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Journalists getting their facts right when it can seriously affect someone's health


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#26 Nasty Poobah

Posted 13 July 2019 - 12:13 AM

It's the press council (for printed media complaints)

And before you completely rip the journo to shreds, please bear in mind that the gluten free bit might have been added during production. It's amazing what can appear in an article after a journo has submitted it. Ask me how I know :Posted Image:

Edited by Nasty Poobah, 13 July 2019 - 12:55 AM.


#27 Jane Jetson

Posted 13 July 2019 - 12:37 AM

View PostNasty Poobah, on 13 July 2019 - 12:13 AM, said:

It's amazing what can appear in an article after a journo has submitted it. Ask me how I know :Posted Image:

Ooooh yeah.

#28 born.a.girl

Posted 13 July 2019 - 07:13 AM

View Postseayork2002, on 12 July 2019 - 10:19 PM, said:

I am not a fan of the media and know it prints lies BUT no I would not take medical advice from an article, if a person does that I think they could have big problems.

Personal responsibility needs to come into play atleast  sometimes these days


DId you actually read FZM's comment?

It would appear they do have big problems, in that they disbelieve the OP, but it's the child who suffers.


Really?  Personal responsibility from a small child?

#29 Bam1

Posted 13 July 2019 - 08:13 AM

Clearly Seayork meant whoever is caring for the child. If a carer is only going by what they read, from what they just “know” or heard on the grapevine, ignoring the articles that do have their facts right, ignoring directions from the parents, ignoring labels on the actual food, than its time to reconsider whether that person should be caring for the child.

#30 born.a.girl

Posted 13 July 2019 - 08:17 AM

View PostBam1, on 13 July 2019 - 08:13 AM, said:

Clearly Seayork meant whoever is caring for the child. If a carer is only going by what they read, from what they just “know” or heard on the grapevine, ignoring the articles that do have their facts right, ignoring directions from the parents, ignoring labels on the actual food, than its time to reconsider whether that person should be caring for the child.


Fair enough, I read Seayork's comment as relating to the consequences for people in general, which might be true enough, if it's the person themselves being affected, but 'personal responsibility' usually means the person who doesn't take responsibility suffers the consequences.  That's not what happens if they're making those decisions for a child.

#31 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 13 July 2019 - 08:45 AM

View PostNasty Poobah, on 13 July 2019 - 12:13 AM, said:

It's the press council (for printed media complaints)

And before you completely rip the journo to shreds, please bear in mind that the gluten free bit might have been added during production. It's amazing what can appear in an article after a journo has submitted it. Ask me how I know :Posted Image:

yes! “that photo of x - whose identity is actually suppressed btw - that wasn’t in the article sent to legal”

um, no, the digital editor added it in - we just needed to add some interest and colour....

and don’t get me started on headlines that haven’t been legalled....

Edited by Lucrezia Borgia, 13 July 2019 - 08:46 AM.


#32 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 13 July 2019 - 09:02 AM

So has it been fixed?

#33 tarrie cat

Posted 13 July 2019 - 03:21 PM

Journos definitely don't write the headlines on their articles. It was one of the things that drove me mad during my short stint. The subbie would read the first paragraph of a lengthy article and come up with the headline from one sentence. Often the headlines had very little do with the actual article. Hated it! If I saw ones I really hated and caught them in time, I'd change them. Or I'd ask for them to do be changed - my subbie hated that.

Another one was a new, being-shown-the-ropes subbie removing entire paragraphs from an article which totally altered the context. The thing was the paragraphs were right at the start and they never should've been taken out. A good subbie knows this.

#34 Jane Jetson

Posted 13 July 2019 - 04:03 PM

Argh, Tarriecat, yes!

Most of the news organisations I've worked for have been small, and we sub each others' work, so there's been collaboration.

