Jump to content

Has the OTC codiene ban done any good, or just inconvenienced the average Jo?


  • Please log in to reply
74 replies to this topic

#1 JediMaster

Posted 10 October 2019 - 01:01 AM

Went to have one of my mersyndols at bedtime tonight, and realised I only have 1 left. Argh.
As an aside an acquaintance had a miserable long weekend after having a medical procedure done on Friday afternoon and being advised to simply "take panadol" for the pain.

#2 MooGuru

Posted 10 October 2019 - 01:08 AM

https://www1.racgp.o...as-made-prescri

This might be of interest.

#3 mum2345

Posted 10 October 2019 - 02:13 AM

View PostJediMaster, on 10 October 2019 - 01:01 AM, said:

Went to have one of my mersyndols at bedtime tonight, and realised I only have 1 left. Argh.
As an aside an acquaintance had a miserable long weekend after having a medical procedure done on Friday afternoon and being advised to simply "take panadol" for the pain.

To answer the question in the thread title, it's done both.

Overdoses are down - as seen in the article the PP linked, and it has also inconvenienced the average Jo, as seen in your anecdotes about yourself and your acquaintance.

#4 Ayr

Posted 10 October 2019 - 05:31 AM

Just been an inconvenience for me personally. My Dr gives it easy enough but it's now more expensive for less has been my experience and the hassle of remembering to get a prescription and have it on me for the chemist.

I don't think it was a good change myself but I'm starting to not need it as much by ordering another product from overseas that is more natural and seem to be working for me. So like everything they control here people just get something else that works from overseas (like melatonin for example) this is no different.

#5 HippyDippyBaloney

Posted 10 October 2019 - 05:34 AM

My ex used to be addicted to codeine and alcohol. The ban actually made him stop taking codeine, which previously he had tried many times and was unable to stop. He had been to NA and many drs to assist in helping him wean off, tried going cold turkey but he never was able to stop taking them.

It also was a contributing factor that lead him to get sober from alcohol as well. So while anecdotal, I feel it must have done good.

#6 nom_de_plume

Posted 10 October 2019 - 05:49 AM

I’m allergic to codeine so it makes no difference to me.

It’s been inconvenient for people I know who can take codeine, however not necessarily a bad thing. DP (for example) used to take codeine instead of paracetamol or ibuprofen, and hasn’t been to the doctor for a script yet. Just takes OTC pain when needed. My Mum has finally had to address the source of her chronic pain issues rather than self medicate with codeine and ignore them.

Overall, I think it’s had the desired effect.

#7 IamzFeralz

Posted 10 October 2019 - 05:57 AM

View PostMooGuru, on 10 October 2019 - 01:08 AM, said:

https://www1.racgp.o...as-made-prescri

This might be of interest.

A 50% drop in overdoses is massive.

#8 gracie1978

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:12 AM

I think post surgery doctors still aren't in the habit of prescribing enough.

My sister had a miserable weekend a few weeks ago, the doctor didn't give her enough and Panadol wasn't sufficient.

However I'd rather we were all a bit sore and sad and fewer people OD'd.

I'll be getting all the good drugs after my upcoming c section.

#9 1975ladybug

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:12 AM

I had to get a script from the doctor for the smallest dose possible for migraines, luckily they are few and far between, it’s taken me since the ban was imposed to run out, well they expired and I ended up throwing some out. But the current lot have a 12 month expiry.

It may have reduced the amount of overdoses significantly, but for me it’s inconvenient.

#10 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:21 AM

Inconvenient for me.

Go for a long family drive, realise you don’t have medications (as new car an you realise you didn’t transfer your car stash of medications) and can’t get something OTC while out, so by the time you get home you end up horribly sick with migraine and end up incapacitated in bed rather than functional.

ETA pharmacist complained too saying they still sell just as much codeine, but their clients are inconvenienced by needing to get script..... this was when I went to get migraine tablets and told they are in short supply and out of stock and Dr didn’t warn me or offer alternative like codeine to tide me over.

Edited by Veritas Vinum Arte, 10 October 2019 - 06:24 AM.


#11 steppy

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:51 AM

I've read that they're looking at Panadol now as more people are taking too much and so I guess in the end we will just have herbal remedies or grow our own pain plants.

