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How much to spend for other kids birthday presents


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#51 Sweet.Pea

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:57 PM

I'm new to parties, but I do between $10 to $20 depending on what I buy. I don't base it on anything just my budget.

#52 Tinky Winky Woo

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:21 PM

$20 - $50 now the kids are older.  But it depends on what the birthday kid is into and if those things are on sale or full price at the time.

#53 Prancer is coming

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:38 PM

$15 for younger kids and about $20 for older ones.  Like others, I do a lot of shopping on sale.  I also spend more on family friends and relatives.

Personally, when my kids have parties, it is all about spending time and celebrating with friends.  I do not want a heap of expensive toys and presents at the end of it.  I would actually ask for no presents if my kids were okay with it, but they like presents!  But they do not need a heap of stuff, so no way do I want people spending $50.  With closer friends we spend more on, i tend to know them better so I can choose something they are into, or I will ask parents for what they need.

#54 lozoodle

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:44 PM

I spend $20-$30 and it depends solely on the friendship level. I don't consider anything else when making the decision.

I am also mindful of not going too over the top either as I know it can be a bit uncomfortable for the receiver.

#55 Jasperaliyana2729

Posted 09 September 2019 - 06:59 PM

My baby's are only in pre-school so haven't had many party's yet.
But I remember my mum used to have a bag full of different kind of gifts that she would often buy on sale and we would pick a gift out for whoever's party we were attending :)

#56 BeAwesome

Posted 09 September 2019 - 07:12 PM

Around $25 for under 8s.

I've found parties drop off at that age, and it's typically only a couple of good friend parties a year, so I spend more around $40 now.

#57 Lesley225

Posted 10 September 2019 - 05:55 AM

I don't mean to criticise but these amounts are a bit flabbergasting to me.  It certainly adds up over a year. What happens if just can't afford this?  

I suppose living in certain areas the norm would be different but i'd really feel for a poorer person in a middle class area.  What would you do?  Turn down invitations?

I remember my mother had a special tin she'd put away money for presents like this and perhaps it's just me not taking into account inflation.

#58 Drat

Posted 10 September 2019 - 07:17 AM

For me, I just love giving gifts, especially kids presents!

I don't care if my daughter gets no presents off friends for her birthday party, I certainly don't expect them. I know some people gave gifts of probably $10-15 and others $50+ but all were loved by her just the same.

I don't really think anyone throws partiess just for the presents.

#59 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:00 AM

View PostLesley225, on 10 September 2019 - 05:55 AM, said:

I don't mean to criticise but these amounts are a bit flabbergasting to me.  It certainly adds up over a year. What happens if just can't afford this?  

I suppose living in certain areas the norm would be different but i'd really feel for a poorer person in a middle class area.  What would you do?  Turn down invitations?

I remember my mother had a special tin she'd put away money for presents like this and perhaps it's just me not taking into account inflation.

It does add up! And my kids aren’t even doing the big school birthday parties yet! Just family alone and we average about $200-$300 a month on birthday and Christmas presents alone. That’s just family (so about $50 per gift)
Add in a dozen friends birthday parties, or god forbid, a wedding or two, and it’s a huge amount of money spent on gifts.

If you can’t afford it, no idea what you would do. If someone told me they couldn’t afford a gift, I’d tell them we don’t need one, or wrap one of my own for them so the child isn’t embarrassed. But it’s not that simple, cause no one wants to say “we can’t afford a present”. So I guess you just decline the invitation.

Edit: and I forgot about father’s day mother’s day and Easter. So definitely $300 a month on gifts.

Edited by ~LemonMyrtle~, 10 September 2019 - 09:02 AM.


#60 gracie1978

Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:25 AM

This thread has inspired me to message the close friends I usually do Christmas presents with and ask if we can just not do them this year.
Have asked my siblings the same thing, if we could skip Xmas presents and our December birthday presents.

Everyone agreed really quickly.  I'll just get something for my parents, partner and my 5yo.

#61 Beancat

Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:30 AM

$15 to $20 for whole class party or people I have never heard of

$30 to $40 for BFF

#62 Ivy Ivy

Posted 10 September 2019 - 09:51 AM

View PostLesley225, on 10 September 2019 - 05:55 AM, said:

I don't mean to criticise but these amounts are a bit flabbergasting to me.  It certainly adds up over a year. What happens if just can't afford this?  

I suppose living in certain areas the norm would be different but i'd really feel for a poorer person in a middle class area.  What would you do?  Turn down invitations?


Please don't turn down invitations.  My kids would get upset if friends didn't attend their party.
My kids wouldn't know if a child who had attended hadn't brought a present, and if I realised (and I may not, given the pile of presents and pile of kids and chaos and exhaustion by the end) I wouldn't care.  We've had presents with cards fallen off and not even known who they were from.  I'd be devastated to hear a child missed a party because of the present cost.

#63 Clementinerose

Posted 10 September 2019 - 12:15 PM

My kids have been given small gifts >$5 from friends and it is honestly not an issue. The giver loves handing over their gifts and the receiver is always thrilled with it. Some examples are slime, scrunchies, small plastic toys.
Lesley225 don’t turn down invites because of a gift. A homemade card and a packet of lollies is perfect for most kids

#64 laridae

Posted 10 September 2019 - 01:49 PM

View PostIvy Ivy, on 10 September 2019 - 09:51 AM, said:



Please don't turn down invitations.  My kids would get upset if friends didn't attend their party.
My kids wouldn't know if a child who had attended hadn't brought a present, and if I realised (and I may not, given the pile of presents and pile of kids and chaos and exhaustion by the end) I wouldn't care.  We've had presents with cards fallen off and not even known who they were from.  I'd be devastated to hear a child missed a party because of the present cost.

Exactly this. My kids have parties because they want to celebrate by doing something fun with their friends and have cake and yummy party food. Presents are very much an afterthought.  I mean, they like them and they like having them but I doubt they would care if they weren't there.

#65 littleboysmum

Posted 10 September 2019 - 03:31 PM

I usually spend $40-$50 per present. Slightly more if it’s a good friend. This is for primary school

#66 Heather11

Posted 10 September 2019 - 05:25 PM

The thing is you don't have to spend $50 on a present.  You can buy books for $10 or even less at Big W.  My middle child loved little lego sets.  When the Mixel lego sets came out they were $5 each.

#67 Jersey Caramel

Posted 10 September 2019 - 05:48 PM

I try to stick in the $10-$15 range for preschool to year 1/2 parties,  because they are usually whole class parties and there are a lot of them over the year. Once we get into upper primary,  $20-$30... Maybe a bit more for a specific,  thoughtful present that we know a close friend will love.

The only time I have spent more than that is when we've left it till the last minute and have to buy whatever we can find on 10 minutes...I hate that feeling,  so try to be organised to buy things on sale/ clearance.




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