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Keeping baby cool in summer


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#26 Pearson

Posted 02 November 2019 - 03:04 PM

I had a heat rash baby in Brisbane summer.
Wet washers thrown in the freezer helped, we took them everywhere. Baths with some bicarb. Less clothes. Singlet and nappy at home, add nappy cover or training pants when you go out.
I am a big fan of singlets. They wick the sweat from your body, making it cooler.
Honestly, no matter what you do, baby could just be susceptible to heat rash. My heat rash baby got sent home in grade 1 from an airconditioned classroom with "measles". He had a freaking heat rash, no other symptoms, and only around his neck. The teacher got a quick lesson in over reacting.

#27 Babetty

Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:39 PM

View PostPearson, on 02 November 2019 - 03:04 PM, said:

Wet washers thrown in the freezer helped, we took them everywhere. Baths with some bicarb. Less clothes. Singlet and nappy at home, add nappy cover or training pants when you go out.


I'd forgotten this! We used to keep a stash of wet washers in a plastic bag in the freezer. Just rubbing the back of Bub's neck with it made a huge difference.

#28 Jingleflea

Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:47 PM

They're also good for a teething baby to gum on.

#29 Starflash

Posted 02 November 2019 - 07:06 PM

Have you ever tried the old-fashioned evaporative air conditioner? Aka wet towel by the fan :p

#30 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 02 November 2019 - 07:15 PM

I get why you're looking to appease the mother but it's ridiculous of her to threaten that you can't have the baby if you don't have Aircon 🙄. Definitely look at ways to keep him cool but I think she's being OTT.

#31 Lunafreya

Posted 02 November 2019 - 07:24 PM

We kept DS cool for ages without an air con doing everything I suggested. You don’t need an air con, they certainly do help though.

#32 lizzybirdsworth

Posted 02 November 2019 - 07:41 PM

Singlet, nappy, change to cooler wraps (my ds3 wanted to be wrapped until 8-9 months through summer) try a thin sleeping bag instead if he likes it. Lots of fluid in small doses. Can be a wet flannel, sippy  cup of water, ice cube in a mesh bag feeder. Some kids are just prone to heat rashes and if it’s around the chin/neck area could possibly be dribble rash.
Also check your lease agreement to see if you are allowed to bring in a portable aircon seeing as you are a share house it may not be allowed

#33 CoffeeGuy

Posted 02 November 2019 - 08:25 PM

View PostI, on 02 November 2019 - 07:15 PM, said:

I get why you're looking to appease the mother but it's ridiculous of her to threaten that you can't have the baby if you don't have Aircon 🙄. Definitely look at ways to keep him cool but I think she's being OTT.

Well heat rash is a problem and if I can't keep baby cool enough that becomes her problem as she has to deal with the rash during the week.  She does have a point but I think air con is a bit much.

Mother has the final word when it comes to children so better to comply.

View PostStarflash, on 02 November 2019 - 07:06 PM, said:

Have you ever tried the old-fashioned evaporative air conditioner? Aka wet towel by the fan Posted Image

Wow that works?  I'll give that a try tomorrow and see if I notice a difference.

View Postlizzybirdsworth, on 02 November 2019 - 07:41 PM, said:

Singlet, nappy, change to cooler wraps (my ds3 wanted to be wrapped until 8-9 months through summer) try a thin sleeping bag instead if he likes it. Lots of fluid in small doses. Can be a wet flannel, sippy  cup of water, ice cube in a mesh bag feeder. Some kids are just prone to heat rashes and if it’s around the chin/neck area could possibly be dribble rash.
Also check your lease agreement to see if you are allowed to bring in a portable aircon seeing as you are a share house it may not be allowed

Only appliance banned is fan heater probably because it is a fire risk and it cooks the electricity bill.  Considering the coin operated air con, clothes washer and drier I reckon it is rocking the boat to have portable air con roasting the electricity bill.

#34 Lunafreya

Posted 02 November 2019 - 08:28 PM

I have found pine tarsal baths that are not too warm or cool dealt with heat rash very well.

#35 born.a.girl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 07:32 AM

You might find this ABC article useful:
https://www.abc.net....summer/11634332



One of the things I found useful in looking after a baby, is wondering what people would have done a generation or three ago.