But not all. And bloody hell, sometimes you look at a headline someone else added, and think, "Well, I'm going to get told off for writing clickbait" or realise that they've taken all the qualifiers out of your story so it reads like anything that happens in a rat happens in a human, and ARGH.

#35 little lion

Posted 13 July 2019 - 06:51 PM

It’s one of the hardest parts of journalism: your every mistake is there for all to see. If it is print it remains forever. Time constraints mean we can’t always spend as much time fact checking and proofreading as we like.

#36 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 13 July 2019 - 09:57 PM

Again, is it fixed?

#37 FeralZombieMum

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:33 PM

View PostNot Escapin Xmas, on 13 July 2019 - 09:57 PM, said:

Again, is it fixed?

I don't know. I don't subscribe to the Herald Sun. The link in my first post still shows the words 'gluten free'. No one has updated the facebook post to say it's been fixed.

View PostNasty Poobah, on 13 July 2019 - 12:13 AM, said:

And before you completely rip the journo to shreds, please bear in mind that the gluten free bit might have been added during production. It's amazing what can appear in an article after a journo has submitted it. Ask me how I know :Posted Image:

That could be what happened I guess. What a stupid thing for someone to do.

View PostBam1, on 13 July 2019 - 08:13 AM, said:

Clearly Seayork meant whoever is caring for the child. If a carer is only going by what they read, from what they just “know” or heard on the grapevine, ignoring the articles that do have their facts right, ignoring directions from the parents, ignoring labels on the actual food, than its time to reconsider whether that person should be caring for the child.

Sometimes there is no choice to be able to reconsider whether the person should be caring for the child.

This had been an issue with some of my DD's teachers in the past - with thinking something was gluten free, and not understanding food labelling, and ignoring the medical file I filled out every year that clearly stated no food was to be given to her unless it was provided or approved by us.

We couldn't change schools (we would have had to sell and move house) and we couldn't ask for a different teacher part way through the year - though I did send the principal an email once towards the end of the year, stating my DD was never to have x teacher again.

A number of times teachers provided surprise food for the kids, with no prior warning or discussion with parents. A few times they thought the food was gluten free, but it wasn't.

It's really hard to ensure your child is kept safe from well meaning people, when there is misinformation out there.

#38 Melbs2010

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:58 PM

View PostFeralZombieMum, on 13 July 2019 - 10:33 PM, said:


A number of times teachers provided surprise food for the kids, with no prior warning or discussion with parents. A few times they thought the food was gluten free, but it wasn't.

This drives me nuts too.  One teacher who knew my son was coeliac (because I'd explained it to her) kept giving the class Allens snakes lollies.  He'd walk out of class at the end of the day and hand them to me because fortunately he listens when I've told him he can't eat random lollies he gets given.  It's so frustrating.  Have taken to sending in a bag of treats a couple of times a year and saying that if it has to be a food reward please just give one of these.

#39 JRA

Posted 14 July 2019 - 12:21 AM

Quote

Journos definitely don't write the headlines on their articles. It was one of the things that drove me mad during my short stint



Oh god yeah. I write an article each week for the paper and submit photos for them to choose from. The headline and photo matching I would expect be a fairly obvious thing. But no. It is embarrassing at times

#40 Bam1

Posted 14 July 2019 - 08:27 AM

View PostFeralZombieMum, on 13 July 2019 - 10:33 PM, said:



I don't know. I don't subscribe to the Herald Sun. The link in my first post still shows the words 'gluten free'. No one has updated the facebook post to say it's been fixed.



That could be what happened I guess. What a stupid thing for someone to do.



Sometimes there is no choice to be able to reconsider whether the person should be caring for the child.

This had been an issue with some of my DD's teachers in the past - with thinking something was gluten free, and not understanding food labelling, and ignoring the medical file I filled out every year that clearly stated no food was to be given to her unless it was provided or approved by us.

We couldn't change schools (we would have had to sell and move house) and we couldn't ask for a different teacher part way through the year - though I did send the principal an email once towards the end of the year, stating my DD was never to have x teacher again.

