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Knee Pain


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#1 Winging it Mum

Posted 18 July 2019 - 03:33 PM

Am after ideas of how to manage knee pain. To the point of limping and dreading walking up stairs.

Both knees have given me some grief this year but not to this extent. Normally I exercise, they're sore for a bit and then it stops and the cycle starts again. This is now pain that is constant when walking, climbing stairs hurts and being woken up in bed when turning because of the pain. Both knees have pain but one is definitely a lot worse than the other.

I know I need to lose weight (a substantial amount) and I'm supposed to keep exercising. But what else do you do to push through the pain? Do you just bear it?

I have seen my physio and she's given me some exercises to do to strengthen the muscles around my knee and am using Voltaren to rub into the knees each day.

So any advice or tips would be most welcome.

#2 MooGuru

Posted 18 July 2019 - 05:43 PM

I've got a current knee injury and a weak other knee and physio is my go to. Also a knee brace for stability really helped me as I was walking funny trying to protect my knee and then making it worse. But my knee feels like it's giving way I don't have pain as such.

#3 newbub2014

Posted 18 July 2019 - 06:34 PM

I’ve had really bad knee pain for the last 9 years and the muscles around my knees are shot because I avoid using them as much as I can. Stairs are the absolute worst. It’s unusual for me in that I am youngish (22 when it started) and wasn’t overweight, although I am currently about 8kgs overweight. I am not a medical professional and obviously it depends on what is wrong with them, but I don’t think you should push through the pain at all. What if it’s making it worse? Are there any exercises that don’t hurt them? I’ve recently started going to the gym but I only do things that don’t cause me pain eg spin bike if the resistance is not too high, or treadmill walking, or rowing machine). I also avoid stairs as much as I can. And with physio exercises, I only do the ones that don’t cause me pain. Can you walk on a flat surface for exercise? And focus on diet to help with the weight? They say it’s 80% diet anyway. Not suggesting that’s easy at all, but I’m just saying I really think you should avoid making it worse and the pain in the night etc is not good.

I would also look in to seeing a specialist and getting some scans done if you can. Mine are permanently like this, I’ve been told I need knee replacements but I’m far too young. So I just work around it and plan to do this for as long as I can by strengthening the muscle and losing weight, but not doing things that hurt them where I can help it (obviously can’t avoid things like going to the toilet, which hurts them a lot!)

#4 limakilo

Posted 18 July 2019 - 07:57 PM

I would get scans done to be sure.
I pushed through pain because I was overweight.
Turns out I had torn a ligament in my knee and also had "grit" behind my kneecap, and have a torn ligament in my hip along with bursitis and arthritis.
I had knee surgery a few years ago and am waiting on hip surgery now.
Also considering gastric sleeve surgery to control me weight and save my poor joints.

#5 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 18 July 2019 - 08:15 PM

Agree, go to your GP as well. If it’s osteoarthritis there are things you can do to help manage the pain, and they can keep an eye on you in case surgery is needed. Physio, hydrotherapy and physio-led pilates are all helpful for my knee pain. The most help however is wearing good shoes - for me that means skechers and frankie4s. I recently bought new shoes and I’ve had terrible pain after wearing them, it’s really shown me how important the right shoes are. (I have osteoarthritis from a traumatic knee injury, I know I will need it replaced when I’m older).

#6 Winging it Mum

Posted 20 July 2019 - 10:06 AM

Thanks all, I'll suss it out with my GP. My gut feel is that it's because of my weight but that doesn't mean I still haven't injured at least one of them.

Yes, stairs are the worst!

Diet is something I do have to try harder on to get some weight off. We have holidays in a couple of months & I'm dreading the walking around.

#7 born.a.girl

Posted 20 July 2019 - 10:57 AM

For you holiday, speak to your doctor about pain relief. Obviously what suits you will depend on all sorts of things.  I couldn't get out of bed without mine, yet I can walk for miles, with it.

#8 SFmummyto3

Posted 20 July 2019 - 12:37 PM

Awhile ago I watched an episode of Trust me I’m a Doctor and they featured a story on knee pain. They gave a group of people suffering from various types of knee pain a simple set of exercises to do each day for a number of weeks or months, and then evaluated the results. A great number of people had significant improvement in their movement and pain. Might be worth a try.

https://www.bbc.co.u...rammes/p048nnl7

#9 Chocolate Addict

Posted 20 July 2019 - 12:37 PM

It may not be weight related. My family all have dodgy knees.
I have arthritis in both knees so my knee caps often wiggle around out of place. I strap them when the pain is really bad, my physio has taught me how to do it.

I also have monthly myotherapy/massage mainly on the legs and lower back and that helps heaps.

I too, am overweight but while it doesn't help, it wasn't the cause.

#10 RynandStompy

Posted 20 July 2019 - 12:45 PM

My husband had a cyst under one kneecap in late teens. His other knee had a torn ligament and cyst in same place , 25 yrs later. He wasn't doing anything strenuous, it just tore over a week, cysted and he's fine now after surgery . 2mth wait of painkillers though..but part of that was him selecting surgeon and available dates.

