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#51 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 19 September 2019 - 06:49 PM

View Postgracie1978, on 19 September 2019 - 04:57 PM, said:

When we bought our house 6 years ago insurability was absolutely something I considered and checked before committing.
For the life of me I can't work out why anyone would buy right on the water and I'm terrified of fires, so the bush was out for me.

I am the same as you.  But I will mention a friend at work bought his house 20ish years ago, its in suburbia but near a national park. The bushfire risk has increased a lot in that time due to more extreme weather events we are having.

#52 born.a.girl

Posted 19 September 2019 - 07:04 PM

View PostWannabeMasterchef, on 19 September 2019 - 06:44 PM, said:

How much would the premiums in a fire prone area be?

My parents are on a pension and for their 300K home which they own I think their insurance is about $300 a year.  Not in a fire or flood prone area though.Genuinely asking - I imagine it varies a lot on location

.I wonder if there are any (non predatory) loan schemes pensioners could use in that situation?


Pensioners can access the equity in their home without affecting their pension:

https://www.smh.com....509-p4ze6z.html

It was very true years ago that many pensioners could be asset rich and cash poor, with little way to access that equity.  There have been industry products, some of which had drawbacks, but this one is run by Centrelink.


When we cleared out my husband's friend's place last year, knowing little about his circumstances, I was really pleased to find that he'd taken out a reverse mortgage.  Along with a tiny pension from his own $40 super balance, it enabled him to live a comfortable life as opposed to a frugal one.  He left his property to two organisations, so there were no dependents missing out on anything.

#53 MooGuru

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:14 PM

View PostMollycoddle, on 19 September 2019 - 04:24 PM, said:



So decline it.  I'm pretty sure it actually has to be approved by the person/cause the funds are raising money for...

Unless things have changed - nope.  We had 2 set up using our story by other people. One genuine. One fake. The media relations person at the hospital followed up to get the fake one shut down. We were never contacted or had to verify anything for either.

Edited to clarify other people set it up. Not us.

Edited by MooGuru, 19 September 2019 - 10:01 PM.


#54 #notallcats

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:47 PM

Charities are missing out because of Gofundme or whatever.  Why should one person with cancer, asd or another tragic situation be given $500k  but not another?  I'd rather (and do) give to charities to distribute  funds fairly.

#55 casime

Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:53 PM

I won't donate to anything via Go Fund Me.

I really disagree with Luke getting over half a million dollars in the last few days.  He has no worse of a story than many other families, and he chose to leave his family to take a gamble on a reality show (twice).  It didn't pay off.

I bought a lotto ticket tonight and didn't win anything.  That was a gamble that didn't pay off.  Can someone raise me my $150 million now?

If you decide to travel without insurance, then why should I have to pay for that?  If you want vet fees paid, then why is that my responsibility?  I already pay the vet fees for five dogs and a cat, why should I pay yours too?

#56 Mollycoddle

Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:24 PM

View PostMooGuru, on 19 September 2019 - 08:14 PM, said:



Unless things have changed - nope.  We had 2 set up using our story by other people. One genuine. One fake. The media relations person at the hospital followed up to get the fake one shut down. We were never contacted or had to verify anything for either.

Edited to clarify other people set it up. Not us.

I worded it poorly, what I meant  was that you can get it shut down if you don't agree with them raising money for you.

#57 Ayr

Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:49 PM

I don't donate to go fund me pages for anything. The only ones I usually see floating around aren't people in dire need, they're just people who want stuff they can't afford so want others to pay for it. I'm sure there's genuine ones around but the only one so get on fb or wherever are ones like that. So I steer clear all together. Would rather save the little money I have for charities I believe in and school find raising etc.

#58 76 others

Posted 20 September 2019 - 10:58 PM

View Postcasime, on 19 September 2019 - 10:53 PM, said:

I won't donate to anything via Go Fund Me.

I really disagree with Luke getting over half a million dollars in the last few days.  He has no worse of a story than many other families, and he chose to leave his family to take a gamble on a reality show (twice).  It didn't pay off.

