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Baby Budget Five Month


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#26 Paddlepop

Posted 13 October 2019 - 03:57 PM

There's no need to sterilise bottles and teats if the water you wash them in is reliably safe for drinking. If you're on town water you should be fine. If you're using tank, creek, bore or other untreated water then you'd need to sterilise. A good hot soapy wash removing all traces of milk, a hot rinse, and leave to air dry is all that is needed. Baby is probably shoving all sorts of things in his mouth anyway, and they sure aren't sterilised.

Absolutely do not change the bottles to a different type. Babies can be very particular. At the very least you need to use the same type of bottle teat so it feels the same in his mouth and flows at the same rate.

As baby gets older you'll need to add in things like sippy cups and non-breakable food plates and bowls. Also he'll need soft soled shoes when out once he can walk confidently.

Toothbrush, nail clipper/scissors, hair brush or comb are other things that you'll need for him. Teething gel and teething rings if he has a bad time with teething. Hopefully he'll sail through and not have pain from his teeth.

#27 Feral33

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:11 PM

I don't understand any of this. Why is your income less than $200 a week? Why is childcare only $30 a day? This isn't a school project is it.

#28 José

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:13 PM

 Sweet.Pea, on 13 October 2019 - 03:12 PM, said:



Do you live in a studio? The whole house will need to be baby proofed, not just a room.



from previous posts the OPs rents a room in a share house.

#29 fig_jam

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:21 PM

OP is only including income he will get from having his baby. He isn't including his income from his employment,  which he has made clear in other threads he is not prepared to use for his child's expenses.

I feel so sorry for this poor unwanted bubba. I hope they are far away from the OP before they are old enough to pick up on the vibe the OP will only tolerate them around if it is cost neutral.

#30 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:30 PM

Those nappies really are an odd size for a 5mth old. I may not have had an infant for a while but I’m pretty sure 5mth olds are like 8-10kg.

Look, it is admirable that you want to care for the baby but I think your thinking about it is too narrow. Have you thought about what you are going to do with the baby to spend time with him? Will you be staying at home / if so do you have books, toys, perhaps a play gym or bath toys? If you plan to go on outings where will you go? Have you looked at local parks or streets that will provide things of interest to stimulate baby? Investigated the local playgroup, toy library or child health centre?

Preparing to care for baby is not only about working out how much money they cost a day. Can you really get that much FTB if baby isn’t primarily living with you? What is the minimum % of care before you receive an amount? Also childcare centres generally close at least two weeks a year, usually over Christmas, so you need to plan for alternate care more than 51 weeks most likely.

I think you need to think more widely and deeply about this.

#31 Crazyone26989

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:40 PM

 fig_jam, on 13 October 2019 - 04:21 PM, said:

OP is only including income he will get from having his baby. He isn't including his income from his employment,  which he has made clear in other threads he is not prepared to use for his child's expenses.

I feel so sorry for this poor unwanted bubba. I hope they are far away from the OP before they are old enough to pick up on the vibe the OP will only tolerate them around if it is cost neutral.

Ah I see. Now I understand the spreadsheet. But wow, I don’t even know what to say about refusing to use income form work on your child.

#32 Ivy Ivy

Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:42 PM

It's good you're being so organised with the budget.  I think we plan around what worries us most.  The years I lived in abject poverty I too was often worried about having enough money for food and transport etc.

When pregnant and inexperienced with kids, I was most worried about what to DO with a baby while they were awake.  So unsure, I asked the nurse during prenatal classes, when she was teaching us about sleep/tired signs and play periods - I actually said, "what do I do with the baby while she's awake?"  Thank God for practical baby nurses who hide their shock at ineptitude, and just answer the question.  BTW the answer was, play, talk, stimulate, carry and go for a little walk, point out trees and stuff, things like that.  Be together, be calm, happy, tune into the baby's mood state, observe them and react accordingly.

Anyway for your situation, now you've got the budget more sorted, I think it'd be really good if you organised the emotional and other practical sides of parenting.  Organise now, people you could call on if, during the upcoming weekend with the baby, it becomes overwhelming or upsetting, or even just if you're not sure what to do.  People you can either telephone for advice, or go visit.  Also maybe timetable something in, e.g. a walk to the shops to meet a friend for a coffee, or a visit with nearby family if possible.  Look at whether local Dad's groups meet on a Saturday for a park play?

Because I know I'd have found it very emotionally difficult just suddenly being handed a 5-month old and having to care for the baby all weekend, without experience, or support structures in place.  In such a situation, I'd have become really overwhelmed.  Really angry and easily irritated with the sudden sleep deprivation at the end of a tiring working week.

