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Is this legal?


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#1 76 others

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:47 AM

So DS turns 18 next week and he's one of the oldest in his group. He wants to go out but there's really only one other guy he can go out with. I said I'd get a hotel room for them. DS said that his 2 best mates who are 17 are going to come and stay at the hotel.

So question, is it legal if the 4 of them (2 x 18, 2 x 17) go to a pub, eat a meal, listen to a band? The 17 year olds won't approach bar and won't be drinking alcohol.
Beer garden that kids can go to with an adult and our kids have gone there with us before.


#2 Oriental lily

Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:59 AM

I think it comes down to the responsible serving of alcohol laws . The 17 year olds will need to show ID just like the 18 years olds if they tried to purchase alcohol . Of course then they will be denied . If the 17 years old drink alcohol the 18 year olds have purchased and the liquor license holder knows this then it’s illegal .

#3 76 others

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:01 AM

View PostOriental lily, on 17 September 2019 - 08:59 AM, said:

I think it comes down to the responsible serving of alcohol laws . The 17 year olds will need to show ID just like the 18 years olds if they tried to purchase alcohol . Of course then they will be denied . If the 17 years old drink alcohol the 18 year olds have purchased and the liquor license holder knows this then it’s illegal .

No I know that. They won't be drinking or approaching the bar. The 18 year olds will be and will get them their non alcoholic drinks from the bar.

I think it's ok but DH thinks it's about being with a guardian, not just being with someone over 18 to be in there.

#4 Oriental lily

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:04 AM

How would they know ?

You don’t get asked ID to eat a meal at a pub . 4 young men going to eat at a pub will only be questioned if they approach the bar .

Edited by Oriental lily, 17 September 2019 - 09:05 AM.


#5 #notallcats

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:05 AM

I would call the pub.  Even if it's legal, they may not allow it.  I can't imagine they would, otherwise every 18 yr old would be getting their underage mate in and buying them drinks, which would be impossible for the pub to monitor.

#6 ~J_F~

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:06 AM

It’s fine. People do it all the time.

The law is about minors about minors being with adults, not guardians or parents. Over 18 = adult.

#7 seayork2002

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:07 AM

I think there has to be atleast one person over 18 so yes in this case ok, but even then I think I see signs in pubs that so 'no under 18s in certain areas' so if they are in the food seating I don't think there is any signs either way

As a side not what would a 17 year couple with a baby do? (sorry OT - just curious)

#8 Oriental lily

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:09 AM

I guess it really depends on what type of pub . A family set up is totally different to public drinking rooms later in the evening .

I am thinking a bistro type pub with a beer garden with band playing earlier in the evening .

Not a boozy night that leads in to the early hours of the morning .

#9 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:11 AM

It might be state specific or how the pub interprets the law. I was denied service at a bottle shop when I was 19 and had my 15 year old brother with me, they said they had to assume I was buying it for him. It was a $20 bottle of wine, fat chance it was for him!

I would contact the venue and ask, and maybe make back up plans.

#10 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:14 AM

if it’s a pub that has an unrestricted area - ie...people under the age of 18 can be there, then it’s perfectly fine. many pubs have a restricted area where you can’t  be if you’re under 18 - although, in some cases, you can even be there if you are in the company of a responsible adult - ie, anyone 18 yrs or over. we go to pubs all the time with kids, nieces, kids of friends...no one asks me if i’m their legal guardian, it’s evident i’m over 18 - so it’s fine.

eta - just read 22fruit’s post, yes i see...i guess it *is* possible he (the 18 yr old) may be refused alcohol...but they’ll still be allowed in there, the 18 yr old may need to stick to soft drink...

Edited by Lucrezia Borgia, 17 September 2019 - 09:16 AM.


#11 76 others

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:16 AM

Cheers, I'll call. Seems different interpretations. And yeah band, beer garden of an evening. Not a nightclub or anything.

#12 MrsP2014

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:25 AM

unless its a venue that is strictly over 18 like the casino it will be fine. I was taken to many pubs for family functions and even just for dinner and drinks with my parents and would have been 16/17 and had no dramas. as long as the 17yo don't attempt to purchase alcohol it will be fine.

#13 Cerridwen

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:30 AM

My 16 year old and his mates, aged from 16 to early 20's, go out for dinner to the pub every couple of weeks. They play pool, listen to music etc. They sometimes have to leave by a certain time if there is an 18+ event being held. The other pub in town where they go has a separate bistro and games area. They can stay until quite late as long as they are accompanied by a responsible person over 18. We are in Victoria.

