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Junior position...is it worth applying?


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41 replies to this topic

#1 Lunafreya

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:43 AM

So I’m looking for work now and a vacancy came up for a Junior Office Assistant in a Barrister’s Office. They say it suits school leaves, I’m not that but I do have experience in admin.

Is it worth applying for? If you were advertising the position, would you knock back a 35 year old?

Just curious. The job sounds interesting.

#2 SeaPrincess

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:49 AM

It depends if they’re wanting to pay junior pay rates vs adult pay rates, or whether they want someone with minimal experience so they can do train them their way. I’d ring and ask them.

#3 seayork2002

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:51 AM

View PostSeaPrincess, on 18 June 2019 - 09:49 AM, said:

It depends if they’re wanting to pay junior pay rates vs adult pay rates, or whether they want someone with minimal experience so they can do train them their way. I’d ring and ask them.

This, to me the word 'junior' means not much pay - so yes call and ask

#4 Lunafreya

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:52 AM

They want a “school leaver”, so that says to me at least over 18.

#5 hills mum bec

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:56 AM

It can't hurt to apply but I'm not sure you will get anywhere.  We advertise junior positions at our work.  It's more about giving somebody the opportunity to gain experience in our industry at an entry level.  We pay adult rates but at the entry level award rate.  When I advertise we get all kinds of appliactions and whenever I have spoken to an applicant that has experience in the field they are shocked at how low the pay is and say they have the experience to be paid better.  The thing is we aren't looking for somebody with experience, we want to help somebody get that experience and once they have been working with us for 12 months their salary will raise accordingly.

#6 Renovators delight

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:57 AM

Junior rates of pay apply up to age 21. I would expect they are wanting to pay reduced pay from adult wages based on using junior. No harm in asking before you apply.

#7 born.a.girl

Posted 18 June 2019 - 09:58 AM

The legal age to leave school is under 18, so it might be worth clarifying what it is that they're looking for.   If they're looking for a person young enough to be able to pay lower wages, that's different from just being prepared to pay the adult award and assume no experience.


If it was the latter, and I was employing, I'd jump at the chance of someone older with more life experience.

#8 IamtheMumma

Posted 18 June 2019 - 10:02 AM

I'm guessing they're wanting someone young to pay lower rates too. You can ring but I suspect they'll fob you off by saying apply (can't discriminate) and then ignore your application.

Edited by IamtheMumma, 18 June 2019 - 11:16 AM.


#9 Lunafreya

Posted 18 June 2019 - 10:13 AM

Ok gave them a call, had the impression my application would be ignored.

Oh well, it sounded an interesting place to work at a criminal law firm :(

#10 JomoMum

Posted 18 June 2019 - 10:50 AM

Did you speak to the hiring manager? Or just a receptionist?

Does it actually say Junior? It’s illegal to advertise based on age.

I imagine what they meant is entry level ..

#11 chillipeppers

Posted 18 June 2019 - 10:53 AM

Junior normally means under 21. They advertise as junior position because they want to pay less. Your award wage would be more than they are looking to pay.

#12 CallMeFeral

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:16 AM

You have nothing to lose by applying in an interesting job (except maybe half an hour or an hour of application time). Worst case scenario they say no (and you're where you are now), or you say no because the pay is to low (and you're where you are now).

So apply.

I've started making a point of applying for jobs that I want even if they are out of my reach. You gotta be in it to win it. I just put less work into the application so I'm not wasting that much time. Which possibly contributes to why I haven't gotten any of the jobs :p  But at least I know it wasn't because I cut myself off at the pass.

Edited by CallMeFeral, 18 June 2019 - 11:17 AM.


#13 born.a.girl

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:27 AM

View PostJomoMum, on 18 June 2019 - 10:50 AM, said:

Did you speak to the hiring manager? Or just a receptionist?

Does it actually say Junior? It’s illegal to advertise based on age.

I imagine what they meant is entry level ..


Are you sure that also applies to Juniors?

I can understand it being illegal to advertise saying they (eg) didn't want anyone under 30 or over 50, but wage rates are so different for juniors that I thought it would be permitted to indicate they wanted one.

Just googled, and had a gazillion matches, and I'd have thought the major hiring companies wouldn't get it so wrong.