#12 steppy

Posted 10 October 2019 - 06:58 AM

https://www1.racgp.o...duce-paracetamo

So really just made people switch drug which means the average Jo ends up with nothing because of these 'lives are worth everyone suffering' types. Remind me of birthers.

Edited by steppy, 10 October 2019 - 06:58 AM.


#13 AliasMater

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:01 AM

We stocked up before the ban, and just now I realised I have been taking expired medication. Meh, I will continue to take it to save myself an $80 trip to the GP. I have autoimmune arthritis but can't have NSAIDs including prescription Naproxen so I need the Paracetamol with codeine.

#14 NeedSleepNow

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:09 AM

I have endometriosis. As part of the management plan I only  have a break from the pill every 3-4 months. I used to be able to use panadeine as part of the pain management during the tail ends, and for any breakthrough pain in the middle. Nothing has changed, except I’m now prescribed panadeine forte instead now. So I guess my usage has increased with the ban.
I am working on better management solutions. However, I need to make a decision about whether we are having more children before I can explore some of the other options...

#15 TrixieBelden

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:10 AM

I read the ‘overdose decrease’ stuff on a medical forum and it didn’t really answer a lot from me, I’ll have to look out more information. Self-reported ‘overdoses’ I would have thought will include at least some people concerned that they inadvertently took slightly more than is permitted over a 24 hour period.   I didn’t get a sense of how morbidity or mortality could have been affected by the change from reading that. Resolved to look into it further but got distracted.

I am reading the ‘drs don’t prescribe enough post surgery’ comments and recalling a recent thread on which posters were outraged by and frankly rude to prescribers who offered them opiates as an option post-procedure.

#16 born.a.girl

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:17 AM

View PostTrixieBelden, on 10 October 2019 - 07:10 AM, said:

I read the ‘overdose decrease’ stuff on a medical forum and it didn’t really answer a lot from me, I’ll have to look out more information. Self-reported ‘overdoses’ I would have thought will include at least some people concerned that they inadvertently took slightly more than is permitted over a 24 hour period.   I didn’t get a sense of how morbidity or mortality could have been affected by the change from reading that. Resolved to look into it further but got distracted.

I am reading the ‘drs don’t prescribe enough post surgery’ comments and recalling a recent thread on which posters were outraged by and frankly rude to prescribers who offered them opiates as an option post-procedure.


That was my first thought, too.

I haven't read the article yet, but I can imagine what you're talking about with self-reported.  It was 'only' panadol osteo, but my MIL was paranoid about taking it even fifteen minutes early.  If she'd accidentally been an hour early she'd have been seriously worried.

#17 Lunafreya

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:27 AM

Once I was in the ED and I was given Panadol an hour after I’d taken some. There was a shift change and the previous dose wasn’t written down.

The staff did not like me questioning them

#18 born.a.girl

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:34 AM

View Postnom_de_plume, on 10 October 2019 - 05:49 AM, said:

I’m allergic to codeine so it makes no difference to me.

It’s been inconvenient for people I know who can take codeine, however not necessarily a bad thing. DP (for example) used to take codeine instead of paracetamol or ibuprofen, and hasn’t been to the doctor for a script yet. Just takes OTC pain when needed. My Mum has finally had to address the source of her chronic pain issues rather than self medicate with codeine and ignore them.

Overall, I think it’s had the desired effect.

I suspect this is not uncommon.   When this was first being talked about, someone in a group I was in said 'but Panadeine and Paracetamol are just two different brands of the same thing' and went on to say they preferred Panadeine because it worked better for them.   Not someone stupid, just someone who'd never given it much thought, and clearly never read the ingredients.  I can't imagine they're the only ones.

I do think having to find out what's causing the pain is a good side effect.  I don't hesitate to take what I need for something I know about (touch wood, migraines very rare now) but when my husband had a 'peculiar' headache that paracetamol wasn't touching, I was ready to take him to emergency if it didn't get better, not dig out the strong stuff.

#19 Chchgirl

Posted 10 October 2019 - 07:58 AM

View Postnom_de_plume, on 10 October 2019 - 05:49 AM, said:

I’m allergic to codeine so it makes no difference to me.

It’s been inconvenient for people I know who can take codeine, however not necessarily a bad thing. DP (for example) used to take codeine instead of paracetamol or ibuprofen, and hasn’t been to the doctor for a script yet. Just takes OTC pain when needed. My Mum has finally had to address the source of her chronic pain issues rather than self medicate with codeine and ignore them.