My mother had six, 18 months apart, in a brick veneer without insulation (wasn't a thing then), and the only fans were ones small children could stick their fingers into. We lived somewhere with roasting hot summers, that didn't cool down overnight much.

I was in a weatherboard with higher ceilings, so not as bad, and just did the things she did - facewasher plus some moving air if you can.

The mother doesn't actually have the final say - she has a significant say given whatever happens at your house has implications for her, but that doesn't give her the right to dictate unreasonable requests of you, when it's your time with the baby.

One of the problems with constant air conditioning, which may be what she's used to, is that it makes the contrast with the actual temperature much more difficult to deal with.

The orientation of your room might be making a difference too.  I once lived in a weatherboard part of a house that faced west, and during heatwaves, had no escape from it.    If you get hot sun shining on the window, getting a piece of shadecloth and fixing that over the window outside will make a huge difference, if there's no sun protection on it.

#36 I'mBeachedAs

Posted 03 November 2019 - 07:56 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 03 November 2019 - 07:32 AM, said:

You might find this ABC article useful:
https://www.abc.net....summer/11634332



One of the things I found useful in looking after a baby, is wondering what people would have done a generation or three ago.

My mother had six, 18 months apart, in a brick veneer without insulation (wasn't a thing then), and the only fans were ones small children could stick their fingers into. We lived somewhere with roasting hot summers, that didn't cool down overnight much.

I was in a weatherboard with higher ceilings, so not as bad, and just did the things she did - facewasher plus some moving air if you can.

The mother doesn't actually have the final say - she has a significant say given whatever happens at your house has implications for her, but that doesn't give her the right to dictate unreasonable requests of you, when it's your time with the baby.

One of the problems with constant air conditioning, which may be what she's used to, is that it makes the contrast with the actual temperature much more difficult to deal with.

The orientation of your room might be making a difference too.  I once lived in a weatherboard part of a house that faced west, and during heatwaves, had no escape from it.    If you get hot sun shining on the window, getting a piece of shadecloth and fixing that over the window outside will make a huge difference, if there's no sun protection on it.

Agree entirely with this and is said much more eloquently than my attempt. As a society we have become so used to constant air con that people find it hard to cope without it now. Admittedly summers are getting hotter though 🤷. My kids are 6 and 3 and they were both babies in Brisbane in summer with no air con. I just used common sense and kept them dressed lightly, used fans, wet washers etc and they were mostly fine with minimal heat rash that I can recall.

#37 IamOzgirl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 09:13 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 03 November 2019 - 07:32 AM, said:

You might find this ABC article useful:
https://www.abc.net....summer/11634332



One of the things I found useful in looking after a baby, is wondering what people would have done a generation or three ago.

My mother had six, 18 months apart, in a brick veneer without insulation (wasn't a thing then), and the only fans were ones small children could stick their fingers into. We lived somewhere with roasting hot summers, that didn't cool down overnight much.

I was in a weatherboard with higher ceilings, so not as bad, and just did the things she did - facewasher plus some moving air if you can.

The mother doesn't actually have the final say - she has a significant say given whatever happens at your house has implications for her, but that doesn't give her the right to dictate unreasonable requests of you, when it's your time with the baby.

One of the problems with constant air conditioning, which may be what she's used to, is that it makes the contrast with the actual temperature much more difficult to deal with.

The orientation of your room might be making a difference too.  I once lived in a weatherboard part of a house that faced west, and during heatwaves, had no escape from it.    If you get hot sun shining on the window, getting a piece of shadecloth and fixing that over the window outside will make a huge difference, if there's no sun protection on it.

Unfortunately unless court orders are in place she can refuse to give up baby.

It is also very unheard for court to grant overnights prior to 2yrs of age. If mother is against it.

Suspect OP won't be going doing the court order path anyway. But still is worth considering.

But OP is right in that he can buy the portable A/C unit and not use it.

#38 born.a.girl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 11:45 AM

View PostIamOzgirl, on 03 November 2019 - 09:13 AM, said:

Unfortunately unless court orders are in place she can refuse to give up baby.

It is also very unheard for court to grant overnights prior to 2yrs of age. If mother is against it.

Suspect OP won't be going doing the court order path anyway. But still is worth considering.

But OP is right in that he can buy the portable A/C unit and not use it.