It's useful to have a plan about what to do if you get angry - I've had mums tell me they put the baby down somewhere safe and walk away until they've calmed down, for instance.  It's gruelling, looking after such a dependant young thing all alone.  Catching up with a friend or family member will allow you to converse with an adult and recalibrate stress levels.

You can post questions here for practical parenting advice.

#33 MissBehaving

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:18 PM

Did you do this budget up to either charge the mother the calculated $788 or are expecting a reduction in Child Support for this amount due to having 48 hours of care??

#34 SplashingRainbows

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:41 PM

 Feral33, on 13 October 2019 - 04:11 PM, said:

I don't understand any of this. Why is your income less than $200 a week? Why is childcare only $30 a day? This isn't a school project is it.

I’ve wondered this more than once!

#35 Freddie'sMum

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:45 PM

God help me.  It all seems to me that you are so money focussed you are missing the bigger picture here. Have you spent any time caring for your son by yourself?

Duplicate whatever the mother is doing in terms of bottles and formula etc.  What's his routine like? Ask his mother what his day is like? Does he nap? How many times a day?  Does he need help (rocking, patting) to get to sleep?

Focus on the caring part of looking after your son not a bloody spreadsheet.

#36 Ivy Ivy

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:46 PM

 fig_jam, on 13 October 2019 - 04:21 PM, said:

OP is only including income he will get from having his baby. He isn't including his income from his employment,  which he has made clear in other threads he is not prepared to use for his child's expenses.


I don't understand the thinking - who does the OP think should pay for all the baby's costs of living if not him, if he is the baby's father?  The other parent 100%?  The taxpayers?

From PPs I thought the OP was hoping to save to buy a house, thus being v. frugal.  (And I just assume once reality hits and he realises how easier it is to have, say, 6 bottles c.w. 2,  and 8 onsies rather than 3, etc etc, the mortgage plan will stretch to a later timeline, as it does for everyone once they're actually financing their kids costs.)

#37 Silverstreak

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:47 PM

Can't remember if a pram's been mentioned, but a pram is great for getting out and about with your baby and having them enjoy the weather. A baby carrier is good as well for walking around the shops, going for coffee etc or just pottering around the house tidying up with baby.

Can't remember if you've got a baby bath, or if you're going to shower with baby? Actually, I think up to a certain point I was just bathing baby in the bathroom sink, but we weren't living in a share house.

Test the temperature of water and formula on the inside of your wrist to make sure it's not too hot and when bathing your baby, gently support their head with your hand, if necessary.

Sometimes babies will need a burp after a feed, so keeping them upright and gently rubbing their back to encourage a burp is good.

Our baby was on solids by five months, so check what foods your baby is already eating.

You'll want comfortable, breathable clothing, depending on the season, as well as bibs and face washers (particularly when your baby is eating solids.)

Sorry, can't remember if a high chair was mentioned, but they're really handy and you can get ones that are cheap and easy to clean from Ikea.

Are you able to purchase a cot? If you have a cot, make sure there are no toys, pillows etc in the cot and if there's a blanket, that the blanket runs up to your baby's waist only and tucks on either side of the mattress. Special baby sleeping bags can be good, e.g. Merino Kids ones. I guess it depends on what weather you're currently having.

Consider ringing your local council and seeing your local Maternal Child Health Nurse, they can give you tips and tricks, check your child's milestones, run local playgroups etc and there might be a parent's group or father's group that you can join for support as well.

#38 rubyskye

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:48 PM

 fig_jam, on 13 October 2019 - 04:21 PM, said:

OP is only including income he will get from having his baby. He isn't including his income from his employment,  which he has made clear in other threads he is not prepared to use for his child's expenses.

I feel so sorry for this poor unwanted bubba. I hope they are far away from the OP before they are old enough to pick up on the vibe the OP will only tolerate them around if it is cost neutral.

This. I get so upset reading OP posts and worried about the care and welfare of this poor baby. The financial fixation and home environment I find concerning.

#39 rubyskye

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:50 PM

 Freddie, on 13 October 2019 - 05:45 PM, said:

God help me.  It all seems to me that you are so money focussed you are missing the bigger picture here. Have you spent any time caring for your son by yourself?

Duplicate whatever the mother is doing in terms of bottles and formula etc.  What's his routine like? Ask his mother what his day is like? Does he nap? How many times a day?  Does he need help (rocking, patting) to get to sleep?

Focus on the caring part of looking after your son not a bloody spreadsheet.

