Jump to content

Is this legal?


  • Please log in to reply
57 replies to this topic

#26 AllyK81

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:54 AM

You need to then check with the relevant authority on the NT. As I say it is different in every state.

As a rule, people staying on site at the hotel (even minors) can be on the licensed premises any time.

They may even be able to consume liquor in the company of a responsible adult. BUT your DS would not be considered to be a responsible adult to facilitate that. And some states have offences against the individuals for breaches so you should check all that.

You should call the NT liquor commission

#27 magic_marker

Posted 17 September 2019 - 12:51 PM

I would fully check.
The last thing you want is for your DS to cop something for supplying alcohol to a minor if it's in the hotel room.

#28 Cherubs

Posted 17 September 2019 - 01:14 PM

I am in QLD, here we have a marked area around the bar and pokie room the minors can not legally cross. My 18yr DS goes to our local pub with his 17yo mates, they drink soft drink.  I think the rules differ State by State.

#29 JRA

Posted 17 September 2019 - 01:31 PM

For others, in Victoria the rules change last year.

An under 18 cannot go in to a bar without a parent/spouse. Where there is dining it is different

https://www.vcglr.vi...censed-premises

#30 doubting thomas

Posted 17 September 2019 - 02:43 PM

Damn, I have to admit I am a bit disappointed as I thought the NT was a wild free for all.
Seriously though OP, I'd be surprised if it isn't fine but don't know your laws.

#31 spr_maiden

Posted 17 September 2019 - 04:31 PM

I just looked up QLD laws and eating a meal means a minor is exempt from exclusion UNLESS it's after 5pm and the venue licence becomes a nightclub licence. Nightclub licence = minor always excluded from premises. So best bet is to call the venue.

Love it when I learn new stuff.

#32 Mumsyto2

Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:31 PM

I had an interesting experience recently and am still perplexed.

Took older teen to a licensed venue. A sort of venue that supposedly caters to families with fenced playground within it, has kids entertainer some weekends etc. On entrance they wanted to see teens ID, I said they were underage and were with me. I was meeting up with friends in the kids area where there would obviously be no issue for an underage child to be be with me as their parent. They then wanted to see ID to prove teen was underage? My mind is still boggling as if they were over 18yo then they just would have provided ID to show that and could have gone anywhere.

Also, we have been refused service of drinks (not at place I mentioned above) and at bottle shops when they have been there with us. So if anyone has a child and takes them into the bottle shop forget it! To top it off teen does not drink, never wants to drink, none of their friends (even those now over 18yo) drink but should parents try and get a drink for themselves it’s hit and miss.

#33 VigilantePaladin

Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:02 PM

DH used to woek in hotels, bars ans clubs.

It is legal as long as the 17yr olds do not approach the bar, do not go into gaming areas and the 18yr olds do nor buy them alcohol. It is that simple. There may be a requirement that all under 18s be off premises by a certain time but that can be pub/club dependent.

#34 **Tiger*Filly**

Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:34 PM

As per PPs I've been refused service in bottle shops when I've had one or more of my teens with me. I've learned to leave them in the car.
OTOH we reasonably regularly eat out for a pub meal, usually somewhere different each time to try somewhere new. My 19yo and 21 will often have an alcoholic drink with dinner. I have been surprised that they almost never get carded.
Not the same but similar... we've had issues at our local cinema where they are particularly strict about not letting teens into MA 15+ without a guardian. They were going to refuse entry to DS the other day because he's 17 and was with his 19yo sister rather than a parent. Fortunately I was there too, just lagging behind a bit. I was actually seeing a different movie with the 13yo but they didn't realize.  I think if they had he mightn't have been let in (this was for Deadpool 2 from memory).

Edited by **Tiger*Filly**, 17 September 2019 - 06:35 PM.


#35 JRA

Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:41 PM

View PostMurderBritches, on 17 September 2019 - 06:02 PM, said:

DH used to woek in hotels, bars ans clubs.

It is legal as long as the 17yr olds do not approach the bar, do not go into gaming areas and the 18yr olds do nor buy them alcohol. It is that simple. There may be a requirement that all under 18s be off premises by a certain time but that can be pub/club dependent.

Certainly not in Victoria with current laws.

#36 qak

Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:55 PM

Just be aware too that 'legal' doesn't mean the premises don't have a policy that still might disallow it; or there is a mis-interpretation on the night.

#37 everly

Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:58 PM

I was recently in line at Aldi. The woman in front of me told her son (looked about 15) to go and get a bottle of wine. When she got to the front of the queue, the Aldi woman refused to let her buy the alcohol. Because the boy had got it off the shelf, the Aldi woman said it looked like the mum was buying it for him.

#38 .Jerry.

Posted 17 September 2019 - 07:25 PM

You would be surprised how many adults go into a bottle shop with a teen, with the view to the alcohol being for the teen.
They try to claim at the checkout that the alcohol is for the adult, but it is obviously not.

Refusal of service is appropriate in these cases.  The attendant can be personally fined.  

That's why staff are often tough on serving adults with minors.

#39 Mumsyto2

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:09 PM

Hhhhhmmm, we’ve never asked a child to get a bottle off a shelf and bring it to us. We’ve never even asked a child (older teens) to carry our glass at home when we have had our hands full or what not. Never asked them to bring us a bottle of beer from fridge. Never given anyone cause to think any alcohol is for our kids (that don’t/won’t drink). Still penalised ourselves personally when we go out with them or buy alcohol. I understand not taking them into the bottle shop and can cope with that but having to have them wait outside of Aldi and not being able to help with the unloading of contents of a full weekly shop trolley and helping shoot the stuff back in after going through the register just so I’m able to buy one weekly bottle (which only I handle) seems unjustly harsh.

