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How much to spend for other kids birthday presents


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#1 Drat

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:18 AM

How much do you spend on birthday presents for other kids?

Do you spend a set amount (like $20) or does it depend on certain things?

Like:

- friendship level (if they are close friends vs acquaintances)
- location of the party (home vs venue)
- age of kid (do you spend more if they are primary vs toddler)
- how much the parents spent on your kid for their birthday

Or any other reasoning?

We had a conversation about this with friends recently and some surprising opinions came up, so i'm curious to what everyone else does.

#2 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:22 AM

general rule of thumb around $40 - $50.


#3 Sentient Puddle

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:30 AM

$30 -50, besties will spend a bit more.

#4 JK4

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:30 AM

For us it depends on closeness of friend/age. I spend less during the early years/whole class parties $20-30 (preferably something in this range on sale) and $30-$50 in high school as there are few parties (and this seems to be the going rate between the kids - gift vouchers are standard).
ETA - Location of Party doesn’t change the value of the gift for class parties but a one on one expensive activity for high schoolers would mean I spend more as a combination of best friends & what they are doing.

Edited by JK4, 08 September 2019 - 07:33 AM.


#5 Hands Up

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:30 AM

I spend $20-25 but often value is more as they are on sale. If both kids are invited I spend more.

Kids are 4 and 5.

Edited by Hands Up, 08 September 2019 - 07:31 AM.


#6 Mooples

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:34 AM

It depends on the kid for me. We have some friends’ kids we spend $10-$20 on and others we spend $100. My kids are little so we haven’t had any kinder/school parties yet but I’ll probably spend $20ish on those.

#7 EmmDasher

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:36 AM

We spend $15-30 depending on friendship and what’s on sale etc. I can see us spending a little more as the kids get older and there are fewer “everyone’s invited” parties. Location and reciprocity don’t impact it for me.

#8 countrychic29

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:45 AM

We are at the prep and kinder stage so for whole class parties we generally spend $15-20 including cards/wrapping etc
Class besties around $30
Close friends children around $50

I buy a variety of small presents when on sale so my girls can pick from the present pile for their friends

#9 eachschoolholidays

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:45 AM

I normally stock up when Smiggle, Lego etc have a big sale. I spend about $20 but RRP would be $30 or so

#10 BornToLove

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:50 AM

We have a range as well, usually $20 - $40.

We tend to spend less when DD isn’t close to the birthday child. However, party location/venue, age of kid, and value of what they spent on a gift for DD are not factors.

#11 Orangecake

Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:56 AM

Our 4 year old has been going to daycare class parties every week or two, it gets expensive and often I'm not sure of the kids interests. I've been trying to stick to $15 presents, buying gifts on sale.

For our grade 2 kid, the parties seem to have slowed down and less kids invited. I would spend around $25 on a gift but once again I try to buy on sale , so it's more likely $30-35 of value. We recently went to a party where one child gave a $50 note in a card and I was surprised by the amount.

Edited by Orangecake, 08 September 2019 - 07:58 AM.


#12 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:01 AM

$20.

#13 gracie1978

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:14 AM

$20-30 and try to get items on sale.
I also try to get consumable items or small things like Lego.

Would never buy a big soft toy.  Someone recently bought one for DS and it's very presence annoys me, will donate it with the tags still on.  He hasn't touched it once.

He recently had a fiver party and it was great not to have an extra heap of crap in the house.  He then got stuff he really wanted.  

As he and his friends get older I'd be happy to put $20 in a card.

I'd like to be more generous but we get invited to so many, that it becomes a significant expense.

#14 gracie1978

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:16 AM

View PostOrangecake, on 08 September 2019 - 07:56 AM, said:

Our 4 year old has been going to daycare class parties every week or two, it gets expensive and often I'm not sure of the kids interests. I've been trying to stick to $15 presents, buying gifts on sale.

For our grade 2 kid, the parties seem to have slowed down and less kids invited. I would spend around $25 on a gift but once again I try to buy on sale , so it's more likely $30-35 of value. We recently went to a party where one child gave a $50 note in a card and I was surprised by the amount.

Someone from daycare gave my 4yo $50 last year.
I may have pocketed it...

#15 Aughra

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:20 AM

I spend $20 for all parties.  

What do people think of gifts, cash or vouchers for primary school parties? I usually do a small gift or money in a card.

#16 EmmDasher

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:25 AM

I think a little bit of cash in a card is fun. I actually love the idea of a fiver party but I haven’t had the guts to do it. My preppie has been saving up her pocket money for one of those Garmin Kids watches and she’d love a bit of cash to boost her over the line. At that age presents are still exciting though and I wouldn’t want it to be all cash. My ideal would be craft supplies or something little/low value and $5.

#17 barrington

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:33 AM

$20 for primary school for whole class invite / all girls invite etc, $30 for closest friends, more for BFF.  

$30 for high school for friendship group, $50 for the closest friends.

#18 ekbaby

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:36 AM

$20 (sometimes less if things on sale)
Kids range from 4-11 years old
$50 for one present blows my mind !
We have high SES friends but even they don’t spend that much
Sometimes for the older kids and small parties of good friends, all the kids will go in together for one big present
Eg $20 each for something worth $100 like a Garmin watch
Have given gift cards before for the oldests friends  (rebel, Eb games, iTunes, even Kmart). $20 value.

#19 Drat

Posted 08 September 2019 - 08:59 AM

Another question

When you are counting value of presents, do you go on how much you spent or how much the present was worth.
(this was another point that two friends argued on lol)

For instance, I spent about $30 on a friends kids birthday presents, but the total value was actually around $100 as I got both items really reduced.

#20 amdirel

Posted 08 September 2019 - 09:25 AM

I spent about $15 preschool
$20 primary school
$30 high school

Cash/vouchers is my preference because it's easy!! Also as kids get older they love that grown up feeling of going shopping for whatever they want, so my kids prefer to receive cash too.

Drat- no one knows how much you paid; if you're a bargain shopper, then I'd count that as a win for you and just give what the RRP value is.

#21 Clementinerose

Posted 08 September 2019 - 09:39 AM

$15-$30 depending on age and friendship level. I take the kids to the shop and let them choose the gift for their friend. They love doing it

#22 EPZ

Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:09 AM

We usually spend $30 - Under 13 age group.

#23 EmmDasher

Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:14 AM

View PostDrat, on 08 September 2019 - 08:59 AM, said:

Another question

When you are counting value of presents, do you go on how much you spent or how much the present was worth.
(this was another point that two friends argued on lol)

For instance, I spent about $30 on a friends kids birthday presents, but the total value was actually around $100 as I got both items really reduced.

Always RRP. As PP said, no one knows what you spent. A gift with an RRP of $100 would make me incredibly uncomfortable unless it was from a very close family member.

#24 rosie28

Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:20 AM

RRP of $30-$40 usually, though I buy some on sale. I have one nephew and one niece so enjoy spoiling them and spend up to $200 on their birthdays. If I’m making something handmade (I’m a knitter and parents often request certain things) then they’ll get the handmade item and a small extra present.

#25 Ellie bean

Posted 08 September 2019 - 10:29 AM

Around $20 RRP for birthday parties of friends of our 6 and 7yo, I do buy stuff on sale and keep it in the cupboard to avoid having to shop every time. We spend more on nieces and nephews




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