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Pugs - information please


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#1 But seriously

Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:49 PM

We are looking at getting a dog, a pug. We already have two cats - we have a smallish backyard, two kids - a daughter who is 12 who is very very keen on the idea.

I work as does DH.

Anyone got a pug? Any thoughts on what sort of family scenario would suit one?

#2 esme weatherwax

Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:04 PM

I've never had one but have a good friends who had a couple and absolutely loves them. But she will only get pug cross rescues in the future because of the insane amount of health issues they have. Google health issues with brachycephalic breeds.

#3 AdelTwins

Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:14 PM

Beautiful dogs with families. Everyone I know with one, just has the one dog though. Attempts at adding another pug have gone quite poorly.

They do have a lot of health issues relating to their squashed face. Eye issues, breathing issues, etc.

Edited by AdelTwins, 14 October 2019 - 06:53 PM.


#4 tenar

Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:36 PM

I wouldn't get a breed with such a predictable built-in health problem.

Have you considered other low-exercise small dogs, something like a whippet maybe?

Any and all dogs will require as a bare minimum 30 minutes of walking every day for its entire life.  Puppies of most breeds will require more and obviously more active breeds need more than that.  As a young adult my miniature schnauzer needed an hour or more each day, though that reduced as she aged.

So even for a pug, even for a whippet, someone needs the time to walk it for at least 30 minutes every day.  A yard to run in, however large, (most dogs won't do much running on their own anyway) is not a substitute for daily walks.

#5 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 13 October 2019 - 02:46 PM

We have a pug. Overall, he is awesome. Friendly, happy, and once he was about 3 years old
He became very laid back. The puppy years werent too bad, as long as he had attention and lots of toys to chew.

Good points:
Loving, friendly, great with kids, never shown aggression. Best personality in a dog ever.
Doesn’t bark much (one of my top priorities when selecting a breed was low barking habits, no such thing as a dog that never barks though)
Doesn’t need much exercise (but you still have to walk them or play with them to keep them healthy)
Doesn’t eat much
Super cute
And seriously, just so loving.

Bad points:
The hair!! They shed a LOT. It goes EVERYWHERE. Hard floors and leather furniture is a must. And get a Dyson stick vac.
The hair part 2. You have to brush them regularly.
The face. The face needs care. Wrinkles need to be kept clean, eyes are prone to damage. Ours is prone to a dry nose and build up. We are lucky, our pug doesn’t have a super squished face and barely had a nose wrinkle, so we don’t need to wash his face all the time.
Vet attitudes. Some vets are like “here we go, another pug, bet he is fat and can’t breathe and is crazy” but our pug isn’t any of those things
Health. As pugs get older their ability to breathe well deteriorates, and many need surgery. Especially if they are fat. There are also some diseases in the breed. Just keep a big budget handy for vet visits and buy from a good breeder.  Again, we have been lucky, 6 years and no major health issues. And we have a relative that is a vet and gives free vet care.
Not easily trained, but very food motivated, will do any trick for a treat, but not to be trusted off lead.

As for not being home much - not ideal, but our pug was fine with it. We left lots of toys and things. These days he is rarely home alone though, so not sure how he would go if we left him at home again.

Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 13 October 2019 - 02:49 PM.


#6 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:02 PM

Here he is doing what he does most the day. Dozing on the deck.

Attached Files


Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 13 October 2019 - 03:43 PM.


#7 *Spikey*

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:16 PM

Check out Pug rescue on FB.

Lemon Myrtle summarises the pros and cons well, although I never found them difficult to train. They do well with crates - which is awesome for travelling with.

Only major problem I've seen (apart from the ones LM mentioned) was with cross bred Pugs. There is no guarantee that the health issues will be resolved, or that it won't include a raft of other issues arising from both parents. But, I'm not a vet, so I don't see what they see.

It's worth attending some dog shows to have a look at them, and meet a few. There are a few small dog breeds that might work for you, and it's so much better to actually see them and meet them in person.

#8 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:32 PM

Yeah, pug cross breeds are almost as prevalent as oodles. Puggles, Jugs, pugaliers, there are heaps of them.  No idea what they are like, and their physical attributes seem to vary wildly. So be careful. Pugs have been bred as companions, and have a great personality due to that. I’m all for breeding out their squashed faces, but once you start crossing them with hunting dogs, for example, you’re compromising their gentle attitudes.

Definitely look at Pug rescue, but from what I have seen they don’t offer their dogs to families where there will be no one home during the day. If you follow Pug rescue on Facebook, or their web page, you get a very good (and depressing) idea of the health issues that Pugs can face. It may turn you off the breed entirely. Just remember, rescue groups get the worst cases.

Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 13 October 2019 - 03:34 PM.


#9 Ayr

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:49 PM

Definitely research breeders. Sure they're known for health issues and breathing problems but you can minimise this by finding a good reputable breeder, regardless what the haters tell you, they're out there.
We have dogs that are known for health issues related to breathing and heart and all are various ages now, from 2-10 and all are healthy, no issues and all bought from very well known in the industry, reputable breeders that have worked hard to minimise issues. I'd recommend a decent breeder of pugs than a BYB of cross breeds unless you are looking at a rescue.