Absolutely agree!

#40 born.a.girl

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:53 PM

From memory, in your last thread, you hadn't seen the baby for a month. At that age anyone they haven't seen for a month is likely to be a stranger to them.  It's hard enough for a primary carer to settle and entertain a five month old, much less someone who has had almost nothing to do with them.

Is there anyone in the share house who has any experience with parenting, or childminding?  You may need to enlist their help.

You've got a reasonable chance of ending up with a baby crying in distress for a good portion of that time.  I know this sounds negative, but it's the reality.

Please, please, I know the mother needs support, but start with six hours during the day, when she can sleep or do whatever she wants to do, before launching straight into 48 hours with a baby to whom you're a stranger.

#41 Silverstreak

Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:53 PM

And that's a good point that PPs are making about your baby's routine.

It can be all about routine at that age. So find out how many bottles per day and what meals at what time, when they're put down for a nap et cetera.

I roughly followed eat, play, sleep, eat, play, sleep, but every baby is different.

Look up baby massage on the internet, it's good to relax both baby and you and could aid in sleep.

I actually kept a diary of all food and drink my baby had for quite a while, as it made it easy to track and made me feel more in control.

If it's a nice day, grab a blanket and lay baby on the blanket on the ground (or at the park) in the shade, so you can both enjoy the sky and trees and get out of the house.

And if you get stuck, ask for help and don't be afraid to ask your ex partner for advice. This is a steep learning curve for you.

#42 CoffeeGuy

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:31 PM

The baby budget is baby related income and expense.

I have another budget for my work income, personal expenses unrelated to baby such as motor vehicle maintenance costs, fuel consumption, maintenance schedule, food, luxury spending etc.  It does not make sense to me to included that all in the baby budget.

Childcare is minus 85% of the cost after childcare subsidy.

I'll have a look into special baby activities.

Quote

Did you do this budget up to either charge the mother the calculated $788 or are expecting a reduction in Child Support for this amount due to having 48 hours of care??

No, I asked the real estate if I could have the baby over and they said it would be fine so I told mother I would give it a try looking after him.  I have to buy a few things and wanted to make a budget.  I like spreadsheets.

 Expelliarmus, on 13 October 2019 - 04:30 PM, said:

Can you really get that much FTB if baby isn’t primarily living with you? What is the minimum % of care before you receive an amount? Also childcare centres generally close at least two weeks a year, usually over Christmas, so you need to plan for alternate care more than 51 weeks most likely.

No, that is if I had 100% care. I don't know the minimum amount of care before you get a bit of the family tax benefit.  Darn, I didn't know child care centres don't care year round I'll have to figure out a solution which might be taking a couple weeks off work each year.

I was going to use laundry sink for bath which is what he does at mothers house.

I'm thinking of getting a carrier as they seem more practical/less bulky than prams.  Are they?

Edited by CoffeeGuy, 13 October 2019 - 06:34 PM.


#43 JomoMum

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:36 PM

 CoffeeGuy, on 13 October 2019 - 06:31 PM, said:

The baby budget is baby related income and expense.

I have another budget for my work income, personal expenses unrelated to baby such as motor vehicle maintenance costs, fuel consumption, maintenance schedule, food, luxury spending etc.  It does not make sense to me to included that all in the baby budget.

Childcare is minus 85% of the cost after childcare subsidy.

I'll have a look into special baby activities.



No, I asked the real estate if I could have the baby over and they said it would be fine so I told mother I would give it a try looking after him.  I have to buy a few things and wanted to make a budget.  I like spreadsheets.



No, that is if I had 100% care. I don't know the minimum amount of care before you get a bit of the family tax benefit.  Darn, I didn't know child care centres don't care year round I'll have to figure out a solution which might be taking a couple weeks off work each year.

This is ALL still about money!

Have you even read the questions about caring for a baby??

Are you feeling in yourself that you’re well equipped mentally and emotionally? NOT financially.

I feel like you’re in complete denial about the gravity of this and trying to focus on one simple thing you can possibly control - ingoing and outgoing expenses.

Edited by JomoMum, 13 October 2019 - 06:50 PM.


#44 Sweet.Pea

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:36 PM

 rubyskye, on 13 October 2019 - 05:48 PM, said:



This. I get so upset reading OP posts and worried about the care and welfare of this poor baby. The financial fixation and home environment I find concerning.

I want to go pick this baby up and give the mother a break!

Yes babies cost money and sometimes you can't buy everything, but to have the money and refuse to spend it makes me feel sad.

The baby needs to be loved and FEEL loved.

