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Emergency kit/pantry list in case of no power/water


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#1 purpleduck

Posted Yesterday, 01:43 PM

With all the stuff about the bushfires and the extreme weather due tomorrow, I've been thinking about what we would need to have on hand in case we lost power/water. We are in Sydney metro area but obviously have had short water/power outages now and then.

We take these services so much for granted, but with some local schools being closed tomorrow, its just brought it to my attention that we should have minimal supplies for 3 days.

I found these old EB links:
http://www.essential...e-days-of-food/
http://www.essential...mergency-ready/
http://www.essential...52755-prepping/

and then have found a couple of others online (only looking at Australian pages):

https://www.livingst...nter/View/10187
http://www.agricultu.../pantrylist.pdf

We've been meaning to get a small camp stove etc but never got around to it, and we do have a few litres of bottled water in the pantry, but really, other than heaps of apples, some snacky things, everything else would require water and heat to cook it.

Does anyone have any tips on things they have as part of an emergency kit (thinking mainly food here, but other areas welcome) and any meal ideas?

Thank you

#2 ~J_F~

Posted Yesterday, 01:48 PM

A battery operated radio is handy.

Our car is fully decked out with a fridge and travel buddy oven plus butane cooker and cooking stuff.

We also have a cyclone kit, that we can grab and go.

We keep all our important documents (passports, birth certificates, copies of drivers licences, insurance paperwork and so on) in a large ziplock, so we can grab it with the cyclone kit.

We have rice, pasta, sauces for those. 2 minute noodles, tinned spaghetti and beans. Continental rice and pasts packs. Long life milk. All in a box.  

We have a stocked first aid kit in the car.

#3 seayork2002

Posted Yesterday, 01:52 PM

I am just making sure we have bread and some colds things in the fridge, the fridge is ok for a a day or so if not opened that much and maybe some tin fruit, I can't imagine the power will be of more than a day if it even does.

Plus the shops will still be around

we have normal household first aid things in the place but can't see they would be needed more if the electricity is out

#4 can'tstayaway

Posted Yesterday, 01:54 PM

We have a generator so could keep basic appliances going - freezer, lights, gas stove etc.  we don’t keep a supply of diesel on hand so would need to get some which doesn’t help with prolonged unexpected outages.

We camp camp stoves etc (which reminds me, I haven’t replaced the fuel from our last trip).  I have some bottled water but not enough to survive if we’re completed cut off. I don’t have much in the way of dry or tinned foods either.  Enough to survive a few days but not more.

It was different living rurally where I was much better stocked and had a productive garden too. These days I’m 5mins drive away from 3 Coles, 2 Woolies, 2 IGAs and an Aldi. In some ways it has made be complacent but my home is also smaller so we have less storage for ‘prepping’

#5 Ozquoll

Posted Yesterday, 01:58 PM

Water is the most important thing. At least 2L per person, per day just for drinking, plus extra for cooking and (minimal) handwashing. DH brews beer so we just fill the carboys with water when he's not brewing beer in them, plus a couple of 10 litre Jerry cans. If I owned rather than rented, I'd install rain water tanks.

Most of us are carrying around plenty of calories in our fat cells to last us months without eating ;-). And most people I know have got enough food in their kitchen to get through a three day interruption to food supply without going hungry. For cooking, one of these butane powered burners from the camping store is cheap and works well.

https://www.anaconda...DSABEgLu8PD_BwE


#6 can'tstayaway

Posted Yesterday, 02:04 PM

Thinking more about this...in the four years we’ve been here, we haven’t had a single power or water outage. In the 9 odd years we were rural, we had power outages nearly weekly in summer and occasionally in winter. We were on tank water and only ran dry once (not long after moving in).

Bushfires are not likely where we are now. A house fire jumping across is more likely and my only concern would be to get out of the house.

During the 2011 floods, our house wasn’t affected. Food shortages due to delivery problems would be an inconvenience but there was plenty of notice and the ability to stock up.

Zombie apocalypse and I’m likely to load us into the car and head for the hills.

#7 Thylacine

Posted Yesterday, 03:07 PM

Most importantly, don't let the fuel in your car drop too low so you can evacuate if necessary

#8 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted Yesterday, 03:17 PM

We don’t have any waiter on hand. Not even a tank! That’s our biggest risk. When the power company does maintenance I just fill half a dozen jugs and half a bathtub.