#11 mandala

Posted 20 July 2019 - 02:48 PM

I have dodgy knees, and it took me literally ten years of pilates and physio exercises to un-learn all the bad habits and re-learn how to use my muscles to support my knees. It was also very easy to do the exercises incorrectly. It really was slow and steady to try and fix it. Now my knees are about the only part of me that doesn't hurt anymore!!

When they were really bad, I'd ice them at night and after exercise, and got checked out by the GP to make sure it was 'just' mechanical knee pain, and not arthritis or similar. I also spend a small fortune at the physio really carefully tweaking the exercises and getting feedback - if I do this, it hurts, is it hurting because it's working or hurting because I'm doing it wrong?

#12 #YKG

Posted 20 July 2019 - 10:40 PM

Hydro pools are great for joint pain, they usually have the pool sections for swimming and walking

#13 ~elle~

Posted 08 August 2019 - 02:36 PM

Get it checked out - I had pain for a few months eventually went to Doctor, had scans - bingo - torn knee cartilage - treatment with a sports physio and pain relief. So  much better now.

#14 Chicken Pie

Posted 08 August 2019 - 02:50 PM

I ended up having MRI's

have specific exercises or surgery, knee brace, orthotics

#15 JRA

Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:15 PM

I had my knee replaced last year, the other one is still stuffed.  I had 8 years before that on crutches.  I now know a lot more than I did 9 years ago.

If it is arthritis (ie no cartilage), cartilage needs exercise to keep lubricated, no matter how little you have. So yes, exercise helps in so many ways.  A pool is your friend, swim, do exercises, join aqua aerobics and all the different water type classes. Hyrdro therapy (wellness) pools are awesome. Our local one has a massive group that are there every day, it has become social as well as therapy. I now swim and then do my exercises pretty much every day at the pool


https://gladaustralia.com.au/  GLAD is brilliant. A program to help manage arthritis instead of going to surgery. I have done it with my second knee.

As I had stopped using my knees, rehab post knee replacement was a killer, my right leg had no muscles, so it made the rehab that much bigger.


Quote


I have dodgy knees, and it took me literally ten years of pilates and physio exercises to un-learn all the bad habits and re-learn how to use my muscles to support my knees. It was also very easy to do the exercises incorrectly. It really was slow and steady to try and fix it. Now my knees are about the only part of me that doesn't hurt anymore!!

When they were really bad, I'd ice them at night and after exercise, and got checked out by the GP to make sure it was 'just' mechanical knee pain, and not arthritis or similar. I also spend a small fortune at the physio really carefully tweaking the exercises and getting feedback - if I do this, it hurts, is it hurting because it's working or hurting because I'm doing it wrong?
Such good advice.

#16 2_little_boys

Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:24 PM

View PostJRA, on 08 August 2019 - 03:15 PM, said:

I had my knee replaced last year, the other one is still stuffed.  I had 8 years before that on crutches.  I now know a lot more than I did 9 years ago.

If it is arthritis (ie no cartilage), cartilage needs exercise to keep lubricated, no matter how little you have. So yes, exercise helps in so many ways.  A pool is your friend, swim, do exercises, join aqua aerobics and all the different water type classes. Hyrdro therapy (wellness) pools are awesome. Our local one has a massive group that are there every day, it has become social as well as therapy. I now swim and then do my exercises pretty much every day at the pool


https://gladaustralia.com.au/  GLAD is brilliant. A program to help manage arthritis instead of going to surgery. I have done it with my second knee.

As I had stopped using my knees, rehab post knee replacement was a killer, my right leg had no muscles, so it made the rehab that much bigger.



Such good advice.

GLAD is amazing!!!!  I was headed for surgery for both my knees.  They would literally just give out on me when I was walking.

I did the program around this time last year.  Most days I now have no pain at all.  Happily back at the gym.  Can squat and use stairs again.

#17 IamOzgirl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:24 PM

Ice is amazing for inflammation.

10min on, 10mins off every night.

Have you tried strapping? See if that eases anything.

#18 Pocket...

Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:58 PM

What specifically has your physio said the issue is? Has she checked out your other joints? I ask because  I had a recurring knee problem, an irritated meniscus, which was caused by having damaged tendons. The base cause was a stiff ankle which meant that that leg was compensating, putting the knee out of assignment and resulting in excess stress on the knee, upper leg muscles, hips, lower back and finally huge knots in my neck that compressed nerves and made my pinky fingers tingly. All of it had to be treated but now that my ankle is good the rest is no longer reoccurring. It took ten weeks of weekly physio.

And my physio recommended neurfen as the swelling was causing the pain.

Eta, things like swimming are almost always great but for some injuries they can be a big no no as they increase drag. For my knee I needed to avoid pools because it would make it more difficult to maintain correct alignment due to my weak muscles and risked undoing ask my progress.

Edited by Pocket..., 08 August 2019 - 04:03 PM.


#19 Coffeegirl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:18 PM

View Postnewbub2014, on 18 July 2019 - 06:34 PM, said:



Mine are permanently like this, I’ve been told I need knee replacements but I’m far too young.

