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Chopped Onion


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#1 hills mum bec

Posted 26 June 2019 - 05:41 PM

Seems to be a lot of outrage about Coles selling chopped onion:

https://www.news.com...abafad921bcaad3

I get that it's not the best option from an environmental point of view but chopping onions really does suck.... a lot.

I've been buying bags of frozen chopped onion for at least 20 years so this isn't a new thing.  Maybe I really am lazy.

#2 smilinggirl

Posted 26 June 2019 - 05:46 PM

What a judgemental tone to that article. There are many reasons why someone would/could not chop an onion. If the author is too shortsighted to think about those reasons, perhaps they should just "let it go".

#3 Holidayromp

Posted 26 June 2019 - 05:48 PM

Who cares?

Buy your chopped onions and who cares how they come!!

:)

#4 eponee

Posted 26 June 2019 - 05:48 PM

The outrage is ridiculous.  I bet this person buys bread that's already sliced.

#5 WTFancie shmancie

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:04 PM

I love that there are prepared veges available for people to buy - especially those who have difficulty cutting rock hard veges.

My mum's arthritis in her hands wasn't too bad but she still had difficulty prepping and cutting root vegetables so I would do a few days worth at a time so she only needed to cook them.

#6 Lucrezia Borgia

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:05 PM

i just use a mini food processor thing to slice my onions at home. i wouldn’t buy pre chopped onions - more from a freshness perspective i guess. i do sometimes buy my bread pre sliced (bakers delight will do it for me, my french bakery won’t) if i had a bread slicer at home then i would buy whole loaves more often...


#7 MooGuru

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:11 PM

That writer should be thoroughly ashamed of themselves. To say:
"I can understand the temptation to purchase one of these pointless tubs, if you are perhaps a toddler who is unable to properly wield a knife without parental supervision."

In an article that goes on to quote people who have identified that people with a disability may not be able to chop an onion shows an incredible lack of empathy that can't even be written off as "I didn't think about that" - the writer considered people with a disability and still wrote a line like that.

What a perfect example of self absorbed self righteousness.

#8 chillipeppers

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:13 PM

I quite like the diced pumpkin in the article

#9 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:15 PM

Most of the time I can manage to chop an onion (pumpkin is too hard), but when my arthritis is flaring up this will be excellent. I find the frozen chopped onion ok for soups that I blend, but not so great for other things.

#10 ~LemonMyrtle~

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:17 PM

Um, weird. Frozen diced onion has existed for ages, at a cheaper price too. I buy it all the time. Lacks flavour though, for some reason, but I still use it. It’s a super time saver.

And dicing an onion can take a while, and adds to the dishes. And the writer has obviously never tried to cook even the simplest of spag Bol with screaming kids at their knees. People ARE that time poor that every minute counts.

Also, these diced/chopped/further processed items are a great way for farmers to actually be able to sell produce that may be slightly bruised etc. which reduces food waste.

What a tosser.

#11 *bucket*

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:41 PM

Chopped onion is a great idea, I'm all for it.

But what I really want is already peeled, whole small carrots. You can buy them by the bagful in the US, and I know my whole family would snack on them if they were there, waiting to be eaten. But the whole idea of doing it myself is distinctly unappealing (maybe that should be unapeeling!).

#12 rosie28

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:55 PM

Dicing an onion takes me 30 seconds, so for me this product isn’t a good idea, but I imagine there are people for whom it would be helpful - those with disabilities etc. I’ll save my outrage for the pointless packaging all over so many of their products!

#13 *melrose*

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:58 PM

 *bucket*, on 26 June 2019 - 06:41 PM, said:

Chopped onion is a great idea, I'm all for it.

But what I really want is already peeled, whole small carrots. You can buy them by the bagful in the US, and I know my whole family would snack on them if they were there, waiting to be eaten. But the whole idea of doing it myself is distinctly unappealing (maybe that should be unapeeling!).
Woolworths have then in small individual bags or a whole small bag there with the prepacked salads.

#14 Mollyksy

Posted 26 June 2019 - 07:12 PM

Isnt the woolies carrot battens? The PP means whole mini carrots. Though I did read somewhere they whittled ugly unsellable carrots to look like baby carrots lol!

#15 (feral)epg

Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:27 PM

 *bucket*, on 26 June 2019 - 06:41 PM, said:

Chopped onion is a great idea, I'm all for it.

But what I really want is already peeled, whole small carrots. You can buy them by the bagful in the US, and I know my whole family would snack on them if they were there, waiting to be eaten. But the whole idea of doing it myself is distinctly unappealing (maybe that should be unapeeling!).

You don't even HAVE to peel carrots.  The skin is thinner than that of an apple.  Try just giving them a rub and eating them - you might be surprised.