I really should buy some sort of water container and keep it filled for emergencies.

We have lots of dry goods though, and a bit of long life milk. We could survive a week, maybe two but the second week would be lentils, tinned soup. We have a gas and charcoal BBQ, gas stove top, wood fireplace, food would get cooked.

#9 purpleduck

Posted Yesterday, 03:19 PM

Lemonmyrtle - I think you can buy 10-15L water containers at Coles/Woolies etc

eg. https://shop.coles.c...-spring-natural

#10 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted Yesterday, 03:21 PM

As far as preparing for emergencies goes through, storage is an issue. As in space to store stuff. In high density residential areas no one has space to store 2 weeks worth of food. A few days, yeah, but 2 weeks worth of long life food for a family is a lot of food, and even more water, We may have room for all that, just. But people in units and apartments would have even less room.

#11 ~J_F~

Posted Yesterday, 03:23 PM

We have a 100L water tank in our car that we fill and a few 20L drums.

If you know water is going to be an issue, you can fill your bathtub.

#12 Paddlepop

Posted Yesterday, 03:41 PM

LM: We have two of these Willow 25L water containers. They actually fit 30L if you fill them right to the top past the fill line. They have a tap that fits at the bottom for easy use. Very sturdy. I'm sure we didn't pay this much for them because Big W used to have them but don't have this size listed online.
https://www.superche...lue/271517.html

If the power goes off you can help keep a fridge or freezer cooler for longer if you wrap it up in blankets. Sounds silly but the blankets help to insulate it and keep the cold in. Even better if you have woollen blankets. It kept our small bar fridge-sized freezer frozen for 72 hours when we lost power in the 2011 Brisbane flood. Unfortunately our power was off for 92 hours so we lost the lot, but Centrelink provided a payment for replacement of lost food based on the number of people in the household as long as the power had been off for a minimum number of hours. Can't remember how many. Might have been 72 hours. I have no idea if the payment still exists.

#13 PrincessPeach

Posted Yesterday, 04:53 PM

Havent thought about the food situation (we are on the same power grid as the police & ambulance station, so priority repair area) but with 2 asthmatics in the house, keeping enough medication on hand is ultra critical.

Ventolin/Asmol can be in very short supply during fires as people who are not normally affected suddenly need it.

#14 littlepickle

Posted Yesterday, 05:40 PM

My parents have a holiday house in a very high risk fire area. They laughed when I put together 2 adult evac packs and a pet pack - 24 hours worth of supplies etc...

I was reading something the other day that says that most households are 6 meals away from beginning to starve ( in the event of a catastrophic event). In reality you should stock a week of water, the means to sterilise water and food for a week...

#15 Bethlehem Babe

Posted Yesterday, 06:52 PM

https://www.facebook...618?d=n&sfns=mo

And

https://www.facebook...916?d=n&sfns=mo

And

https://www.breastfe...gRcxCim5XuEgia4

Are really great lists if you have babies.

Edited by Bethlehem Babe, Yesterday, 06:53 PM.


#16 Mose

Posted Yesterday, 07:24 PM

View Postlittlepickle, on 11 November 2019 - 05:40 PM, said:

My parents have a holiday house in a very high risk fire area. They laughed when I put together 2 adult evac packs and a pet pack - 24 hours worth of supplies etc...

I was reading something the other day that says that most households are 6 meals away from beginning to starve ( in the event of a catastrophic event). In reality you should stock a week of water, the means to sterilise water and food for a week...

How frequently does the water need replacing?  That's what always puts me off storing any?  I mean if you buy it bottled it should last a good long time, but what if you fill one of the previously mentioned containers yourself?  How long would it continue to be safe for drinking?  

Does anyone know?

#17 purpleduck

Posted Yesterday, 07:40 PM

When we think about having emergency water or other dry goods, we would assume there would be a natural use and refresh of items as they got close to a use by date.

Of course this requires semi regular checks and actual action if ;) perhaps it would be more successful and less wasteful to link this check with daylight savings or school holidays etc :D

#18 Mose

Posted Yesterday, 07:50 PM

View Postpurpleduck, on 11 November 2019 - 07:40 PM, said:

When we think about having emergency water or other dry goods, we would assume there would be a natural use and refresh of items as they got close to a use by date.