I bought a lotto ticket tonight and didn't win anything.  That was a gamble that didn't pay off.  Can someone raise me my $150 million now?

If you decide to travel without insurance, then why should I have to pay for that?  If you want vet fees paid, then why is that my responsibility?  I already pay the vet fees for five dogs and a cat, why should I pay yours too?

Well obviously it did pay off.

I don't get the Luke hate. He put himself out there. It's like so many situations where there are people doing it just as tough. Why do some dv murders get so much media attention and others get none? Same with missing kids? Same with others who have illness. Why do some charities make more money than others. Why is the pink breast cancer campaign more popular than prostate? They put them selves out there more and marketed themselves better.

#59 -Emissary-

Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:11 AM

I don’t get the frustration or angst. If you don’t agree with it then don’t donate. No one is being forced to donate to anything. Who cares what other people are trying to raise for and who cares if they get a donation or not.

I donate to ones I feel like supporting which is usually shared by my friends for certain things.

On the topic of insurances, I completely agree with car insurances as the risk of a car accident is quite high if you drive frequently.

However, I can understand why people may not have home or content insurances when their house is nowhere near a disaster prone area. The risk of your house burning may be there but it is significantly lower. People are allowed to weigh up the risk and make a choice whether they want to insure it or not.

If you’re struggling financially and weighing up whether to take the risk with no insurances vs feeding your family, I can see why someone would choose to feed their family first.

It is easy to say “don’t own a home then” but financial circumstances can change with a blink of an eye so they may have afforded insurances at one stage but not another.

Edited by -Emissary-, 21 September 2019 - 12:17 AM.


#60 MooGuru

Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:38 AM

View PostMollycoddle, on 20 September 2019 - 09:24 PM, said:



I worded it poorly, what I meant  was that you can get it shut down if you don't agree with them raising money for you.

It's been a few years but I don't think we were (easily) able to get the ones using our story shut down only the person who had put it on there could. Hence why the media relations team ended up doing following it up because they frequently dealt with these problems.

#61 born.a.girl

Posted 21 September 2019 - 07:55 AM

View Post-Emissary-, on 21 September 2019 - 12:11 AM, said:

I don’t get the frustration or angst. If you don’t agree with it then don’t donate. No one is being forced to donate to anything. Who cares what other people are trying to raise for and who cares if they get a donation or not.

I donate to ones I feel like supporting which is usually shared by my friends for certain things.

On the topic of insurances, I completely agree with car insurances as the risk of a car accident is quite high if you drive frequently.

However, I can understand why people may not have home or content insurances when their house is nowhere near a disaster prone area. The risk of your house burning may be there but it is significantly lower. People are allowed to weigh up the risk and make a choice whether they want to insure it or not.

If you’re struggling financially and weighing up whether to take the risk with no insurances vs feeding your family, I can see why someone would choose to feed their family first.

It is easy to say “don’t own a home then” but financial circumstances can change with a blink of an eye so they may have afforded insurances at one stage but not another.

The consequences are much, much higher, though.

If your car gets written off by someone and you only have extended third party, there's possibly public transport, you might have a bike, a friend might give you a lift.   Gazillions of people around the world live without a car.

Not too many live without a roof over their head.

I'm not talking about those who are in dire straits, but those who 'weigh up whether to take the risk'.  YOu can do what people couldn't do until relatively recently, and pay periodically.

It's something we should make provision for with (say) super (but we seem to be going the other way), and the government should step in and provide a scheme for those whose properties are now considered a flood/fire risk when they weren't when they bought.


ETA: And on super (I'm on my hobby horse now) I find it odd how difficult it is to access your super to keep your home. Obviously for 100 different cases there will be 100 different sets of circumstances.  Of course it's important to get to retirement age with some super, but I'd have thought it's just as important to get there with a roof over your head.  The difference in quality of life for those in retirement who own homes, and those who don't is staggering.   I'd advise anyone to prioritise paying the insurance over paying the mortgage.  You can dip into your super (eventually and after a nightmare time of it) for the mortgage, but not for the insurance.