A number of times teachers provided surprise food for the kids, with no prior warning or discussion with parents. A few times they thought the food was gluten free, but it wasn't.

It's really hard to ensure your child is kept safe from well meaning people, when there is misinformation out there.

Oh I know how hard and how you can’t always pick the carers, I can’t leave my DS with his grandma and even last week his well intentioned teacher did something that was really WTF!!!. And don’t get me started on his soccer club who think it is more important to win than to protect him.

Its just all this putting the responsibility on the journalist rather than the people actually looking after the child, if the person looking after the child won’t take responsibility and provide a failsafe, you can’t expect the journalist to ensure safety either.

As others have said let the paper know, at least the online version will be correct and the journalist is not likely to make the same mistake again.  

The people in your life who are cavalier about your child’s health would still be a risk to your child even if the impossible can be done and all available information is made accurate.

#41 Froyo

Posted 14 July 2019 - 09:15 AM

Kind of a tangent, but it's also frustrating that so many news outlets publish woo based articles, or completely misrepresent quality studies by giving them a woo slant. It's click bait and completely irresponsible.

#42 123tree

Posted 14 July 2019 - 07:39 PM

View PostBam1, on 12 July 2019 - 07:43 PM, said:

Wouldn’t you check the packaging yourself though if gluten does make you sick?  I maybe would go there on the word of the journalist and then be annoyed that I couldn’t have the croissant.


Yes but mostly at things like afternoon teas or whatever everything is out of the packets and we have to rely on asking people what is in stuff. DS takes people’s word when they stuff is nut free.

Edited by 123tree, 14 July 2019 - 07:40 PM.


#43 kimasa

Posted 15 July 2019 - 08:02 AM

I think "watch everyone else eating" and "not believe people when they say things are safe" are skills you harden to over time.

I don't feel it's at all reasonable for a small child to have "personal responsibility" over their medical problems and the reality of life is that most kids will have carers, teachers, other kid's parents watching over them who might not always leave it be and not feed the child. Which is why these things need to be labelled and advertised correctly, and newspaper articles about a product are advertising.

#44 kimasa

Posted 15 July 2019 - 08:13 AM

View PostJane Jetson, on 12 July 2019 - 11:15 PM, said:


See, I'd hope a doctor would know this more than some poor generalist journo who caught a health story.

Try having a gastro illness with a low publicity profile. INCORRECT ADVICE EVERYWHERE! YOU'VE COME TO THIS WALK IN CLINIC FOR A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE FOR WORK BECAUSE YOU HAVE A RESPIRATORY VIRUS? LET'S DISCUSS THIS UNRELATED THING I'VE FOUND IN YOUR MEDICAL FILE, HAVE YOU TRIED PULSE PASTA?!?!?!?!

#45 byjingo

Posted 15 July 2019 - 09:12 AM

I think they’ve removed the Gluten Free. It now states; “They sound too good to be true, but these pastries are vegan, dairy-free, have no added sugar — and have even impressed French tourists. Here’s where to get them”

#46 Tinkle Splashes

Posted 15 July 2019 - 09:57 AM

I was annoyed for a similar reason by an article in the West Australian on Saturday regarding women taking anabolic steroids. Not one mention of adverse side effects such as hirsutism (irreversible), deepened voice (irreversible), male pattern baldness (irreversible), coarse skin, acne or cardiovascular effects (often irreversible). Just a picture of a woman with an amazing body working out, and reference to how she was a normal person with a highly paid job who wanted to get more out of her workouts. Dangerous reporting.

#47 Goldenash

Posted 15 July 2019 - 02:06 PM

Slightly different but probably arising as a result of lack of editors. I just bought one of those pretty over priced puzzle books. - Audrey daybook. I think I’ve completed three puzzles and I swear is a mistake in two of them. One was a word puzzle where they supply the words and there were insufficient words for the crossword!


Really annoying




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