#40 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:09 PM

Some places here have lock-out times (10pm) for under 18's.

As for the buying alcohol for the teens, I was refused service in a bottle shop a few years back, because 15yr old DD was with me. She was on her phone the whole time we were in the store ... maybe they thought she was trying to look discrete or something. The bit that made me laugh was that it was a $30 bottle of wine that I was buying - not exactly your standard under-aged drinker's tipple, I should imagine. I could have understood it a bit more if it was a 6 pack of cruisers that I was buying.

#41 Wolf87

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:19 PM

View PostMumsyto2, on 17 September 2019 - 05:31 PM, said:

Also, we have been refused service of drinks (not at place I mentioned above) and at bottle shops when they have been there with us. So if anyone has a child and takes them into the bottle shop forget it! To top it off teen does not drink, never wants to drink, none of their friends (even those now over 18yo) drink but should parents try and get a drink for themselves it’s hit and miss.

What age do you think this kicks in? I’ve bought alcohol when with my 4 year old heaps of times at Aldi and bottle shops and never been questioned, is it just when they are teens?

#42 Toddlerandme

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:45 PM

In answer to the OP if it’s a bistro/beer garden place with live music I think it would be fine, but can’t hurt to check with the specific venue.

On the bottle shops refusing service to an adult shopping with kids, I would have only been 10 or 11 when I was with my grandma when she went to buy a small bottle of brandy for Christmas cooking and the guy at the counter was reluctant to sell it to her. Then he decided it was okay if I waited outside!

#43 Pearson

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:59 PM

Our local pub, the area the bsnd plays is 18+ only as it's a sportsbar the rest of the time.
Minors must be in the care of responsible adults when on licenced premise. The 2 18yo's are not considered responsible  adults in this sitiation.

#44 MrsLexiK

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:17 PM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 17 September 2019 - 09:11 AM, said:

It might be state specific or how the pub interprets the law. I was denied service at a bottle shop when I was 19 and had my 15 year old brother with me, they said they had to assume I was buying it for him. It was a $20 bottle of wine, fat chance it was for him!

I would contact the venue and ask, and maybe make back up plans.
Similar happened to me I was buying Christmas frog (as in gifts) for a bunch of adults who have expensive taste. Had my sister with me. They lost out big that day. We also came up with it when I was in a bottle-o with a step parent. From memory I had id. (And I was “old”) but my sister didn’t she either wasn’t 18 or she was 21 but she was with her guardian. I know laws have changed about supply etc however apparently a birth certificate and marriage certificate needed to be carried to prove parentage (is what the attendant said). Now this is different to a teen picking up and handling the liquor. When a teen is just present - make them stand outside would look suss, bring them in get refused service.

#45 ~J_F~

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:18 PM

View PostMrsLexiK, on 17 September 2019 - 09:17 PM, said:


Similar happened to me I was buying Christmas frog (as in gifts) for a bunch of adults who have expensive taste. Had my sister with me. They lost out big that day. We also came up with it when I was in a bottle-o with a step parent. From memory I had id. (And I was “old”) but my sister didn’t she either wasn’t 18 or she was 21 but she was with her guardian. I know laws have changed about supply etc however apparently a birth certificate and marriage certificate needed to be carried to prove parentage (is what the attendant said). Now this is different to a teen picking up and handling the liquor. When a teen is just present - make them stand outside would look suss, bring them in get refused service.

Christmas frog :rofl:

#46 SkeptiHandsOnMum

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:22 PM

View PostWolf87, on 17 September 2019 - 08:19 PM, said:

What age do you think this kicks in? I’ve bought alcohol when with my 4 year old heaps of times at Aldi and bottle shops and never been questioned, is it just when they are teens?
I guess at what ever age the person serving you decides that it might be reasonable for them to assume that you are potentially buying it for the minor.

#47 VigilantePaladin

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:31 PM

View PostJRA, on 17 September 2019 - 06:41 PM, said:



Certainly not in Victoria with current laws.
https://www.legalaid...derage-drinking
Funny...it pretty much says what I said.

#48 panda eyes

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:32 PM

View PostSkeptiHandsOnMum, on 17 September 2019 - 09:22 PM, said:


I guess at what ever age the person serving you decides that it might be reasonable for them to assume that you are potentially buying it for the minor.

It's generally when you're a fully fledged adult standing there with your 16 year old claiming that the alcopops you're purchasing are for you.

Sure, some adults probably do like Bacardi breezers and passionpop, but if you've been standing there discussing with your kid what flavours their friends like best, don't get aggro when the checkout chick refuses service.

I do not miss working in bottleshops.

#49 JRA

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:35 PM

Quote

It is legal as long as the 17yr olds do not approach the bar, do not go into gaming areas and the 18yr olds do nor buy them alcohol. It is that simple. There may be a requirement that all under 18s be off premises by a certain time but that can be pub/club dependent.
Above is what you said


Quote

If you are under 18 you can go to a pub or bar if you:
  • go with a responsible person, like your parents, grandparents or a guardian
  • are eating a meal
  • live or work or studying hospitality there.
This is what the document said. You cannot go in to a pub and simply not approach the bar. This changed in 2018.  

Edited by JRA, 17 September 2019 - 09:36 PM.


#50 Daisy Chain

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:50 PM

I work in a bottle shop. I see it every week, teenagers that come in with Mum or Dad, point out what they want or gets it out of the fridge and comes up to the counter and when you ask the teenager for ID, parent pops up with, "No it's mine".
Then crack it when you refuse the service of not only the kids drink, but the parents.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.