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broken knee - help


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#1 kookyred

Posted 15 July 2019 - 07:27 PM

Good evening all,

I have recently found myself with a broken knee and trying to work out how to get through the next few months.  

I live alone so need to work out how to do life generally.

I'm thinking cleaner, friends making food for the freezer, shower chair etc.

I also remember reading a thread about a EB'ers son being in a similar predicament and there were so many ideas on how he could cope alone - but i cant seem to find it.

So any helpful hacks or hints - please let me know.

#2 #YKG

Posted 15 July 2019 - 07:41 PM

If you can afford it, I’d probably go with a food delivery company like youfoodz or similar that do portioned meals that are still healthy but just heat in microwave.

Councils often can provide home help, but sure the requirement to access it but they help with general housework.

Supermarket delivery is probably easier as well for general food items. They bring in for you to the kitchen.

Are you on crutches?

#3 Manicmum

Posted 15 July 2019 - 07:56 PM

Shower chair, toilet chair, walking frame/crutches.
Cleaner, lawns, Woolies/coles online. Can you drive?
Extra pillows, hot pack, ice packs. Netflix.

#4 kookyred

Posted 15 July 2019 - 08:02 PM

thanks both - yes on crutches and relatively ok at getting around.

Not sure on driving - is that legal?  but i could if i needed to (its the non driving leg).

I will invest in frozen meals and supermarket delivery.  House is pretty accessible, just looking for those few things to make the next little while easier.

Will see if the council has anything that might help me.

Its a fine line between relying on friends and family and being an imposition.

#5 WTFancie shmancie

Posted 15 July 2019 - 08:07 PM

My mum had one of these:

http://www.ihcss.com...ray-Mobile.html

Excellent for transporting food/meals from kitchen to table/armchair.  Great for moving books, laptops, drinks whatever.

Because trays are recessed, it's easier to walk and tray can also be pulled closer when seated to eat from like a table.

It was so much more useful for her than we ever envisaged.

#6 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 16 July 2019 - 12:21 AM

One of these style mugs is excellent for when you are on crutches - you can make tea and carry it to the couch and drink in comfort. Also using a backpack to move stuff around the house (seems obvious but took me ages to figure it out). Also, do lots of physio.

https://www.kitchenw...3ml-Matte-Black

#7 JustBeige

Posted 16 July 2019 - 05:54 AM

Have you got forearm crutches OP or traditional ones? They forearm ones are a better investment imo. As you get better you can use a single like a cane if needed. They also allow you to stand upright.

Hope you are on the mend soon :)

#8 jojonbeanie

Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:01 AM

I found a wheeler/walker with a seat useful. I could use the basket part of it to carry items and always had a place to sit and scoot about from one area to another, like from one side of the kitchen to the other.

#9 #mocha

Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:20 AM

A office chair on wheels is great to get around in inside.

Council community help

Community transport for Drs appointment/ physio

Grocery delivery

#10 bubskitkat

Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:30 AM

I broke my knee about 8 years ago.

I found using a walking frame the best. Crutches were too hard. My son was in a pram and I used to push that around.

My sweetheart ex husband still got me to do all the housework and cooking.

Staying physical and doing physiology therapy really helped with the long term recovery but talk to your doctor about that.

I still drove even though I wasn’t meant to but I really had no choice.

Be careful that your ligaments don’t tighten up.

#11 born.a.girl

Posted 16 July 2019 - 07:46 AM

View PostJustBeige, on 16 July 2019 - 05:54 AM, said:

Have you got forearm crutches OP or traditional ones? They forearm ones are a better investment imo. As you get better you can use a single like a cane if needed. They also allow you to stand upright.

Hope you are on the mend soon Posted Image


When I sprained my ankle 25 years ago, I had to ditch the underarm ones as I was at risk of breaking my neck - I just resorted to hopping. Didn't live alone so that wasn't an issue.

When I had foot surgery a few years ago I thought we were wasting money hiring the elbow crutches, and OMG how EASY are they to use?  

I even used them for a bit up to a month after I needed because I found people kindly gave me a wider berth in crowded places (dreaded someone standing on my foot).

There's a hint for you OP - take your crutches with you in some circumstances, even once you don't need them, as you don't want someone to inadvertently bump you.

#12 Chaotic Pogo

Posted 16 July 2019 - 01:56 PM

Don't feel its an imposition to people in public to ask for help either. Just cheerfully ask 'Would you mind holding the door' or whatever and 'thanks so much'.

Most people are happy to feel good over something that takes them so little effort, you are doing them a favour!

I was on crutches for years. I wished I'd gotten over asking strangers for help from the beginning instead of right at the end.

Your GP should be able to sign you up for a temporary disability parking permit. You want to minimise the amount of drudging around car parks if you can.

Cook easy things that go in the oven (you dont have to stand there and stir it), with ready made packets of salad.

