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Most impressive lunchbox - do you agree?


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#1 Renovators delight

Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:51 AM

Read this article this morning:
https://www.abc.net....graphs/10759890

They went to primary schools in Brighton (rich bayside bit of Melbourne) and Broadmeadows (not rich working/welfare class bit of Melbourne) and photographed lunches.

Things that made me mad about this article:
  • there were no photographs of empty desks/bags/lunchboxes to represent the reality, that there were children at both schools with no lunch.
  • there was no acknowledgement of the conditions of the families from which children brought in 'more packaged food', for example, much of that packaged food may have come from charity.
  • the demonising of the humble Vegemite sandwich as it comes on white bread and lacks in protein

And the thing that irritated me the most was the "most impressive lunchbox"

Posted Image

Which still has two packaged items, seems very expensive and I suspect was only the "most impressive" because of the lack of sambo.

In my opinion, opinionated people should stay the hell out of lunchboxes, and concentrate on getting lunches to the children without them, instead of giving me a 5 point plan to get my children off the Vegemite.

WDYT?

#2 Bethlehem Babe

Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:54 AM

Yeah. I agree with everyone of your points.

They criticised the ham sandwich.
They didn’t like the cheese sandwich.


Whatever.

I feed my kids what we have in the pantry and what they will eat.

#3 seayork2002

Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:56 AM

I send what my son will eat, sure photos can give people ideas so I have no hate of them but again for me a bit pointless if my son won't eat it.

Just because there are photos and articles/research out there we don't have to take it is and feel judged by it, we can just move on to what interests us.

So what I think is a green salad with smoked salmon or home made Thai green curry in a thermos with jasmine rice would be sent to school if my son ate it, he eats a cheese sandwich so that is what is sent.

#4 sarahec

Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:58 AM

I could send an impressive lunch no problem but my son wouldn’t eat it.
I send veg sticks, fruit, yogurt, vegemite sandwich and crackers. Basic but he eats it.

Edited by sarahec, 12 February 2019 - 10:59 AM.


#5 rainycat

Posted 12 February 2019 - 10:58 AM

It really annoyed me too, I couldn’t finish reading it as it was unrealistic dribble.
All of the packaging in the Brighton lunchbox wouldn’t fly at my kids school.

#6 Kreme

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:03 AM

I found the article irritating too. Like referring to a ham sandwich as a “ham and butter” sandwich, to make it sound just that bit worse.

I was surprised there was so much Nutella and peanut butter. My kids have never been able to take nuts to school as they have classmates with allergies.

#7 casime

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:08 AM

Well my son has a strawberry jam and salami sandwich today.  Because despite his questionable taste in sandwich topping, it's what he eats.

As a teacher, I'm just happy when they actually bring lunch and I don't have to run around ringing home or trying to rustle up a sandwich in the staff room.

#8 Nerdette

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:09 AM

Mandy sacher is an unqualified charlatan...don't trust any article that quotes her

#9 Tomahawk

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:11 AM

I saw that on FB and didn't read the article but I read the comments- bleurgh. There were people actually posting pictures of their kids lunch box contents so people could see how awesome they were and some pretty horrible opinions.

#10 HolierThanCow

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:12 AM

It annoyed me that they chose the 'worst' of the Broadmeadows and the 'best' of the Brighton lunchboxes for the zoomed-in graphics. It made it seem like the nutritional gap was much wider than if you looked at every individual box.

Maybe lower income families can't afford to buy healthy food for lunch boxes if it will just be thrown in the bin at the end of the day. Everything bought has to be eaten, so they buy and send what will definitely be eaten, perhaps?

#11 Octopodes

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:15 AM

If vegemite is now bad, they'd hate me, DS has a honey sandwich everyday. It is effectively sugar slapped between two pieces of wholegrain bread.

I can never decide if these sorts of articles are more offensive or more ridiculous. Either way, they are lazy.

#12 kirstenfleur

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:15 AM

Jeepers. It's food. Focus on the kids who have nothing to eat!

#13 Riotproof

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:17 AM

View Postkirstenfleur, on 12 February 2019 - 11:15 AM, said:

Jeepers. It's food. Focus on the kids who have nothing to eat!

Can’t we focus on both?

#14 nup

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:20 AM

Riotproof decades of focus on this issue haven't had any impact. If anything the lunchboxes are getting worse because people are time poor and kids convenience foods are far worse than they used to be. Let's just assume that most kids get their nutritional needs met at home.  Otherwise the evidence of malnourished children would be a national disaster.

#15 casime

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:22 AM

It also doesn't take a lot of aspects into account.  In any classroom, you'll have a whole spectrum of families and therefore a whole spectrum of lunchbox contents.  Some families may be relying on food hampers, where prepackaged food is more common and they have to give their children what they get.  Some families have extra assistance in the form of cleaners or nannies, so more time.  Some families have one child, some have 10.  Some may be dealing with issues that are more important than spending a lot of time making lunchboxes.  Some parents enjoy spending their time baking and putting lunchboxes together, some are just happy if their child eats lunch.  Some families are dealing with allergies and additional needs.  Some kids like sandwiches, some won't touch them.  