The whole ‘you are too young thing’ is bullsh*t.    Yes, the earlier you start having replacements, then the more you will require over your life time,  but technology is coming along in leaps and bounds.

I put off having my knee replacement for 15 years as I was told I was ‘too young’.   Fifteen years ago a replacement would only last maybe 5-10 years.   Now they can last 15-20 if you go easy on them.

Don’t wait.  I hit the wall last year and begged my surgeon to do the replacement.  8 months on, and I’m kicking myself that I waited so long and in so much pain.  

I was 47 when I had mine done, and still considered ‘too young’.  If I waited until 60 (average age) I would have spent another 10+ years in pain and missing out on my life and family.

#20 LittleMissPink

Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:23 PM

The physio should be able to teach you how to strap them for excercise so that they dont hurt.

#21 newbub2014

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:12 PM

View PostCoffeegirl, on 08 August 2019 - 04:18 PM, said:



The whole ‘you are too young thing’ is bullsh*t.    Yes, the earlier you start having replacements, then the more you will require over your life time,  but technology is coming along in leaps and bounds.

I put off having my knee replacement for 15 years as I was told I was ‘too young’.   Fifteen years ago a replacement would only last maybe 5-10 years.   Now they can last 15-20 if you go easy on them.

Don’t wait.  I hit the wall last year and begged my surgeon to do the replacement.  8 months on, and I’m kicking myself that I waited so long and in so much pain.  

I was 47 when I had mine done, and still considered ‘too young’.  If I waited until 60 (average age) I would have spent another 10+ years in pain and missing out on my life and family.

Thanks coffee girl. I have to say I was given that advice in 2013 so good point that things will change. He did say though that they last 15-20 years and at my age he thought it might last about 8 years.  It’s just I’m only 31, and I don’t want to have to ‘go easy’ on it. Like although they are quite bad and certain things are an absolute no no, I can still go for walks, use the treadmill, rower, exercise bike etc without pain if I’m careful. So I’m keen to see how long I can hold off.

I also recently found a really really good physio so I’m hopeful that some good will come of that - I’ve been doing the exercises she set and also lost 1.2kg, so I think if I keep this up and lose my excess weight I’ll be ok for another few years (and technology will continue to improve).

#22 Soontobegran

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:30 PM

View PostCoffeegirl, on 08 August 2019 - 04:18 PM, said:

The whole ‘you are too young thing’ is bullsh*t. Yes, the earlier you start having replacements, then the more you will require over your life time,  but technology is coming along in leaps and bounds.

I put off having my knee replacement for 15 years as I was told I was ‘too young’.   Fifteen years ago a replacement would only last maybe 5-10 years.   Now they can last 15-20 if you go easy on them.

Don’t wait.  I hit the wall last year and begged my surgeon to do the replacement.  8 months on, and I’m kicking myself that I waited so long and in so much pain.  

I was 47 when I had mine done, and still considered ‘too young’.  If I waited until 60 (average age) I would have spent another 10+ years in pain and missing out on my life and family.

Agree.
I had done years being told I was too young so went to a couple more orthopaedic surgeons when I was about ready to shoot myself.
I had both my knees fully replaced within the next 3 months.
He said it was ridiculous to not allow people with end stage arthritis a better life even if it means 2 replacements in their lifetime.
He was more than happy that 'his knees' had a good 25 plus years in them.

#23 JRA

Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:41 PM

I have to agree, I waited too long for my replacement. I wasted so much of my life

#24 Coffeegirl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:27 PM

View Postnewbub2014, on 08 August 2019 - 08:12 PM, said:



Thanks coffee girl. I have to say I was given that advice in 2013 so good point that things will change. He did say though that they last 15-20 years and at my age he thought it might last about 8 years.  It’s just I’m only 31, and I don’t want to have to ‘go easy’ on it. Like although they are quite bad and certain things are an absolute no no, I can still go for walks, use the treadmill, rower, exercise bike etc without pain if I’m careful. So I’m keen to see how long I can hold off.

I also recently found a really really good physio so I’m hopeful that some good will come of that - I’ve been doing the exercises she set and also lost 1.2kg, so I think if I keep this up and lose my excess weight I’ll be ok for another few years (and technology will continue to improve).

By easy, my surgeon just meant no mogul skiing (like I used to do) and no running/jogging - basically no really hard impact.    Anything else was okay, including rowing, treadmills, walking and even gentle slope skiing.  

I was 30 when I was hit by a car and shattered my knee.  Had a number of surgeries including plates & arthroscopes.  My knee was really unstable after and I could tear the meniscus simply walking in a straight line too fast.   They should have done a replacement at the time of the accident, but went the less invasive route.   I went years with the pain being constant, and it was physically draining.  

Once I had the surgery the pain relief was pretty much instant.  Sure I had some residual pain from the surgery itself and the swelling after, but that constant pain was gone.

#25 Coffeegirl

Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:29 PM

Adding that one of my childhood friends lives in the US and had both her knees done in her early 30’s.     They don’t seem to have the ‘you’re too young’ attitude over there.




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