#14 IamOzgirl

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:30 AM

We have a very junior role at my work. Which suits school leavers. It is very very boring, and no one stays in the role long.

It depends what they need/want. They may worry that you will leave quicker than a real junior. But the role might also be perfect for you and you can convince them that you just want the job and are in it for the long haul.

It's worth a phone call.

#15 Oriental lily

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:42 AM

Out of curiosity is it legal to sack someone once they reach a higher pay bracket for no other reason than they are no longer a junior ?

#16 JomoMum

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:49 AM

View Postborn.a.girl, on 18 June 2019 - 11:27 AM, said:




Are you sure that also applies to Juniors?

I can understand it being illegal to advertise saying they (eg) didn't want anyone under 30 or over 50, but wage rates are so different for juniors that I thought it would be permitted to indicate they wanted one.

Just googled, and had a gazillion matches, and I'd have thought the major hiring companies wouldn't get it so wrong.

Yes. You can may hire and pay based on skills and experience etc, which yes are generally less overall in a younger person, but you cannot specifically say you want someone of a particular age.

The term Junior may not be discriminate here, so long as they don’t exclude the OP based on the fact she is not a school leaver age wise.

#17 Lunafreya

Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:51 AM

View PostJomoMum, on 18 June 2019 - 10:50 AM, said:

Did you speak to the hiring manager? Or just a receptionist?

Does it actually say Junior? It’s illegal to advertise based on age.

I imagine what they meant is entry level ..
I spoke to the hiring manager

#18 Cimbom

Posted 18 June 2019 - 12:02 PM

View PostOriental lily, on 18 June 2019 - 11:42 AM, said:

Out of curiosity is it legal to sack someone once they reach a higher pay bracket for no other reason than they are no longer a junior ?
If it's a casual role many places will give you less shifts or even stop giving them altogether. You couldn't do this for a permanent employee though

#19 Renovators delight

Posted 18 June 2019 - 01:48 PM

It is legal to advertise for junior jobs to be paid at junior rates:

http://www.antidiscr...s/adb1_age.aspx

Quote

There are some exceptions to the general rule that all jobs must be open to people of all ages. It is OK for an employer to do the following:

advertise for and employ a 'junior' and pay them at junior rates, as long as they are under the age of 21;


#20 EsmeLennox

Posted 18 June 2019 - 01:57 PM

View PostLunafreya, on 18 June 2019 - 09:52 AM, said:

They want a “school leaver”, so that says to me at least over 18.

Junior rates apply until 21 (or they used to).

#21 born.a.girl

Posted 18 June 2019 - 01:59 PM

View PostEsmeLennox, on 18 June 2019 - 01:57 PM, said:

Junior rates apply until 21 (or they used to).


Depends on the award.  Even back in the late sixties in Vic cleaning awards had adult at 18.  I was an 18you clerk getting not just junior, but female junior rates in the office job.  The two hour cleaning job I took on for two hours, six days a week, paid me more than the day job.

Same many years later, mid eighties, award for the majority of our staff meant adult at 18.

#22 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 18 June 2019 - 02:25 PM

It’s probably less about the rate and more about the work.  It’s probably lots of delivering trolleys, fetching lunch and dry cleaning, loading the dishwasher etc.  

I know one barrister who sends the junior out to get him an apple from the barrow every afternoon.  

People feel uncomfortable asking someone their own age to do stuff like that.

#23 IamtheMumma

Posted 18 June 2019 - 04:11 PM

View PostOriental lily, on 18 June 2019 - 11:42 AM, said:

Out of curiosity is it legal to sack someone once they reach a higher pay bracket for no other reason than they are no longer a junior ?

No but you'll find yourself being dropped off the roster unless you're a permanent staff member. Then they might ask to reduce your workload to a couple of shifts a fortnight.

#24 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 18 June 2019 - 05:45 PM

What were you doing before OP? And/or what are your skills/interests? Maybe one of us can suggest another role that might be interesting but not requiring a 'junior'?

#25 Froyo

Posted 18 June 2019 - 08:07 PM

View Postchillipeppers, on 18 June 2019 - 10:53 AM, said:

Junior normally means under 21. They advertise as junior position because they want to pay less. Your award wage would be more than they are looking to pay.
Yep, this.




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