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Go fund me pages


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#1 gracie1978

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:24 AM

I'm always willing to donate to people who have had unexpected bad luck or are the victims of crime.

I just get so frustrated when they're asking for an obscene amount because their 20k car or 500k house wasn't insured.

If you can't afford the insurance you need to get rid of the asset because the risk of keeping it is too high.

There is a case in my local community at moment and I just can't bring myself to contribute.

What do you do?

#2 FiveAus

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:33 AM

Not contribute.

And not feel guilty about it.

#3 TrixieBelden

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:47 AM

I’m sure you’re absolutely right.

I still contribute.  I wouldn’t if I couldn’t afford it - but if I can, I do. There have been terrible instances here of house fires, some of which have caused the death of family members, in which people have lost everything. I guess they should have been insured, yeah - but ‘I told you so’ leaves such a bad taste in my mouth. People make mistakes.

Don’t contribute if you don’t want to.

#4 born.a.girl

Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:27 AM

Before the days of go fund me we did have an extended family member (cousin that we saw infrequently) have their house burn down without insurance. Three kids in private schools, and apparently because they were 'prioritising the children's education' they couldn't afford the insurance.

We and a sibling at that stage of our lives couldn't have afforded the school fees for one, much less three, but were asked to contribute.    Not by them, I stress, by someone who was doing this on their behalf.

We gave $100 which was a hell of a lot of money for us back then (early 90s) as we were going backwards for a few years.

What can you do though?  One partner didn't even know the insurance hadn't been paid - one of those situations where one person made decisions because 'head of the family'.

#5 Soontobegran

Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:42 AM

I contribute according to the back story, I have not contributed to the reality star who did not win the 500K and I would not contribute to the couple who wanted an overseas wedding but could not afford it.

#6 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:46 AM

I had a 30K car written off recently through contaminated fuel. (confirmed through proper lab testing, not my fault in any way: not a misfuel, and I only used brand name service stations)  My insurance covered it, but many insurance companies don't. So in that instance the victim has to pursue a petrol company in court and the petrol companies have lots of ways to get out of it and often they do.

So there are instances where I do feel very sorry for the victims where there are insurance loopholes that weren't their fault.  If somebody had no insurance at all  I would be less sympathetic.

Even with insurance Im still many thousands out of pocket for something that wasn't my fault. Insurance excess, stamp duty, accessories, time off work, and time and petrol running around looking for a new car. But that's a vent for another day.

#7 MooGuru

Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:30 AM

I remember a years ago after some bush fires seeing an interview on tv with a person who had lost their home who we vaguely knew (friend of friend). Incredibly intelligent couple with very successful careers. They'd made the conscious decision to not insure despite living in a bush fire prone area, after weighing up costs vs benefits. But they'd miscalculated/regretted their calculations and decision when they lost the home.

A few days later the hat was being passed around. As a couple at that time their income was probably close to tenfold what my parents were earning - who were paying insurance.
I remember there being lengthy discussions about what would be the right thing to do re contributing.

#8 Chamomile

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:01 AM

The additional annoying point, is that if you look at your insurance invoice, it actually includes the government fire service levy to pay for the fire brigade (in NSW).
If everyone was insured (and adequately) there would be more people to pay the levy and the cost for everyone would be lower.
The un-insured get out of this levy too.

#9 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:08 AM

I think travel insurance should be compulsory with air tickets or any overseas travel.   It doesn't cost all that much, but the consequences - financially, emotionally etc - when you fall off a motor bike in Bali and end up with head injuries and no insurance to get you home..........

#10 Mollycoddle

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:15 AM

View PostRuf~Feral~es, on 19 September 2019 - 11:08 AM, said:

I think travel insurance should be compulsory with air tickets or any overseas travel.   It doesn't cost all that much, but the consequences - financially, emotionally etc - when you fall off a motor bike in Bali and end up with head injuries and no insurance to get you home..........