Overall, I think it’s had the desired effect.

I'm allergic to codeine as well.

#20 rosie28

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:04 AM

A 50% drop in overdoses is amazing; and if there has been no roll in effect to other drugs then that’s great. It has slightly inconvenienced my husband, who uses codeine occasionally for shoulder pain, but that’s nothing compared to the apparent benefits. I imagine it’s an area that will continue to be studied.

DH’s doctor is perfectly happy to prescribe it, the shoulder is as good as it’s going to get without major surgery, and the success rate of the isn’t great so he isn’t rushing to get it done.

Edited by rosie28, 10 October 2019 - 08:06 AM.


#21 Jane Jetson

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:04 AM

It's been a bit of a pain for me. My migraines aren't all that frequent, but my go-to was always to pop an aspirin and go lie down in a dark room for an hour; that would sometimes stop the migraine, and quite often damp it down so that all I felt was dizziness and the one-sided headache - I used to take either Panadeine or Panadol for that, depending how bad it was.

Now I've been trying triptans because my doctor doesn't seem to think codeine should be a thing in migraine, never mind that it helped before. I've now wasted heaps of money on visits and stupid triptans that do work, but none better than aspirin, so I'm still in pain because that's all she'll give me. Nuromol is not as good as Panadeine was.

So I'm back to just managing them myself with aspirin and having to take a day off work if it's a bad painful one. Not an ideal outcome as far as I'm concerned.

I seem to recall EB telling those of us who were concerned that doctors wouldn't prescribe it that we were "catastrophising," lol. Yet here we are.

Stupid migraines.

#22 rosie28

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:08 AM

A few people I know who have migraines have had success with the Panadol that has caffeine in it. My migraines are rare, but I’ve never had any luck with codeine so tend to go the aspirin and anti-inflammatory route which usually works.

#23 Anonforthistime

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:21 AM

For me, it has been quite annoying and actually led to gut issues from taking ibuprofen instead.
I had a fairly horrible start of the year medically, including multiple fractures in my shoulder and 2 major surgeries. Taking nurofen causes gut issues in lots of people and because it is now the easier option (than going to the gp for a prescription for codeine).  


#24 born.a.girl

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:25 AM

View PostJane Jetson, on 10 October 2019 - 08:04 AM, said:

It's been a bit of a pain for me. My migraines aren't all that frequent, but my go-to was always to pop an aspirin and go lie down in a dark room for an hour; that would sometimes stop the migraine, and quite often damp it down so that all I felt was dizziness and the one-sided headache - I used to take either Panadeine or Panadol for that, depending how bad it was.

Now I've been trying triptans because my doctor doesn't seem to think codeine should be a thing in migraine, never mind that it helped before. I've now wasted heaps of money on visits and stupid triptans that do work, but none better than aspirin, so I'm still in pain because that's all she'll give me. Nuromol is not as good as Panadeine was.

So I'm back to just managing them myself with aspirin and having to take a day off work if it's a bad painful one. Not an ideal outcome as far as I'm concerned.

I seem to recall EB telling those of us who were concerned that doctors wouldn't prescribe it that we were "catastrophising," lol. Yet here we are.

Stupid migraines.


When I was still getting them regularly (thank goodness the cause was cured ten years ago) it was during the time doctors stopped giving morphine injections for it, amazing if i had someone to take me.

After they stopped automatically doing that, I was once given an injection of something that's supposed to help some (before triptans, I think), but just made me feel fractionally less bad, then the migraine bounced back and I was actually out of action for longer.

My pattern was to wake in the early hours feeling VERY peculiar, and coedine at that point would nip it completely in the bud.  Any longer and I couldn't keep it down for about 12 hours.

I'd have been changing doctors if they didn't allow me to take what worked best for me, and with a minimal dose - given how well she knew me. Obviously that would have been reflected in the small number that I took overall, of course.

#25 Dianalynch

Posted 10 October 2019 - 08:41 AM

I was in the ED over the weekend, after all the tests and diagnosis stuff I was concerned about breakthrough pain that Panadol and ibuprofen hadn't helped with, had a chat with the resident about pain management and we agreed on a short script of opioids for any breakthrough pain. Which I haven't needed, but it's reassuring to know they're there.

I've had the opposite experience to some PPs, where every Dr, nurse or paramedic I've come across is concerned about pain and the best way of managing it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.