#45 Allegra99

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:40 PM

 CoffeeGuy, on 13 October 2019 - 06:31 PM, said:

The baby budget is baby related income and expense.

I have another budget for my work income, personal expenses unrelated to baby such as motor vehicle maintenance costs, fuel consumption, maintenance schedule, food, luxury spending etc.  It does not make sense to me to included that all in the baby budget.


No, what everyone else does is add baby expenses to their budget, not draw up a separate budget for their children. It doesn’t make sense. You and your child are one and the same for budgeting purposes.

#46 ~J_F~

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:45 PM

If this is legit, which I hope it isn’t... it’s messed up.

He is your kid, you don’t try and budget him in, you just do it because that’s what bloody parents do!!

Edited to remove the swearing but it doesn’t have the same impact :(

Edited by ~J_F~, 13 October 2019 - 07:00 PM.


#47 born.a.girl

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:45 PM

 CoffeeGuy, on 13 October 2019 - 06:31 PM, said:

The baby budget is baby related income and expense.

I have another budget for my work income, personal expenses unrelated to baby such as motor vehicle maintenance costs, fuel consumption, maintenance schedule, food, luxury spending etc.  It does not make sense to me to included that all in the baby budget.




You and your baby are now a family.  You have a family budget, and family expenses.


ETA: I do hope it's just a lighbulb moment that you need to have.  Otherwise what are you going to do with long term expenses?   turn the light on in the middle of the night to change the baby - whoops best move $1.36 from the 'my' budget to the 'baby' budget.

I know part of you is probably freaking out at how you'll manage if his mother does decide to move away and leave him with you. That's when you turn to EB for support in ways to make it work - for both of you.

ETA: (2)  Contact some support service places like St Kilda Mums if you're in Melbourne to see if they can help you with a pram.  A carrier is a great idea if you're wanting to get stuff done, and the baby likes being close to you.  It can be hard on your back though - I couldn't use one, and a pram is a lovely way to get a baby to sleep out on a nice day. Your son is old enough to be able to see up through the trees, notice birds etc.

Edited by born.a.girl, 13 October 2019 - 06:50 PM.


#48 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:46 PM

 CoffeeGuy, on 13 October 2019 - 06:31 PM, said:

The baby budget is baby related income and expense.

I have another budget for my work income, personal expenses unrelated to baby such as motor vehicle maintenance costs, fuel consumption, maintenance schedule, food, luxury spending etc.  It does not make sense to me to included that all in the baby budget.

Childcare is minus 85% of the cost after childcare subsidy.

I'll have a look into special baby activities.



No, I asked the real estate if I could have the baby over and they said it would be fine so I told mother I would give it a try looking after him.  I have to buy a few things and wanted to make a budget.  I like spreadsheets.



No, that is if I had 100% care. I don't know the minimum amount of care before you get a bit of the family tax benefit.  Darn, I didn't know child care centres don't care year round I'll have to figure out a solution which might be taking a couple weeks off work each year.

I was going to use laundry sink for bath which is what he does at mothers house.

I'm thinking of getting a carrier as they seem more practical/less bulky than prams.  Are they?
I hate to break it to you, but extricating baby care from the work income etc will be impossible. FTB is not enough to care for a child. You will need, at some point to use money from your personal income to care for your personal child.

And yes, most childcare centres close for two weeks at a minimum.

You will only be entitled to FTB if you care for the child 35% of the time or more. https://guides.dss.g...-guide/2/1/1/25

Edited by Expelliarmus, 13 October 2019 - 06:47 PM.


#49 Crazyone26989

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:56 PM

Ugh...OP you do realise that not every one has “baby income”, right? Most people have to use their “work income” to pay for their baby.

On the daycare, a lot in Sydney do actually open 52 weeks a year. Everyone I have looked at has but I am in the Inner West so I don’t know if that is why.

#50 Claudia Jean

Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:58 PM

 born.a.girl, on 13 October 2019 - 06:45 PM, said:


ETA: (2)  Contact some support service places like St Kilda Mums if you're in Melbourne to see if they can help you with a pram.  A carrier is a great idea if you're wanting to get stuff done, and the baby likes being close to you.  It can be hard on your back though - I couldn't use one, and a pram is a lovely way to get a baby to sleep out on a nice day. Your son is old enough to be able to see up through the trees, notice birds etc.

Just on this point, St Kilda Mums dont deal directly with recipients. I'd suggest contacting a social worker but since OP isn't in financial difficulty, but is actually just a tight-a*se, there may be limited support they can provide/ that will be recieved..




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