To be able to legally ride a motorbike in Bali and therefore be covered by most insurances you need to have a bike licence here in Australia and also an International Driver's Licence.  People still do it regardless and there are no restrictions put in place by those providing the service in Bali so I don't think you will ever stop this from happening.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 19 September 2019 - 11:33 AM.


#11 Ruf~Feral~es

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:29 AM

View PostMollycoddle, on 19 September 2019 - 11:15 AM, said:

To be able to legally ride a motorbike in Bali and therefore be covered by insurance you need to have a bike licence here in Australia and also an International Driver's Licence.  People still do it regardless and there are no restrictions put in place by those providing the service in Bali so I don't think you will ever stop this from happening.

No, you can't insure against idiocy.  But there are still many people injured overseas - not just riding bikes - who are uninsured, and then set up 'go fund me' pages to get themselves home.

#12 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:38 AM

View PostFiveAus, on 19 September 2019 - 08:33 AM, said:

Not contribute.

And not feel guilty about it.
this.

I rarely contribute to GFM pages for complete strangers.

However, I have contributed to GFM pages for people I know where through no fault of their own they have suffered huge hardship and are in desperate financial difficulties (ie. father of 4 was in ICU for 10 months, in hospital/rehab for another 18 months and went home in a wheelchair, house needed major modifications due to wheelchair - that family has lost all their savings, he's lost his business and they are so far behind the eight ball it's not funny).  But I also anonymously drop over woolworth gifts cards etc every so often as well.

#13 knottygirl

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:39 AM

I had contents insurance when I was a uni student renting a share house on youth allowance. It should be a priority but alot of people it is not.

I donate if someone has insurance but there is some loophole and the insurer doesn’t pay out - but not for someone who just chose not to get insurance.

#14 Luci

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:42 AM

I have never contributed to a Go Fund Me page, but I wouldn't rule it out. I would decide based on the individual circumstances of the request. I have seen a couple that were based on genuine unexpected hardship such as illness, which IME is pretty different from uninsured travelers etc.

#15 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:45 AM

View PostSoontobegran, on 19 September 2019 - 09:42 AM, said:

I contribute according to the back story, I have not contributed to the reality star who did not win the 500K and I would not contribute to the couple who wanted an overseas wedding but could not afford it.
I have been watching that GFM page for Luke, and he's doing better than if he had won Survivor! It's hit $550K so far .... My mind is blown!

I hope he donates some of that back to Cystic Fibrosis, but maybe that's just wishful thinking ....

#16 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:49 AM

Depends on the people. People can own their own home and genuinely not afford to insure it, but having a house is better than not having one. Like older people on a pension, they aren’t going to sell their $500k home that they have had since it was worth $40k, but they might not be able to afford the insurance premiums in a bushfire prime area either. Insurance’s have gone up a lot, probably a lot more than their income.

So it all depends. I can think of situations where you’re forced to keep an asset that you can’t afford to insure.

#17 born.a.girl

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:57 AM

View Post~LemonMyrtle~, on 19 September 2019 - 11:49 AM, said:

Depends on the people. People can own their own home and genuinely not afford to insure it, but having a house is better than not having one. Like older people on a pension, they aren’t going to sell their $500k home that they have had since it was worth $40k, but they might not be able to afford the insurance premiums in a bushfire prime area either. Insurance’s have gone up a lot, probably a lot more than their income.

So it all depends. I can think of situations where you’re forced to keep an asset that you can’t afford to insure.

Reverse mortgages.  

A lot of people I suspect just bury their head in the sand and hope for the best, your house burning down being quite a rarity. That said, I've known two people now that it's happened to.

A lot of it comes down to poor financial literacy, and an unwillingness to ask for help from someone to sort it out.

I'd bet my bottom dollar, too, that a lot of older people end up uninsured due to memory failures and confusion, meaning that they really couldn't say who they were with and when it was last paid.  By the time my mother's dementia was bad enough for someone to take over, she was either about to have the phone disconnected or paid it three times.  She would swear black and blue that she'd paid a bill and the mistake must be at their end.

Edited by born.a.girl, 19 September 2019 - 12:24 PM.


