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8 month old and no babbling


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#1 Minnie80

Posted 06 October 2019 - 02:00 AM

Hi,

My DD will be 8 months old in 3 days God willing and she doesn't babble. She started cooing when she was 6 weeks old and has continued to coo but it never transformed to babbling. Lots of oooh ahhh and agooos! But it never transformed into babbling.
My son is borderline ASD and he babbled at five months. But didn't have much receptive or spoken language until 3. I fear she will have speech problems too but probably worse because she is not even babbling.
I read that babbling is vital. But I also read that as long as the child vocalises somehow then it is ok. Is that true?

#2 Sweet.Pea

Posted 06 October 2019 - 03:03 AM

Mine was cooing from about 4 months and didn't babble until around 12 to 13 months. Doesn't say words at 16 months.

I have gone to the child health nurse and the GP and they aren't overly concerned.

Have you seen your GP?

ETA - they have said sounds are what matters.

Edited by Sweet.Pea, 06 October 2019 - 03:04 AM.


#3 Minnie80

Posted 06 October 2019 - 04:36 AM

View PostSweet.Pea, on 06 October 2019 - 03:03 AM, said:

Mine was cooing from about 4 months and didn't babble until around 12 to 13 months. Doesn't say words at 16 months.

I have gone to the child health nurse and the GP and they aren't overly concerned.

Have you seen your GP?

ETA - they have said sounds are what matters.

Yes, and he said as long as she is vocalising, it's ok. But It seems unusual to me.

#4 AliasMater

Posted 06 October 2019 - 06:21 AM

My 11 month old rarely vocalises. DH and I keep track of his vocalizations, he is pretty much silent. He didn't make a peep at all yesterday.

Of course when we had a speech therapy appointment last week, he was making sounds and they were happy and just keep working with him. It wasn't even babble though. Just ahhh and raspberries.

I am concerned, even though they said they were happy. I would suggest getting it checked out if you have concerns OP.

#5 Islander

Posted 06 October 2019 - 06:57 AM

Sound making is great.  Keep giving your daughter opportunities for communication- playing games, singing songs etc where you leave a gap for her turn, and wait for her to vocalise before you continue. Sit and do sound play with her, copy the sounds she is making, going back and forth. I understand that research hasn’t actually shown that number of sounds before 12 months is predictive of anything. Of course you know your daughter best though, and taking her to a speech therapist is never going to hurt.

#6 Minnie80

Posted 06 October 2019 - 04:07 PM

I honestly think that with an ASD brother and cousin, her inability to roll front to back until now and her lack of babbling, her chances of not having ASD or some other kind of developmental disorder is now down to 1 %.

#7 turbulent

Posted 06 October 2019 - 04:31 PM

My daughter has 3 older brothers  with ASD and she does not have Autism, she was never a babbler either. Speech therapist was not concerned, she started verbalising more after 12 months.


#8 newmumandexcited

Posted 06 October 2019 - 07:50 PM

View PostMinnie80, on 06 October 2019 - 04:07 PM, said:

I honestly think that with an ASD brother and cousin, her inability to roll front to back until now and her lack of babbling, her chances of not having ASD or some other kind of developmental disorder is now down to 1 %.

It’s really hard to say with that certainty yet - give it time.

#9 MsLaurie

Posted 06 October 2019 - 08:05 PM

Minnie, even if there’s an issue- what would that change about what you’re doing at this stage? If you’re talking to her to encourage language eventually, giving her floor time to practice rolling/creeping/crawling etc, and giving her access to toys that interest her and encourage her to explore them, then there’s nothing else to do? She’s still a tiny bub.
Are you seeing a doctor or psychologist about your level of worry?

#10 Minnie80

Posted 06 October 2019 - 08:23 PM

View PostMsLaurie, on 06 October 2019 - 08:05 PM, said:

Minnie, even if there’s an issue- what would that change about what you’re doing at this stage? If you’re talking to her to encourage language eventually, giving her floor time to practice rolling/creeping/crawling etc, and giving her access to toys that interest her and encourage her to explore them, then there’s nothing else to do? She’s still a tiny bub.
Are you seeing a doctor or psychologist about your level of worry?

I know you mean well. But how can a mom with a child with ASD not worry? It's been difficult for us. When you see a potential problem in your child, then you worry

#11 Sweet.Pea

Posted 06 October 2019 - 08:38 PM

View PostMinnie80, on 06 October 2019 - 08:23 PM, said:



I know you mean well. But how can a mom with a child with ASD not worry? It's been difficult for us. When you see a potential problem in your child, then you worry

You have a child that has been diagnosed with ASD, but it doesn't mean your daughter has it.

There may be a higher chance that she does, but there may be things that she does that other children aren't doing.

Something I find important to remember is that children develop at different rates. Try not to let yourself focus on one thing and look at the whole development stage.

Is she sitting?
Is she trying to move?
Is she able to feed herself/does she eat well?
Does she smile and make eye contact? React to her name? Turn to sounds?

This is likely how to doctor assessed her. If you feel you need a second opinion, perhaps see another doctor, but try not to worry :)

#12 MsLaurie

Posted 07 October 2019 - 03:10 AM

View PostMinnie80, on 06 October 2019 - 08:23 PM, said:



I know you mean well. But how can a mom with a child with ASD not worry? It's been difficult for us. When you see a potential problem in your child, then you worry

I get it, I do. We’ve been on a is-it-something-if-so-what journey with my older daughter for over a year now. And the worry and hyper-vigilance had me constantly watching her and comparing her to others,  and going down internet rabbit holes in the wee hours to try to understand.
And it made me sick, to the point of having a crying meltdown and ending up at the doctors, and then seeing a psych to help. Where I got to is that worrying constantly wasn’t helping. Do the therapies - which are basically talk and play and engage- but that’s really the only thing. The worrying isn’t productive, and only takes up my time and sucks away my happiness.
My little daughter is a month older than yours, and there is the temptation to compare her with her sister and try and figure if she’s on the same path or not, but she’s her own little self and it’s not helpful. She’s different, our family is different this time, but if there is something well at least this time we already have a paediatrician and a speechie!
Good luck, and please look after yourself. It made a huge difference to me to stop fretting constantly. There’s only so much room in my head, I need it for useful tasks, i’m sure you’re the same.




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