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Gentle ways to encourage dry nights


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#1 Crazy4

Posted 07 February 2019 - 08:51 PM

DS6 is still in nappies at night and has never woken up dry. I occasionally check his nappy when I go to bed and he has already wet it. He hasn’t refused nappies at night yet but I know it’s starting to bother him, mainly I think because he is a twin and his twin has been in undies since they were 3.

I have placed absolutely no pressure on him to wear undies to bed as I know at 6 he is still in the normal age to not be dry but still would love some tips on ways to encourage it in particular the idea of increasing water during day and limiting liquid before bed if that is a thing?

We do toilet before bed, we limit water after dinner. What else could we try? And what age is the right age to expect to be dry? I remember reading 7?? which he isn’t far off.

#2 aace

Posted 07 February 2019 - 08:59 PM

Because it is a developmental thing there is nothing you can actually do other than wait at this age. Limiting water in ineffective. DS is just starting to become dry now and he is 7 in July. GP said to come back if he wasn't dry at 8.

#3 MissMilla

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:00 PM

Have you tried just leaving it off for a week or so?

DS had soaking nappies at the age of 4.5 years. I had to change him in the middle of the night because otherwise the nappy would leak. For this reason i decided since i have to change sheets anyways i might as well leave the nappy off. He was wet for 2 nights and after that it was perfect and he got up himself to pee.

He went to stay at my mums once about a month after he got dry. She didnt trust him and put a nappy on. The nappy was completely soaked. So even after being dry he never has a dry nappy.

Maybe just give it a try?

#4 Crazy4

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:02 PM

View Postaace, on 07 February 2019 - 08:59 PM, said:

Because it is a developmental thing there is nothing you can actually do other than wait at this age. Limiting water in ineffective. DS is just starting to become dry now and he is 7 in July. GP said to come back if he wasn't dry at 8.

Thanks. Yes, I think the age might have been 7 but they have increased to 8.

#5 Crazy4

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:06 PM

View PostMissMilla, on 07 February 2019 - 09:00 PM, said:

Have you tried just leaving it off for a week or so?

DS had soaking nappies at the age of 4.5 years. I had to change him in the middle of the night because otherwise the nappy would leak. For this reason i decided since i have to change sheets anyways i might as well leave the nappy off. He was wet for 2 nights and after that it was perfect and he got up himself to pee.

He went to stay at my mums once about a month after he got dry. She didnt trust him and put a nappy on. The nappy was completely soaked. So even after being dry he never has a dry nappy.

Maybe just give it a try?

Was thinking of trying when he hit 7 and see how we go but if I’m honest, I’m not ready to deal with wet sheets every night just yet.

He already gets himself up in the morning, takes his nappy of and goes to the toilet to wee then goes back to bed. But that nappy is still soaking wet.

#6 MissMilla

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:08 PM

There are paper mats you can put on the matress. We would put it over the sheet and then a bath towel over it so only the towel and paper gets wet.
After a couole dry nights we put the paper under the sheet so hes more comfortable.

#7 BrainFart

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:13 PM

Isn't there a hormone that kicks in and slows down urine production when sleeping ? Can recall exactly but with my ds I've been waiting for signs of that to happen. His nappy is still extremely full overnight.

My next phase will be to start getting him up overnight to go to the toilet. Hoping to trigger something that when he wakes he will think to do a wee aswell.

#8 Crombek

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:14 PM

We trialled a bedwetting alarm for ds1 when he turned 7. For weeks it went off multiple times a night & I was the only person in the household who ever woke. So we stopped. He’s now 7.5 and still no sign of being dry but late night dryness runs in my maternal family so I’m not worried yet.

I do have brolly sheets on all kids beds too because it is much easier than changing whole sheets.

#9 StartledFlamingo

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:16 PM

DS is nearly 7 and still wets every night. Mum was convinced he just needed a few nights without a nappy to learn- I disagreed. So I did it when we visited her. After a week of washing sheets (the disposable pads aren't sufficient) she conceded.