Edited by born.a.girl, 21 September 2019 - 08:19 AM.


#62 Prancer is coming

Posted 21 September 2019 - 01:49 PM

I rarely donate to them.  Maybe if I know the person well.  I recently donated to the kid’s sports coach who had made a national team.  Happy to do stuff like that.  Not as keen to fund someone I don’t know jump the queue at the public hospital for grommets done privately or for a vet bill.  I just ignore requests.  We do donate to different charities and would rather donate to a bigger cause than just individuals who promote themselves or who have others promoting for them.

Interested, I did think about donating to Luke from Survivor, but did not bother as the tally was pretty high.  I really enjoyed the series, it cost me nothing to watch and he provided a lot of entertainment.  I think the GFM provided a bit of power to viewers in that they could not choose who won but they could choose who got the prize money.  And one of the reasons he was voted out was because he was seen most deserving of the money which would have given him an edge.

Edited by Prancer is coming, 21 September 2019 - 01:50 PM.


#63 -Emissary-

Posted 21 September 2019 - 02:22 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 21 September 2019 - 07:55 AM, said:



The consequences are much, much higher, though.

If your car gets written off by someone and you only have extended third party, there's possibly public transport, you might have a bike, a friend might give you a lift.   Gazillions of people around the world live without a car.

Not too many live without a roof over their head.

I'm not talking about those who are in dire straits, but those who 'weigh up whether to take the risk'.  YOu can do what people couldn't do until relatively recently, and pay periodically.

Of course, the consequences is much higher but it is still up to them to determine that risk.

If you have a mortgage then the bank usually make you take out building insurance before you take out a loan.

If you don’t have a mortgage then it is up to you. If you don’t have a mortgage then you can probably afford to remortgage to rebuild the home or sell the land and rent. Obviously, not the most ideal but that’s what people are weighing up when they take that risk.

In most cases the value of the property is in the land not the building.

Edited by -Emissary-, 21 September 2019 - 02:23 PM.


#64 babybug15

Posted 21 September 2019 - 02:31 PM

I don't- because I've seen too many that are ridiculous.

Such as:

A friend of DHs who raised for a vet bill for his cat. His cat that he lets roam all over town and who he refuses to keep inside who got hit by a car and refuses to insure. And the vet gave them a cheaper treatment option (not euthanasia), but they chose the most expensive and expected everyone to pay.

The same friend couldn't afford to go to a science-fiction convention one year. So people asked for donations to send him. Including flights from the other side of the country, accomodation at a fancy hotel as well as the ticket. They were just broke that year, not ill or unemployed or anything.

A friend who keeps posting a GFM for another friend of there's who seems to not pay their rent every month. Not just a once off when they are having a rough patch, but every month. Yes, life sucks but maybe if you can't pay rent for every month you need to reasses where you live and seek more long term assistance. If the sob story is true, I feel sorry for their landlord because it seems they face eviction for not paying rent frequently.

A friend of a friend who claims to "run an animal sanctuary". It seems that it's just her pets (she does no rehoming/release/advocacy etc) and she has taken in too many animals given her land size. Every few months there's a GFM because they are "down to their last $20 and need to buy hay or everyone will starve".

That being said, I donate regularly to charities, volunteer my time and will do things like donate to the local school or buy raffle tickets for the local fire service etc. I'll chip in to collections where there's a tangiable need in hardship (eg a friend's husband had cancer and a group pitched in for a cleaner for a year when he was having treatment). But if it's on GFM or something ridiculous I won't.

#65 casime

Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:23 PM

Quote

Of course, the consequences is much higher but it is still up to them to determine that risk.


But they are not taking on that risk themselves.  They are expecting that something either won't happen, or that friends and family (and even the general public) will chip in when things go wrong.

I don't have pet insurance, but I do have a separate bank account that I add into every pay check that is more than enough to pay for any veterinary attention my pets my need.  I could say 'stuff it' and spend several months in Europe on that money, but I don't, because by not having pet insurance, I accept that there may come a day when I will be facing a very expensive vet bill.  That is my risk, I can't just say 'donate to me, because Europe was more important than providing for my pets'.  On the flip side, I do not have enough funds to rebuild my house if it burns down, so I pay my house and contents insurance each month, however begrudgingly I watch those funds leave my bank account.  