Of course she can unreasonably refuse to hand the baby to him, but again, that would be unreasonable.

I can't imagine any court allowing that sort of requirement to be put into court orders if they existed under the circumstances (where they are not permitted at his residence).

#39 IamOzgirl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 11:58 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 03 November 2019 - 11:45 AM, said:




Of course she can unreasonably refuse to hand the baby to him, but again, that would be unreasonable.

I can't imagine any court allowing that sort of requirement to be put into court orders if they existed under the circumstances (where they are not permitted at his residence).

I don't understand your second para.

But unfortunately it is not considered reasonable for a father to expect overnight stays under 2yrs of age.

#40 born.a.girl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 12:03 PM

View PostIamOzgirl, on 03 November 2019 - 11:58 AM, said:

I don't understand your second para.

But unfortunately it is not considered reasonable for a father to expect overnight stays under 2yrs of age.


The mother has specified he must have air conditioning.  If she wanted that condition built into parenting orders, I'd be very surprised if any court allowed that to be added, given where he lives. What could/should be included if necessary is making sure the baby is kept cool enough - doing it the way people did for millennia.

Not sure if you've seen all the threads - the mother has flagged, more than once, her desire to leave the baby with him full time when the baby's about a year old, and move interstate.

In those circumstances, I suspect it would be considered very reasonable for the father to spend some periods of time with the child, and not just during the day, rather than a 12 month old suddenly thrust into a completely alien environment.

How that all pans out remains to be seen, but she's been consistent with her wishes.

Edited by born.a.girl, 03 November 2019 - 12:04 PM.


#41 IamOzgirl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 12:09 PM

Right I get you now.

I wasn't saying get air con built into parenting orders.

I was saying that with no parenting orders in place she can make up any excuse, or not even an excuse can just say no, not this week.

Mother isn't being consistent, yes she says she wants to give baby up to him full time. But then is saying "no, not unless you have air con"

So she is not consistent. The only way OP will have consistentency is parenting orders. And I suspect he won't do that.

So to see his baby right now he needs to go by her rules, and so buying an A/C and not using it is a good plan.

#42 born.a.girl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 12:27 PM

View PostIamOzgirl, on 03 November 2019 - 12:09 PM, said:

Right I get you now.

I wasn't saying get air con built into parenting orders.

I was saying that with no parenting orders in place she can make up any excuse, or not even an excuse can just say no, not this week.

Mother isn't being consistent, yes she says she wants to give baby up to him full time. But then is saying "no, not unless you have air con"

So she is not consistent. The only way OP will have consistentency is parenting orders. And I suspect he won't do that.

So to see his baby right now he needs to go by her rules, and so buying an A/C and not using it is a good plan.


I agree, but what a waste of money.


No, I know you weren't saying 'get it built in', I was simply saying if they DID get parenting orders she'd have buckleys of having it built it, and I consider it unreasonable whether they do or don't.

Maybe he should, given her vacillations (which may be due to the stress that's she under).

#43 gracie1978

Posted 03 November 2019 - 12:35 PM

This thread has had so many good suggestions
We have two broken ceiling fans, getting them replaced with new DC ceiling fans, hopefully that will keep us all cool enough at night.

#44 born.a.girl

Posted 03 November 2019 - 05:31 PM

View Postgracie1978, on 03 November 2019 - 12:35 PM, said:

This thread has had so many good suggestions
We have two broken ceiling fans, getting them replaced with new DC ceiling fans, hopefully that will keep us all cool enough at night.


Our bedroom ceiling fan is just extraordinary.

On the advice of Choice we got a six speed one as our bedroom's not huge, and the lowest speed on the three speed ones can be too high.

We pretty much leave it on the lowest speed all of summer - the speed is such that it just feels like you're outdoors on a pleasant day - difficult to even pick up air movement, but it's there.

With a sweaty husband I like the way it keeps the air fresher, too.

#45 Soontobegran

Posted 05 November 2019 - 08:07 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 03 November 2019 - 11:45 AM, said:

I can't imagine any court allowing that sort of requirement to be put into court orders if they existed under the circumstances (where they are not permitted at his residence).

Courts can do strange things when babies are involved.

efc

Edited by Soontobegran, 05 November 2019 - 08:08 PM.





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