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Admission to private schools


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#1 **CT**

Posted 17 April 2019 - 07:45 PM

I have put my son (18 months) down at a few private school wait lists recently. What are his chances of getting in some of the top tier schools like Geelong Grammar, Caulfield, Wesley etc?

I have put him down for Prep for the year 2023. I am considering putting him down for ELC if that gives him a better chance of getting in.

Anyone here who has gone through this process give us an idea what his chances are and what else we can do to improve his chances?

Thanks!

#2 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 17 April 2019 - 07:51 PM

The earlier the proposed start date, the higher the likelihood.

Actual progress depends on the size of the waitlist for the particular year.

Difficult to be any more definitive than that, sorry!

#3 Appleaday

Posted 17 April 2019 - 07:56 PM

Have you telephoned the schools and asked them directly?

I think that would be the only way to tell.

#4 Goldenash

Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:02 PM

Agree with pp - Call them -

I don’t know about those three but I know about a couple others in Melbourne and at 18months with a boy and not presuming you or your husband are not old girls/boys I suspect you may be struggling. I have found most school s pretty open about saying you have no hope if you really have no hope. I understand elc makes it more likely you will get a spot in a lot of schools.

#5 tenar

Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:07 PM

Don't panic :)   There are lots of great schools in Melbourne: government and independent.

You need to ask the schools individually, though, as to whether they can give you more information.  It will be different for different years at different schools, but for that far out I'd guess they won't know themselves yet.  If each family puts their kid down at 2 schools but only accepts one place, that suggests that the waitlists will halve by the time families start to decide which school they really want.

If he doesn't get in to the school you want (you'll have more of an idea what will suit him and your family once he's older and you have been to visit the schools and get an idea of the feel of them), you may like to consider enrolling him into your local primary school, which is likely to be great if you are in inner melbourne, but being open to moving him should a place come up in a later year: grade 3 for example.   There will always be some kids leaving the school in a given year, for whatever reasons, and their places becoming available.

#6 MuffinQueen

Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:20 PM

I'm not sure if it's different here in WA compared to over east, but our 'elite' schools tend to have openings quite often from what I can see.

There are always children coming and going (between intake years as well).  So even if you don't get in straight away, there may be an option to go on a waiting list.

Good luck x

#7 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 17 April 2019 - 08:49 PM

My experience is earlier on the list the better. Earlier the entry the easier. Having some sort of connection to the school helps too.

In terms of getting intake in non intake years, even trying to get a sibling in earlier took phoning school registrar every 4-6wks to see if a spot had opened and we only were notified of a spot opening up in the December (to start the following year). We were lucky and I know many siblings who have tried for similar and were not successful.

Like PP have said call and have a chat to the registrars. To get my sons in it was a combination of early application, discovering connections to school and repeated calls (trying to balance showing interest and being branded serial pest).

#8 Meepy

Posted 17 April 2019 - 10:04 PM

Wesley is one of the easier private schools to get into later on. I know numerous parents that didn't have their child on a waiting list at all who transferred over when their previous school didn't work out.

#9 Chaotic Pogo

Posted 18 April 2019 - 09:51 PM

You wouldn’t get a boy into Carey Kew at that age, even if you listed ELC, but a girl might. The cut off one year for those with no connection to the school (siblings etc) wound up being  14 days old. Ask me how I know.  Carry Donvale is easier but I don’t know agewise.

Not likely at Scotch either I would think.  

Caulfield and Trinity I think you would get in for ELC but better to apply now and keep phoning. ELC is often a bigger intake than Prep and many schools then guarantee a prep place (not all of them!). Eg Prep intake for boys at Carey was 2 boys 2 girls plus ELC kids.

Considering the fees you will pay over the years, applying at half a dozen schools just in case starts to look cheap...

#10 kerilyntaryn

Posted 19 April 2019 - 12:46 AM

I dont know those schools,  but some you have to put your name down when you are pregnant

#11 melburnian

Posted 26 April 2019 - 12:07 AM

My son has been on the waitlist for Caulfield (Not Wheelers Hill) since he was 3 months old and didn't get a place for ELC3, 4, and not for Prep next year either. If you put him on at 18 months, I don't like your chance for Caulfield but it depends on that particular year I think.

Try different schools too -
St Leonard's
St Michael's
Kilvington
Ivanhoe Grammar etc

#12 melanieb530

Posted 26 April 2019 - 01:26 AM

My feeling is that it can be a bit of an illusion that is created to make people think that places are more difficult to come by with the whole waitlist system. As Muffin Queen said, in WA it is generally quite possible to transfer into a lot of the more elite private schools quite easily in any of the non "main intake" years, particularly if your child's last lot of NAPLAN results are above average. There always seem to be a few spots. Anecdotally I know a couple of examples where younger siblings of a child already at the school (who had been waitlisted for a few years and officially should be high priority for a place) didn't get a place in the main intake years. Interestingly, in both situations the children were, let's say, not particularly academically able/inclined. It feeds the circulating stories of people "missing out" ... yet other children who hadn't been on the waitlist as long and didn't have a sibling at the school transferred into the same year groups later on. I know another case where someone wanted to change schools, were initially told there was a long waitlist, provided copies of very good previous NAPLAN and school reports, quite quickly offered a place for next year and then suddenly offered a place for next term only a couple of weeks later.

Edited by melanieb530, 26 April 2019 - 02:05 AM.


#13 born.a.girl

Posted 26 April 2019 - 05:36 AM

 melanieb530, on 26 April 2019 - 01:26 AM, said:

My feeling is that it can be a bit of an illusion that is created to make people think that places are more difficult to come by with the whole waitlist system. As Muffin Queen said, in WA it is generally quite possible to transfer into a lot of the more elite private schools quite easily in any of the non "main intake" years, particularly if your child's last lot of NAPLAN results are above average. There always seem to be a few spots. Anecdotally I know a couple of examples where younger siblings of a child already at the school (who had been waitlisted for a few years and officially should be high priority for a place) didn't get a place in the main intake years. Interestingly, in both situations the children were, let's say, not particularly academically able/inclined. It feeds the circulating stories of people "missing out" ... yet other children who hadn't been on the waitlist as long and didn't have a sibling at the school transferred into the same year groups later on. I know another case where someone wanted to change schools, were initially told there was a long waitlist, provided copies of very good previous NAPLAN and school reports, quite quickly offered a place for next year and then suddenly offered a place for next term only a couple of weeks later.


In Melbourne, it is definitely not an illusion, for a handful of schools, starting in Prep.

Spaces do become available as people move around later on, and not everyone sits on a waiting list waiting for that elusive spot if their kid is happy elsewhere.

Our anecdote at a $$$ private girls' school, with a daughter who received an ATAR at the very low end, was that we were never given any hint that she wasn't welcome to stay there.  Some girls left for other reasons, but I never heard one example of it being suggested another school would better suit a low performer.

As I said, it's only a handful, but it's a definite fact - shame because who knows which school will suit the child?

Most of the others will have waiting lists for specific years, year 5, 7, 11 most often. Same applies to those secondary years at some of the better regarded state secondary schools, too.




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