If you choose to forgo insurance, then you have to accept that you could be facing a big bill, and not just think that you can post a GFM when things go wrong.  You're shifting the responsibility from yourself to others.

#66 K.heather

Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:26 PM

There is an insurance company called AAI insurance through good Shepherd mainly for Centrelink recipients.

I pay $11.48 a fortnight and have full comprehensive and they will pay up to $3000 if I need a new car.

First two claims are free no excess and windscreen replacement is $100

They also centrepay payments if you are on a pension.

#67 born.a.girl

Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:34 PM

View Postcasime, on 21 September 2019 - 03:23 PM, said:

But they are not taking on that risk themselves.  They are expecting that something either won't happen, or that friends and family (and even the general public) will chip in when things go wrong.

I don't have pet insurance, but I do have a separate bank account that I add into every pay check that is more than enough to pay for any veterinary attention my pets my need.  I could say 'stuff it' and spend several months in Europe on that money, but I don't, because by not having pet insurance, I accept that there may come a day when I will be facing a very expensive vet bill.  That is my risk, I can't just say 'donate to me, because Europe was more important than providing for my pets'.  On the flip side, I do not have enough funds to rebuild my house if it burns down, so I pay my house and contents insurance each month, however begrudgingly I watch those funds leave my bank account.  

If you choose to forgo insurance, then you have to accept that you could be facing a big bill, and not just think that you can post a GFM when things go wrong.  You're shifting the responsibility from yourself to others.


Yes, indeed.  I think Emissary was thinking about people who choose not to insure, and don't actually hold out their hand for funds if the unthinkable happens.  I guess we only hear about the ones who do. As per our example, the 'prioritising the children's education' sounds all well and good, until it's not actually buying them shoes and a uniform but a private school. Appearances and all that.


Interesting on the vet insurance bit.  We had our aged (but not ancient) cat to the vet at short notice today with his back half hardly able to be moved. Had a conversation with the vet, saying we deliberately didn't do insurance so that we weren't influenced by that in terms of treatment. We've got the money to pay if it's appropriate.

View PostK.heather, on 21 September 2019 - 03:26 PM, said:

There is an insurance company called AAI insurance through good Shepherd mainly for Centrelink recipients.

I pay $11.48 a fortnight and have full comprehensive and they will pay up to $3000 if I need a new car.

First two claims are free no excess and windscreen replacement is $100

They also centrepay payments if you are on a pension.

That's fantastic, is it only car insurance?

#68 -Emissary-

Posted 21 September 2019 - 04:21 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 21 September 2019 - 03:34 PM, said:

Yes, indeed.  I think Emissary was thinking about people who choose not to insure, and don't actually hold out their hand for funds if the unthinkable happens.  I guess we only hear about the ones who do. As per our example, the 'prioritising the children's education' sounds all well and good, until it's not actually buying them shoes and a uniform but a private school. Appearances and all that.

I am - if someone choose to not insure then I assume they will accept that they were be up for a huge financial bill once if something is to happen.

That goes for everything in life - people take risks all the time and how they choose to reduce the impact and consequences is up to them.

It just puzzle me when people claim if you don’t have insurances then don’t own a house. Those statements just seem so extreme to me.

Edited by -Emissary-, 21 September 2019 - 04:31 PM.


#69 K.heather

Posted 21 September 2019 - 04:23 PM

Have sent you a pm b.a.g :)

#70 -Emissary-

Posted 21 September 2019 - 04:29 PM

View Postcasime, on 21 September 2019 - 03:23 PM, said:



But they are not taking on that risk themselves.  They are expecting that something either won't happen, or that friends and family (and even the general public) will chip in when things go wrong.