Of course this requires semi regular checks and actual action if ;) perhaps it would be more successful and less wasteful to link this check with daylight savings or school holidays etc :D

I am good with that on dry goods etc, but wouldn't normally buy or use bottled water. If self-stored tap water doesn't last long, then being well prepped would require semi regular bottled water purchases.

Good idea to link the check with daylight savings.

#19 ~J_F~

Posted Yesterday, 07:54 PM

View PostMose, on 11 November 2019 - 07:50 PM, said:



I am good with that on dry goods etc, but wouldn't normally buy or use bottled water. If self-stored tap water doesn't last long, then being well prepped would require semi regular bottled water purchases.

Good idea to link the check with daylight savings.

You can just have the 20L containers ready to fill when you know you need to prep, most of the time you have some notice or fill your bath if you plan to stay at home.

You can get tablets to add to water to make it drinkable.

#20 Acidulous Osprey

Posted Yesterday, 07:55 PM

View Postseayork2002, on 11 November 2019 - 01:52 PM, said:

I am just making sure we have bread and some colds things in the fridge, the fridge is ok for a a day or so if not opened that much and maybe some tin fruit, I can't imagine the power will be of more than a day if it even does.

Plus the shops will still be around

we have normal household first aid things in the place but can't see they would be needed more if the electricity is out

Ths shops are not necessarily going to be open or stocked though.

We have stored water, enough food for a couple of weeks and I am rigorous about making sure we have DS2's elemental formula well stocked.

#21 Nasty Poobah

Posted Yesterday, 08:05 PM

You can buy 15 litre containers of water and they've generally got a fairly good shelf life. They're not designed to be reusable but they will give you safe drinking water. You can always reserve the out of date ones for washing, or boil them. We're on tank water and we have a couple in reserve in case there's a long power outage as we have a pump. I don't buy bottled water either generally but I do think having access to safe drinking water is pretty crucial.

#22 Fluffy Potatoes

Posted Yesterday, 08:19 PM

Following, it’s our first year in the tropics and I’ve been working on our cyclone kit over the last few weeks. The general advice I have seen is to prepare for 3 days without water/power.

So far I have about 50ltrs of water, a battery operated radio and have been buying a few cans of food randomly asi see them on special.

I figure we have the bbq and the camp stove to cook on. I don’t keep much more than a weeks worth of meat in the freezer, the fridge will probably stay coldish for 2 days so will need to eat it out pretty quick. Plan on filling tub and all sinks with water for cleaning/flushing toilet. Would also like to get a large water storage drum(?) for the same reason.
Might need to buy masking tape for windows? And will definitely need batteries, candles, extra nappies and maybe a few baby food pouches.

#23 ~J_F~

Posted Yesterday, 08:22 PM

View PostFluffy Potatoes, on 11 November 2019 - 08:19 PM, said:

Following, it’s our first year in the tropics and I’ve been working on our cyclone kit over the last few weeks. The general advice I have seen is to prepare for 3 days without water/power.

So far I have about 50ltrs of water, a battery operated radio and have been buying a few cans of food randomly asi see them on special.

I figure we have the bbq and the camp stove to cook on. I don’t keep much more than a weeks worth of meat in the freezer, the fridge will probably stay coldish for 2 days so will need to eat it out pretty quick. Plan on filling tub and all sinks with water for cleaning/flushing toilet. Would also like to get a large water storage drum(?) for the same reason.
Might need to buy masking tape for windows? And will definitely need batteries, candles, extra nappies and maybe a few baby food pouches.

Old house or new house? Old house you will need masking tape, newer houses have coated cyclone glass that might break but won’t put shards everywhere.

Also make sure that your important paperwork is protected and together, so you can grab it if you need to leave.

#24 Expelliarmus

Posted Yesterday, 08:26 PM

Google 72 hour kits - they have a lot of variations out there.

#25 WaitForMe

Posted Yesterday, 08:37 PM

Bottled water doesn't actually go off, its perfectly fine drinking it past the use by date:
https://www.livescie...ion-dates-.html




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