Join some pug groups on Facebook etc, see what breeders people recommend. Look at dogzonline and find some breeder names to enquire to and ask about on fb etc. You'll find the right breeder with some research. And they don't all suffer from expensive health issues. Beautiful dogs, I'd love a platinum pink or champagne pink down the track, I know a good breeder in QLD who is breeding these colours. But not for a long, long time, we have enough animals for many years yet!!

Edited by Ayr, 13 October 2019 - 03:52 PM.


#10 *bibs*

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:11 PM

I have had two, both male an female.  My sister has a female pug.

All of them have had beautiful temperaments and are great with children.  All have been able to be trained well (follow commands etc).
All have had major health issues.

Kidney problems, allergies leading to extreme skin conditions and epilepsy in my sisters pug.  

Some people mention breathing problems but this is how they are born. They will snort and huff and puff a lot more than any other dog that doesn't have a 'squashy' face.

They are a beautiful dog but be aware of the possible health problems that may arise (which can happen in all breeds of dogs anyway).

I say go for it!!!

#11 Nasty Teens

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:45 PM

We have a jack Russell pug cross from a local rescue organisation. Allergies are an issue and we need to be on top of eye care. His family and our friends and family he loves. People out in public he doesn't care about, pat me, admire me or don't, whatever. He naturally walks to heel. Will follow dh from sun up to sun down given the option. Otherwise he wants to cuddle up. Food motivated while being very fussy. Can follow voice commmands but has a definite "I can't hear you" attitude when he wants. In the end his people are the most important to him and he is happy when with us, sleeps when not.

#12 marple

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:01 PM

View Posttenar, on 13 October 2019 - 02:36 PM, said:

I wouldn't get a breed with such a predictable built-in health problem.

Have you considered other low-exercise small dogs, something like a whippet maybe?

Any and all dogs will require as a bare minimum 30 minutes of walking every day for its entire life.  Puppies of most breeds will require more and obviously more active breeds need more than that.  As a young adult my miniature schnauzer needed an hour or more each day, though that reduced as she aged.

So even for a pug, even for a whippet, someone needs the time to walk it for at least 30 minutes every day.  A yard to run in, however large, (most dogs won't do much running on their own anyway) is not a substitute for daily walks.

Ours is not a pug, but he is not walked everyday. He is a big boofy Shepherd. We walk him about 3 - 4 times a week. I'm sure a lot of dogs are walked similarly. He is an indoor dog though and rarely alone so I'm not sure if that makes a difference.
Personally OP I'm not a fan of pugs ( they snort and snore and the only one I knew seems to have been the only cranky one) but if you are happy with that  I hope you enjoy your pup.

Edited by marple, 13 October 2019 - 05:25 PM.


#13 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:30 PM

My friend who is a vet says steer clear of pugs. Sorry to say as they are adorable looking things and no doubt have lovely temperments.

#14 littlepickle

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:27 PM

My mother has a pug who is now 9 years old (male). A lovely friendly dog who lives with an older female dog (different breed) and a 17 year old cat.
- very food orientated to the point that he needs meals weighed and kept away from the cat food in order to keep his weight within check.
- suffers from terrible hay fever and requires antihistamines
- sensitive skin
- face needs washing 2-3 times per day to reduce build up in skin folds.
- recently required eye surgery for a corneal ulcer (they are prone to eye issues) and now needs drops for life.

I find him an active dog that requires walking twice per day otherwise he goes a bit crazy but this could be an individual dog need rather than breed specific.

Good luck

#15 OceanTwentyFour

Posted 14 October 2019 - 06:20 PM

Quote

Any and all dogs will require as a bare minimum 30 minutes of walking every day for its entire life.  Puppies of most breeds will require more and obviously more active breeds need more than that.  As a young adult my miniature schnauzer needed an hour or more each day, though that reduced as she aged.

So even for a pug, even for a whippet, someone needs the time to walk it for at least 30 minutes every day.  A yard to run in, however large, (most dogs won't do much running on their own anyway) is not a substitute for daily walks.

We were told in puppy school at the RSPCA that a 5 minute walk where the dog can stop and sniff is much better than a 30 minute walk where the dog is not allowed to sniff anything. Yes dogs need exercise but I don't think people should beat themselves up if they can't walk their dogs everyday. Mental stimulation is just as important and as long as the dog is getting several walks a week I think that's okay.

#16 FiveAus

Posted 14 October 2019 - 06:42 PM

They are gorgeous dogs but there are a lot of badly bred ones around. But there are also some awesome, amazing breeders who breed great little dogs who are very capable of living an active, long and healthy life.

#17 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 14 October 2019 - 07:11 PM

View PostOceanTwentyFour, on 14 October 2019 - 06:20 PM, said:

We were told in puppy school at the RSPCA that a 5 minute walk where the dog can stop and sniff is much better than a 30 minute walk where the dog is not allowed to sniff anything. Yes dogs need exercise but I don't think people should beat themselves up if they can't walk their dogs everyday. Mental stimulation is just as important and as long as the dog is getting several walks a week I think that's okay.

I have heard those Kong toys are excellent for keeping dogs occupied as it challenges the dog a bit before it can release the treat.




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