Definitely a shower chair, but also a shower rail. Even the 'suction' ones are pretty good if you pay say $30+. Just reattach them every week so they dont start to slip.

#13 born.a.girl

Posted 16 July 2019 - 02:01 PM

View PostChaotic Pogo, on 16 July 2019 - 01:56 PM, said:

Don't feel its an imposition to people in public to ask for help either. Just cheerfully ask 'Would you mind holding the door' or whatever and 'thanks so much'.

Most people are happy to feel good over something that takes them so little effort, you are doing them a favour!

I was on crutches for years. I wished I'd gotten over asking strangers for help from the beginning instead of right at the end.

Your GP should be able to sign you up for a temporary disability parking permit. You want to minimise the amount of drudging around car parks if you can.

Cook easy things that go in the oven (you dont have to stand there and stir it), with ready made packets of salad.

Definitely a shower chair, but also a shower rail. Even the 'suction' ones are pretty good if you pay say $30+. Just reattach them every week so they dont start to slip.


Years?  gosh.   I also found people really happy to help, and go out of their way for me, and give me space.  It's why I used them after I could walk properly - I didn't want to be constantly guarding my foot in a crowd - the crutches did it for me.

#14 kookyred

Posted 16 July 2019 - 03:56 PM

Thanks so much for all the handy replies.

I have sourced a shower chair, elbow crutches and will look into a rail also.

The council were really not very helpful 🙄. I'll shoot an email and chase them up, otherwise maybe I'll have to put it on airtasker for general cleaning and assistance for the next few weeks.

I've asked various family members to roster in to come by once a week and do my laundry,  I guess that's a benefit of a big family.

The office chair around the house is a great idea - will get someone to bring one over...then roll up all my rugs 😂

#15 born.a.girl

Posted 16 July 2019 - 04:09 PM

I hope you don't have any cats.  They tend to leave their tails in inconvenient spots for anything on wheels.  Mind you the noise of the chair would hopefully get them moving.

#16 Coffeegirl

Posted 16 July 2019 - 04:29 PM

How immobile is your leg?  Can you bend it, or weight bear?

I’ve had tonnes of surgeries on my knees and was 10 weeks straight leg and non-weight bearing.   I used one of those.  https://www.totalmob...arm-walker/
I. could even scoot to the local shop with it :rofl:

Shower chair and rail for the shower to steady yourself, and one of those suction cup bottomed rubber mats so you don’t slip

A meal service like another pp quoted would be easy.  Like Youfoodz or even Ubereats

Are you still in hospital?  Ask to speak to a social worker, they can often help with local services to assist you better than your council can.

You should be able to find a cleaner on your local area FB page.  

Ask your doctor if you are safe to drive.  I know mine would have let me if it had been my non-driving leg,  it actually getting in and out of the car might be difficult for you.

Edited by Coffeegirl, 16 July 2019 - 04:30 PM.


#17 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 16 July 2019 - 04:34 PM

I did a couple of years on and off crutches too - funnily the most eager to help (open doors/pick up stuff I dropped) were doddering old men. I felt like I should have been helping them!

With laundry, get a laundry trolley. I got one when I was pregnant with my second, I wish I’d had it forever. Push your washing basket wherever you want to go, and a good height for hanging out the washing. Certainly doable when you are down to one crutch, will be very helpful for when you are off crutches.

#18 BeachesBaby

Posted 16 July 2019 - 06:05 PM

I would recommend having a small backpack to carry things around, as a purse or small handbag is really inconvenient if using crutches. Also using refillable water bottles since you won’t be able to carry a glass for a while. Same for Tupperware containers that you can put food in, put it in your backpack, and carry across the room/street/wherever if you’re on crutches. I was on them for 6 months and it wasn’t fun, but you develop coping mechanisms. At home do stairs on your butt so you don’t risk tripping. Keep multiple copies of the same thing around the house so you won’t need to move too much to get them (waterbottles, chargers, glasses, etc).

#19 Chaotic Pogo

Posted 16 July 2019 - 09:07 PM

Backpack style handbag, and a lanyard round my neck for keys so I didn’t drop them!
All coming back to me!

Clothes with pockets.

Keep mobile phone actually on you as much as possible.

Spill proof coffee flask with a handle.

Ask someone to put your bins out for you.  That includes the neighbors you barely know, you are asking for ‘6 weeks’ not rest of life.

You will manage fine.

Edited by Chaotic Pogo, 16 July 2019 - 09:11 PM.


#20 Holidayromp

Posted 17 July 2019 - 11:11 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 16 July 2019 - 04:09 PM, said:

I hope you don't have any cats.  They tend to leave their tails in inconvenient spots for anything on wheels.  Mind you the noise of the chair would hopefully get them moving.


What is it about cats and their tails? Care factor appears to be zero especially around crawling babies and toddlers not to mention that twitching fur ruler dangling over a chair just begging for a tweak.




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