Ironically, some of the best looking lunchboxes I've ever seen were from some of the poorer families in my school.  Refugee and immigrant families that would send their kids in with leftovers from dinner the night before.  I'd often sit there and drool.  Best day ever was when one child told his mum I thought his lunch always looked awesome and she came in with a big platter of food for me the day after one of their festivals lol!

#16 JoanJett

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:24 AM

What is so often forgotten in these articles, is that children eat their lunches 5-6 hours after they're prepared.  Even with insulated lunch bags and ice bricks, it is really difficult to keep food fresh and appealing when schools bags are often left outside in 30+ degree weather in summer.  

I have good eaters, but they will only take certain fruit/vegetables to school and only have certain wrap/sandwich fillings, because they tell me they just don't like how so many other things taste after hours in the lunch box.  Having lunch at home is one of their favourite things about holidays.

I was also surprised at the amount of nutella/peanut butter allowed at schools, if they were primary schools. I have a son on a high calorie diet, and the school hours are the most difficult, as many of the ways to boost his protein intake include nuts.  We work around it, but I wondered if these schools don't have restrictions in place, or if it was symptomatic of how many people ignore them.

#17 Riotproof

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:24 AM

View Postnup, on 12 February 2019 - 11:20 AM, said:

Riotproof decades of focus on this issue haven't had any impact. If anything the lunchboxes are getting worse because people are time poor and kids convenience foods are far worse than they used to be. Let's just assume that most kids get their nutritional needs met at home.  Otherwise the evidence of malnourished children would be a national disaster.

They’re generally not malnourished. They’re over nourished with sugar, salt, fat..

I don’t understand why articles like this always get people’s backs up.

#18 nup

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:25 AM

Food pantries are appalling in my area. Packaged foods for next to nothing whilst the fresh foods are still binned by the stupermarkets. I'm starting to understand why there are too many conspiracy theorists. Aldi seem to be the only chain who donates their damaged or imperfect produce in my area

#19 mm1981

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:26 AM

The main thing that surprised me was how much food there was in the "best" lunchbox. A decent sized serving of cous cous, a muffin, a packet of popcorn, a muesli bar and some token veggies?

That seems like a hell of a lot of food for 6 hours. I imagine most kids would have a snack when they got home too?

#20 JRA

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:28 AM

Sandwiches exist in lunch boxes for a reason. They are convenient, last well, and easy for busy kids to eat.

#21 casime

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:28 AM

Quote

We work around it, but I wondered if these schools don't have restrictions in place, or if it was symptomatic of how many people ignore them.



My old school didn't have a nut free policy.  To be honest, trying to police one would have been almost impossible with the demographic we had.  



#22 Renovators delight

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:29 AM

View PostRiotproof, on 12 February 2019 - 11:24 AM, said:

They’re generally not malnourished. They’re over nourished with sugar, salt, fat..

I don’t understand why articles like this always get people’s backs up.

I don't know if my back is up, exactly, just I didn't see what was so great and 'impressive' about a lunch box with packaged popcorn, a packaged premium museli bar and a fancy salad that, realistically, many children are unlikely to want in their lunch.

Nor did I think I need a 5 point plan to get my children off vegemite sandwiches, which make up a portion of 5 of their meals (maximum) each week. I found the article to be patronising and focused on issues that appear to be less issues and more preferences.

#23 cabbage88

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:30 AM

P**s off to this woman!! She even pulled the "some are mislabelled as adhd but it's because of their food". Seriously!!
My daughter has chopped capsicum, cucumber, almonds, hummus, fruit and crackers. Maybe it's because of crackers she had adhd?
So judgemental of everyone. No acknowledgment that a kid might have a box full of packaged foods in Broadmeadows because they are given by mums in needs groups.

#24 Octopodes

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:30 AM

Policy around nuts is changing. Unless you have a child with severe allergies, then it is better to teach the child with the allergy (and the other children) how to avoid contamination instead of removing the allergen from the school environment. The rest of the world will not be nut free.

My child has a mild peanut allergy, his school is not nut free, in 6 years he's never had a reaction at school.

Obviously life threatening allergies are different.

#25 nup

Posted 12 February 2019 - 11:33 AM

View PostRiotproof, on 12 February 2019 - 11:24 AM, said:



They’re generally not malnourished. They’re over nourished with sugar, salt, fat..

I don’t understand why articles like this always get people’s backs up.

Most children aren't over nourished. Most sit in the middle. Childhood obesity is extremely overstated and whilst people focus on BMIs of children they're overlooking less convenient issues.

Edited by nup, 12 February 2019 - 11:33 AM.





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