you respect yourself and have respect for others.


    See that’s just plain odd to me.

    What does my clothing have to do with how I respect myself or others?

    Do you really believe that?  

    So you see me in my thongs, muscle tee and workout leggings and think she has no respect for herself or me?

    Really?

    Edited by ~J_F~, 06 December 2019 - 07:08 PM.


    #21 night jasmine

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:08 PM

    .

    Edited by night jasmine, 07 December 2019 - 08:53 AM.


    #22 LadyGreyTea

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:11 PM

    Hi everyone thanks for responding

    To put it in context my friend is in her very early 20s and I notice alot of young women her age wear the standard jumper or hoodie and a pair of leggings or yoga pants with runners.
    I myself am 30 and tend to wear fitted jeans and a knitted jumper or a nice dress or cute top and skirt ensemble depending on the weather.
    I'm not at all fashion conscious, but im often complimented how I my manage to pull off quirky/fun patterns and bright colours.

    I wondered if her comments were out of immaturity or ignorance or just plain jealousy.
    Her mother is sometimes dismayed that she wears trackies to the city and is often told she looks like she's in her pyjamas. (They are of Italian background)
    I was not a decent dresser till I hit my mid 20s as it took me a very long time to figure out my own style, and what looked good on me. Unlike my friend however I would never even think to judge others or begrudge others for dressing up.

    Edited by LadyGreyTea, 06 December 2019 - 07:28 PM.


    #23 night jasmine

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:15 PM

    Well you know your friend. The judgment could stem from any number of issues.

    #24 DirtyStreetPie

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:16 PM

    OP, your friend seems embittered because she's not entirely satisfied by her own clothing choices.

    There is nothing wrong with trackies, and if that's what your friend is comfortable wearing, then she should own it and enjoy how cozy she is all the time!

    As for me, trackies are my uniform. I have "going out" trackies for the shops, and "staying home" trackies. I wear runners almost daily. And for work (I'm a teacher), I wear my "good" jeans (lol) with boots that are too scuffed at the toe. :p

    But then, when an occasion calls for it, I put on the war paint and a nice dress/skirt.

    #25 Oriental lily

    Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:19 PM

    Well it sounds like she is receiving judgment from her own mum so .projecting the same judgement on others .

    She is probably just a bit immature .




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