I don't have pet insurance, but I do have a separate bank account that I add into every pay check that is more than enough to pay for any veterinary attention my pets my need.  I could say 'stuff it' and spend several months in Europe on that money, but I don't, because by not having pet insurance, I accept that there may come a day when I will be facing a very expensive vet bill.  That is my risk, I can't just say 'donate to me, because Europe was more important than providing for my pets'.  On the flip side, I do not have enough funds to rebuild my house if it burns down, so I pay my house and contents insurance each month, however begrudgingly I watch those funds leave my bank account.  

If you choose to forgo insurance, then you have to accept that you could be facing a big bill, and not just think that you can post a GFM when things go wrong.  You're shifting the responsibility from yourself to others.

And even if they are so what? People can try and shift the responsibility all they want but it is still up to other people to whether they deem worthy to contribute.

How does this affect you if you choose not to donate? You’re frustrated that they dare to have a GFM even though you are not in any way obligated to help?

See, I don’t get that. They’re putting their hands out for help and people are willing to help. I don’t see that as a problem. I am willing to help my friends and family in many situations and I don’t really get why it should cause anyone any angst especially if it doesn’t affect them.

You might argue that the funds might go to a better cause but that’s up to the individual who is donating to make that decision. They deemed it worthwhile to contribute, it is their money, we don’t have a say in what someone deem worthwhile.

And even if these GFM pages you deemed unworthy isn’t there, it doesn’t mean people will donate their money to the cause you deem worthy.

#71 kim27

Posted 21 September 2019 - 05:52 PM

View Post-Emissary-, on 21 September 2019 - 12:11 AM, said:

I don’t get the frustration or angst. If you don’t agree with it then don’t donate. No one is being forced to donate to anything. Who cares what other people are trying to raise for and who cares if they get a donation or not.

I donate to ones I feel like supporting which is usually shared by my friends for certain things.

On the topic of insurances, I completely agree with car insurances as the risk of a car accident is quite high if you drive frequently.

However, I can understand why people may not have home or content insurances when their house is nowhere near a disaster prone area. The risk of your house burning may be there but it is significantly lower. People are allowed to weigh up the risk and make a choice whether they want to insure it or not.

If you’re struggling financially and weighing up whether to take the risk with no insurances vs feeding your family, I can see why someone would choose to feed their family first.

It is easy to say “don’t own a home then” but financial circumstances can change with a blink of an eye so they may have afforded insurances at one stage but not another.

See I’d never be without home / contents insurance but currently have a car with only third party property.

House fires aren’t that likely but I see them in the news here every week so they’re not really rare either. There’s no way I could afford to rebuild my house if it burnt down and I couldn’t bring myself to make a ‘my house burnt down and I wasn’t insured’ Gofundme page.

#72 Chocolate Addict

Posted 21 September 2019 - 06:57 PM

Quote

House fires aren’t that likely but I see them in the news here every week so they’re not really rare either. There’s no way I could afford to rebuild my house if it burnt down and I couldn’t bring myself to make a ‘my house burnt down and I wasn’t insured’ Gofundme page

Yep, and you can buy a replacement car for a few thousand, you can't buy a new house for that price nor everything in it.

If I needed to trim the budget there would be many things to go before house/contents insurance.

#73 Navy Blue

Posted 21 September 2019 - 07:05 PM

I think that people make mistakes. It's ok for others to say 'so sad too bad' but equally it's ok to help out, particularly when it affects others in the recipient's circle eg children or the elderly in the case of a house burning down that's uninsured.

It's a choice to donate or not, and idk maybe some people would rather donate $50 to a go fund me for someone's wedding or holiday than spend that $50 going out for breakfast.

#74 MuffinQueen

Posted 21 September 2019 - 07:25 PM

I have donated in the past, but at the moment I don't think I'll be doing it again.  

Two of the donations were to people I knew through friends. One was a vet bill and the other was for a child diagnosed with diabetes.

After making the donations I found out that both parties could have raised the money themselves, but it was probably easier to just put their hands out and ask.  

Makes me a bit angry when you see one of the families posting photos of their new car and every time they go out for dinner on FB - when they couldn't raise $700 for their sons diabetes equipment.




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