Edited by StartledFlamingo, 07 February 2019 - 09:17 PM.


#10 Crazy4

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:18 PM

View PostStartledFlamingo, on 07 February 2019 - 09:16 PM, said:

DS is nearly 7 and still wets every night. Mum was convinced he just needed a few nights without a nappy to learn- I disagreed. So I did it when we visited her. After a week of washing sheets (the disposable pads aren't sufficient) she conceded.

Well played.

#11 WaitForMe

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:29 PM

View PostCrazy4, on 07 February 2019 - 09:06 PM, said:

Was thinking of trying when he hit 7 and see how we go but if I’m honest, I’m not ready to deal with wet sheets every night just yet.

He already gets himself up in the morning, takes his nappy of and goes to the toilet to wee then goes back to bed. But that nappy is still soaking wet.

Huggies make disposable bed mats.

They say to put them under the sheet but I suspect thats SIDS related.

#12 JoanJett

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:38 PM

Posting this link because there is plenty of good practical information.

https://www.rch.org....ets/bedwetting/

At 6, it's a problem if it's a problem for you and your family. The developmental range is still wide, particularly for boys.

But the overwhelming advice is that nappies don't help dryness.  They do reduce frustration in families.  

As someone who has trod the path, when you are all ready as a family, ditch the nappies, multiple layers, multiple sheet sets/protectors ready to go, multiple checks and be prepared for it to take a while.  Steps forward, steps back.  The most important thing is to be detached and non-judgemental.  If it gets too much, take a break and try again at a later date.  And if you find it all too much and you need support, tap into your local children's hospital's Continence Clinic.  There are also similar private options available if you have the means/inclination.

#13 red_squirrel

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:39 PM

It’s a developmental thing. One day they just wake up and it happens overnight. This is for most kids, providing they don’t have other issues. Most kids are fine from this point on provided they aren’t over stressed.

Then it reverses somewhere at 50+ years of age and you are getting up several times a night.

#14 ballogo

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:48 PM

I second what a lot of people have said.  My son wasn't dry until 8 years old and no one would see him until about that age.  We went to an incontinence nurse at 8 years old.  She beautifully explained to my DS all about training his bladder by drinking more.  Every time this topic comes up you hear about children having their drinks restricted before bed etc. however she encouraged him to drink more throughout the day and before bed.  She explained that he needed to train his bladder to be able to hold more urine through the day so that he could also do that at night.

In terms of the alarm, there is a particular way to use it.  She was very specific about its use.  If he slept through the alarm we had to forcibly wake him and only he was allowed to turn the alarm off.  What this did was associate the alarm and wetting with his full bladder.  So the alarm would go off, I would wake up and stumble down to his room.  I would wake him and force him up to the alarm.  The alarm had to be placed away from his bed so that he had to get up to turn it off.  He took off his wet PJs and then part of the routine was to go to the toilet even if he had emptied his bladder.  I measured the diameter of the wet patch and changed his sheets (I layered up the bed so that I just had to take off the top layer and place it in the washing machine).

All of these served to train his brain and bladder to understand when his bladder was full, to wake himself up and to go to the toilet.

We got there after a couple of months!

OP your child is still quite young.  Wait a couple more years and then investigate options.

#15 MissMilla

Posted 07 February 2019 - 11:39 PM

Yes i know it wont work for all kids, just thought id share what worked for us.

I removed it because a friend told me she did with her son and after a week of wetting thw bed he was fine all of a sudden. For us it only took 2 days luckily. So yea, it could work but of course he might just not be ready

#16 SummerStar

Posted 08 February 2019 - 05:10 AM

We use a waterproof protector that is just big enough to tuck around each side of the matress and covers from chest to thigh area. My daughter is still wetting the bed about 4 nights out of 7 so not every night. Sometimes she will be dry for days then wet for days. She is 7.5.

What do they do for them after 8 if still doing this? She now changes her bed herself if she does it she wakes and gathers the protector and top sheet that usually is wet and puts it all in a pile with her wet undies and Pjs. It's frustrating for her and us but I'm not sure how we can stop it.