#14 spr_maiden

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:05 AM

In a beer garden, where meals are served surely it'd be fine.

#15 hills mum bec

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:10 AM

My DS18 goes to pubs quite often with his GF who is 17yo and they have never had a problem.  DS will have a beer with his meal, GF will have soft drink.

#16 molinero

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:10 AM

I would definitely check OP, as I've been in a situation where I was younger (out for an 18th birthday dinner) at a pup restaurant, and management threw us out early because some were 17. Just because there were others there over the age of 18 apparently didn't matter. The ''over 18" person responsible for the 17 year olds also had to be a certain number of years older than them. Not just a few months or a couple of years older.

#17 Wot*A*Lot*Of_____

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:12 AM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 17 September 2019 - 09:11 AM, said:

It might be state specific or how the pub interprets the law. I was denied service at a bottle shop when I was 19 and had my 15 year old brother with me, they said they had to assume I was buying it for him. It was a $20 bottle of wine, fat chance it was for him!

I would contact the venue and ask, and maybe make back up plans.
Lol I went into a Liquorland store with DD who was then 14. I was buying a bottle of Knob Creek for DH for Christmas. I don’t drive and have no photo ID, so when the guy asked for identification I couldn’t give him any. He refused to sell it to me without ID, so they dipped out on a $90 sale.
I definitely looked every one of my 49 yrs back then, so didn’t think I would need it.

#18 seayork2002

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:14 AM

I went out with a group when I was a teenager and got in everywhere except Kinsella's (night club in The Rocks, Sydney) I was most annoyed at them- the fact I was 17 had nothing to do with it!

#19 AllyK81

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:22 AM

What state are you in? The laws are different in every state. I can answer for Victoria.

#20 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:28 AM

Think it varies by state. Im in SA, a lot of pubs that you eat at have signs that minors can be on the premise during times x - y o'clock and must be accompanied by an adult. So in your case if they left before y oclock it would be fine.

If the other kids parents are OK with it, maybe they could have a few glasses of wine back at the hotel or something like that.  Id be OK with that if I were heir parents given they are almost 18 anyway.

#21 WannabeMasterchef

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:32 AM

View PostWot*A*Lot*Of_____, on 17 September 2019 - 10:12 AM, said:

Lol I went into a Liquorland store with DD who was then 14. I was buying a bottle of Knob Creek for DH for Christmas. I don’t drive and have no photo ID, so when the guy asked for identification I couldn’t give him any. He refused to sell it to me without ID, so they dipped out on a $90 sale.
I definitely looked every one of my 49 yrs back then, so didn’t think I would need it.

LOL, my Husband was carded at the entry to a folk festival recently, he is in his 40s and clearly receding hairline to match! He wasn't even planning to drink..

#22 katpaws

Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:43 AM

I think you might find it hard with the accommodation. The venue (accom) will probably want to see some ID of the person booking.

#23 Mollycoddle

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:00 AM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 17 September 2019 - 09:11 AM, said:

It might be state specific or how the pub interprets the law.

This.  There is an Irish club that does karaoke in our city (Canberra), I've been a few times for work functions.  They serve meals and obviously alcohol.  I have seen families with primary school-aged kids there staying long into the night in the eating area/lounge where food is served and people are drinking, this is where the karaoke happens and kids sometime participate. I'm talking up to 11pm-midnight. I was surprised to see this, I was under the impression that by law all children had to leave licensed premises by 8pm at the latest (usually just before that time an announcement comes over the speaker advising of this).

Edited by Mollycoddle, 17 September 2019 - 11:01 AM.


#24 Mollycoddle

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:04 AM

View Postkatpaws, on 17 September 2019 - 10:43 AM, said:

I think you might find it hard with the accommodation. The venue (accom) will probably want to see some ID of the person booking.

No, it's allowed apparently, depending on the establishment, of course.  This was covered by EB in a thread not long ago about sporting teams going out of town, some EBers came in to say they have been able to book accommodation for their teenage kids on a regular basis with no issue.

Edited by Mollycoddle, 17 September 2019 - 11:06 AM.


#25 76 others

Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:23 AM

I'm in the NT

View Postkatpaws, on 17 September 2019 - 10:43 AM, said:

I think you might find it hard with the accommodation. The venue (accom) will probably want to see some ID of the person booking.

I will book in DS's name and he'll be 18.




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