#18 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:03 PM

My mother no longer insures her car. She would be lucky to get $1000 for it (and that's being generous! It's 27 years old), but comprehensive insurance for it was costing her $479 a year. At her age (76) and on her income, that's too much. So I get why she stopped paying for comprehensive car insurance. It's a chance she's willing to take that it doesn't get written off somehow.

ETA: I am fairly certain she has 3rd party insurance for damage to someone else's car though. As well as the CTP for registration.

Edited by YodaTheWrinkledOne, 19 September 2019 - 01:45 PM.


#19 Soontobegran

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:10 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 19 September 2019 - 11:45 AM, said:

I have been watching that GFM page for Luke, and he's doing better than if he had won Survivor! It's hit $550K so far .... My mind is blown!

I hope he donates some of that back to Cystic Fibrosis, but maybe that's just wishful thinking ....

I hope the majority goes to CF....

#20 FiveAus

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:14 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 19 September 2019 - 12:03 PM, said:

My mother no longer insures her car. She would be lucky to get $1000 for it (and that's being generous! It's 27 years old), but comprehensive insurance for it was costing her $479 a year. At her age (76) and on her income, that's too much. So I get why she stopped paying for comprehensive car insurance. It's a chance she's willing to take that it doesn't get written off somehow.

And if she causes damage to someone elses car?

#21 born.a.girl

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:24 PM

View PostYodaTheWrinkledOne, on 19 September 2019 - 12:03 PM, said:

My mother no longer insures her car. She would be lucky to get $1000 for it (and that's being generous! It's 27 years old), but comprehensive insurance for it was costing her $479 a year. At her age (76) and on her income, that's too much. So I get why she stopped paying for comprehensive car insurance. It's a chance she's willing to take that it doesn't get written off somehow.

No comprehensive for a $1,000 car is perfectly sensible. You'd be better off putting the money into a savings account.

She still has third party, though, surely?

#22 Chamomile

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:32 PM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 19 September 2019 - 12:24 PM, said:


She still has third party, though, surely?

As my dad always says, “what if you hit a Ferrari?”

Just editing to add, that’s why you need third party insurance.

Edited by Chamomile, 19 September 2019 - 12:52 PM.


#23 Soontobegran

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:38 PM

View PostFiveAus, on 19 September 2019 - 12:14 PM, said:

And if she causes damage to someone elses car?

There is insurance that covers the other person's car but not your own....it is very much cheaper.I would imagine she has this.
My father has this type of insurance now, it's 'extended third party'. His car is worth less than $4k now so can not afford to nearly $2k it costs for a 94 year old to insure his care but he would never leave someone else in a predicament due to an accident.

Extended third party for him is $512.......quite a difference.

View PostChamomile, on 19 September 2019 - 12:32 PM, said:

As my dad always says, “what if you hit a Ferrari?”

It doesn't matter as long as you have insurance which covers the third party's car.

#24 FiveAus

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:44 PM

I'll support local fundraisers via work and will support friends and acquaintances in need, but not online.

Years ago I was FB friends with a girl who had a chronic health condition, something like CFS.
Her and her mother found out about a treatment in Hawaii and started an online fundraiser to get her there. The girl was an avid photographer and they were selling her prints for several hundred dollars, as well as asking for donations via something like GoFundMe.

In the meantime, the girl posted about her new DSLR camera. Then her new MacBook. Then her new iPhone. People started questioning these purchases when they felt the money should be going towards her treatment fund.

Her excuses were "my life is crap, I deserve these things to help me feel better". Her friends enabled her by agreeing with her and telling her to take no notice of those doubters.

Then she posted about a trip to Fiji she was taking with her mother. I questioned how they could go on that while they were fundraising. She said they had got the trip very cheap before they started fundraising and had no option but to take it.

Hmmmmm. I was very doubtful and unfriended her. And now I stay well away from online fundraisers.

#25 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:46 PM

I did hit a Ferrari.  Or a Porche?  One of them.




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