#16 (feral)epg

Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:38 PM

There are numerous small appliance - both electric and manual for chopping vegetables - surely for the portion of the population that genuinely can't chop their own veggies it would be cheaper (and better for the environment) to purchase one?

#17 Let-it-go

Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:39 PM

 *bucket*, on 26 June 2019 - 06:41 PM, said:


But what I really want is already peeled, whole small carrots. You can buy them by the bagful in the US, and I know my whole family would snack on them if they were there, waiting to be eaten. But the whole idea of doing it myself is distinctly unappealing (maybe that should be unapeeling!).

Buy the Woolies branded ones in the bag for $1.50, they are the small ones.  These are the only ones I don’t ever bother peeling.  They’re good carrots for snacking.

#18 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:58 PM

 (feral)epg, on 26 June 2019 - 08:38 PM, said:

There are numerous small appliance - both electric and manual for chopping vegetables - surely for the portion of the population that genuinely can't chop their own veggies it would be cheaper (and better for the environment) to purchase one?

I have a food processor, it either cuts the onion so fine that it becomes onion mush, or if you process it briefly it ends up wildly different sizes. I can use the slicer attachment, but that involves pushing down on the pushing down thingy. And you still have to peel it, chop off the ends and chop it into pieces that will fit in, you can’t just drop a whole onion in. Finally there is an extra item to clean - yes it goes in the dishwasher, but unless I’m doing other stuff it’s a bit of a waste.

When my arthritis is bad, I can’t do much chopping at all of anything , so I’ve got a good repertoire of dishes that involve very little to no chopping, this will give me a bit more variety.

For days when my hands are fine, but two small children mean I’ve almost totally run out of time, having pre-chopped onion would also be a huge help. I don’t like the extra packaging, but do like my family eating more vegetables. It’s not a perfect solution.

#19 CallMeFeral

Posted 26 June 2019 - 09:12 PM

That's brilliant!
The author is a judgemental dingbat.

#20 hills mum bec

Posted 26 June 2019 - 09:12 PM

 (feral)epg, on 26 June 2019 - 08:27 PM, said:



You don't even HAVE to peel carrots.  The skin is thinner than that of an apple.  Try just giving them a rub and eating them - you might be surprised.

My kids eat carrots straight out of the bag.  Caught up with a friend after school once at an outdoor cafe.  Our kids were all playing together nearby when her DH rocked up to join us with a bag of carrots that he had bought from the supermarket for their horse.  After the kids had finished their whole carrot snacking he had to go and buy another bag for the horse.

#21 PrincessPeach

Posted 26 June 2019 - 09:18 PM

 (feral)epg, on 26 June 2019 - 08:38 PM, said:

There are numerous small appliance - both electric and manual for chopping vegetables - surely for the portion of the population that genuinely can't chop their own veggies it would be cheaper (and better for the environment) to purchase one?

It's not just chopping, it's the dexterity to peel the vegetable first which is also often a problem.

#22 BornToLove

Posted 26 June 2019 - 09:33 PM

I use have a mandolin that can chop and dice, but it’s no good if you don’t have the dexterity and strength to peel and prep the onion.

Maybe this is when onion powder can be used 🤭

#23 Oriental lily

Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:02 PM

Weird .

You can buy pre prepared veggies of nearly all kind now .

Why use your energy to whinge about onions ?


Shredded carrot ? Tick!
Florets of broccoli and cauliflower ? Tick!
Peeled and chopped pumpkin ? Tick .

Prepared coleslaw mix ? Tick

I have used frozen onion in cooking for years .

I am very very sensitive to onion fumes .

Eyes stream and I end up with a rotten head ache .

DHknows not to expect sliced onion on burgers ( frozen in useless for BBQ) unless he prepares them himself .

This is a great idea ! Nice fresh easy way to get fresh onions in the pan .

Sure the packaging is bad but add that to a long list of other things that the supermarkets need to improve .

Biodegradable packaging exist and the quicker supermarkets are forced to use it the better .

#24 MessyJ

Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:59 PM

 *bucket*, on 26 June 2019 - 06:41 PM, said:

Chopped onion is a great idea, I'm all for it.

But what I really want is already peeled, whole small carrots. You can buy them by the bagful in the US, and I know my whole family would snack on them if they were there, waiting to be eaten. But the whole idea of doing it myself is distinctly unappealing (maybe that should be unapeeling!).

Yes!! I loved those little mini finger-sized carrots when we were in the US - something I wish we had here as well!!

#25 Fillyjonk

Posted 26 June 2019 - 11:24 PM

I saw a lady sitting in the passenger seat of a car today with the door open, chomping on a half a purple onion in one hand and a hunk of bread in the other hand.

(I am living overseas, and I see things that are unusual to me like this quite regularly. I try to keep an open mind and not comment on it all the time...

HOWEVER, this seems like a prime place to say:

If she had prechopped onions and sliced bread she could have had a sandwich!




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