#17 Charli73

Posted 08 February 2019 - 06:08 AM

My DS was 7 when we stopped wearing pull ups overnight. We went to undies and yes had quite a few accidents but wee accident free now for about 2 months and we turn 8 next month.

I put two brolly sheets and 2 fitted sheets over the top of them (mattress protector, brolly, fitted then brolly then fitted sheet) so that if he had an accident overnight I only removed the top two and popped him back in bed.. much easier to deal with at 3am..

It is a hormone that just develops with age so there’s not much that can be done. I wouldn’t worry unless he were 8 and still not showing any signs of being dry.

We also don’t give any liquids after dinner either.

Edited by Charli73, 08 February 2019 - 06:10 AM.


#18 Mrs Twit

Posted 08 February 2019 - 06:50 AM

We used to get my DD up at about 10-11pm and walk her to the toilet. She would barely wake up, but would go and then head back to bed. We were talking about it this morning and she vaguely remembers it almost 10 years on.

I don't know whether this actually helped, or whether it was just time as others have said but eventually we got there.

I also second the PPs who mentioned layering the bed so you just strip off the wet layer and new sheets are ready to go underneath.

#19 Mose

Posted 08 February 2019 - 07:12 AM

I had a similar experience as a PP, in that we never had a dry night nappy. One day aged around 5 DS just announced he didn't need a night nappy.  Given stubbornness levels, I thought easier to let him try it for a night, discover how miserable waking up wet is, and then we could discuss wearing nappies.  

He showed me!

Amazingly, he was still having the odd day accident at the time, but nights were easy.

I now have a two year old who is dry all night, gets put on the toilet for a morning wee, doesn't do it, and then soaks through a nappy minutes later! I am not even actively wanting to train her, but I must say that particular behaviour is frustrating!

#20 seayork2002

Posted 08 February 2019 - 08:09 AM

DS just had night nappies till he was mostly dry, I was not going to get into negotiations putting a nappy on a wriggly boy was enough effort!

#21 JomoMum

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:22 AM

As someone mentioned above, its only a problem if it’s a problem for you and/or him.

Wet sheets isn’t too daunting (and much easier to deal with in Summer) - multi layers of waterproof protectors/sheets on top of each other - peel one off at a time then hop straight back into bed.

I assume you’re doing all the other things they suggest? Limiting drinks in the evening etc.

We take DS for a “dream wee” about 10-10.30, and when he was just out of nappies, either DH or I would also do a 2-3am one (DS made the decision to stop wearing them in winter).

#22 liveworkplay

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:39 AM

It is a hormonal/neural pathway that has to develop so there is nothing you can do to hasten it. Most enuresis clinics won't do anything until they are 8. I had one of my girls night dry two weeks after she was out of daytime nappies at 2.5 yrs, one 6 months after she was out of day time nappies at 3.5 yrs and one 6.5 years after she was out of day time nappies at nearly 9 years old.  Don't limit liquids, encourage toileting before bed and wait.

#23 Daffy2016

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:53 AM

I don’t mean to hijack OP, but when people say to later sheets and protectors so they’re easy to change at night, what do you do about the quilt?

#24 JoanJett

Posted 15 February 2019 - 07:48 PM

View PostDaffy2016, on 08 February 2019 - 10:53 AM, said:

I don’t mean to hijack OP, but when people say to later sheets and protectors so they’re easy to change at night, what do you do about the quilt?

We had/have multiple. Of everything!  Ikea/Target/Kmart all have reasonably priced quilts.  I invested more in mattress protectors.  Even with the multiple layers, we still had to do whole bed changes.  We still have occasional nights of doing that at 8.  My husband and I could win the Olympics for complete bed change/shower combo.  Not sure what the medal would be - a golden toilet?

#25 StartledFlamingo

Posted 15 February 2019 - 10:05 PM

DS is a side sleeper and doesn't tend to wet the quilt much. He also tends to get himself up and changed and just come in to our bed.




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