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Marie Kondo and sparking joy


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#1 StillDreaming

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:13 PM

I read half of her book a while back and have watched a couple of episodes of ‘Tidying Up’... I am really keen to go through the steps and get rid of a lot of things but I feel like if I go through my wardrobe and only keep the items that spark joy in me, I will basically have to get rid of 75% of what I own... Has anyone done this? Any tips? If I could afford to get rid of the things that don’t spark joy and slowly add things that do, I’d do it. Perhaps it will just be a long term project.

#2 MrsPuddleduck

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:21 PM

Pretty sure there was a massive Kondo thread a while back if you do a search :)

#3 Ellie bean

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:24 PM

My toilet brush doesn’t spark joy but I need it... (I don’t like the whole Marie Kondo thing at all personally)

#4 tayto...

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:25 PM

Yep I have done it, in a few phases over the last 6 months or so, and essentially have a completely different wardrobe to what I did this time last year. I feel happy and comfortable wearing anything in there now, for the first time ever in my adult life. There were a couple of items I was holding onto for some reason and it was the "does this really spark joy?" that saw me toss them! I am not into fashion and am very ok having a limited, plain wardrobe so that probably made it easier. Go for it! The liberation is awesome

#5 Riotproof

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:26 PM

 Ellie bean, on 09 January 2019 - 05:24 PM, said:

My toilet brush doesn’t spark joy but I need it... (I don’t like the whole Marie Kondo thing at all personally)

But the clean toilet does spark joy, and that’s a tool you need to get one. Some things are utilitarian.

I am in fact a total Kondo failure.

Edited by Riotproof, 09 January 2019 - 05:28 PM.


#6 tayto...

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:28 PM

And I love getting the perfect utilitarian objects, that are more efficient and well designed

#7 IkeaAddict

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:36 PM

I just read a News article about her methods. I like her method for folding clothes so you fit more in less space and can see them without rifling through stuff. SOOO much stuff I have doesn't give me joy but are kind've necessary.....toilet brush (as per a PP), medicines, cables, cords etc.

I, too, like a PP, would be left with very little clothing if I did her declutter method of stuff bringing you joy. I have stuff I KNOW I haven't worn in 12 months that I am pretty sure is just going to GO

#8 Serinitynow

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:37 PM

I watched an episode of the show on Netflix last night. I swear their house looked very little different afterwards. It looked like a lot of effort for a very small outcome to me.

#9 StillDreaming

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:37 PM

 MrsPuddleduck, on 09 January 2019 - 05:21 PM, said:

Pretty sure there was a massive Kondo thread a while back if you do a search :)

Will do. Thanks.

Tayto.tired - that’s great to hear that you had a lot of success with the wardrobe. I’ll defonitely be giving it a go. I’ve tried in the past but often hold on to things ‘just in case’ and never wear them...

I started in the wrong order and tackled the kitchen first so I’ll need to start again. No doubt I’ll get rid of a lot more again next time around! It is definitely liberating! I’ll be moving in a few months too so would love to only take the things that I love.

#10 StillDreaming

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:41 PM

 Serinitynow, on 09 January 2019 - 05:37 PM, said:

I watched an episode of the show on Netflix last night. I swear their house looked very little different afterwards. It looked like a lot of effort for a very small outcome to me.

I feel like it’s knowing that there is a lot less tucked away that doesn’t need to be there that makes you feel better. I love knowing that any mess that is created at home is easy to fix because everything has a home. It’s when I have to start creating spots for things that I know I’ve lost control a bit and need to go through things again. I have never been harsh enough though with my decluttering so hopefully it lasts longer if I do do it properly.

#11 Seven of Nine

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:44 PM

 Serinitynow, on 09 January 2019 - 05:37 PM, said:

I watched an episode of the show on Netflix last night. I swear their house looked very little different afterwards. It looked like a lot of effort for a very small outcome to me.

I don't know what you're taking about! The before photos were in black and white and the after photos were in colour!! Very different.

I felt the same after watching. Their house looked the same and it was very unsatisfying. "Consumed" (also on Netflix) was far more motivational for me.

Edited by Seven of Nine, 09 January 2019 - 05:45 PM.


#12 Renovators delight

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:52 PM

I KonMari'd my chest of drawers yesterday. Only about 3 items of my clothing actually spark joy, and none of them fit, lol.

However, I did manage to convince myself to turf half a bag full of literally holey old clothes with perished elastic that had been mouldering at the back of drawers.

I now have a very pleasingly folded bottom drawer, and a spot for some random things that had been shoved. Plus I found a heap of more casual long sleeved things that will be perfect for winter now I am a woman of leisure and no longer have to comply with any absurd work dress codes.

Not sure if I will find the enthusiasm to tackle DPs or the children's things...

We have recently had a big tidy up and installed lots of specific toy drawers, but the book thing - we have about 4,000 books. And the house generally looks like a daycare centre vomited all over it.

#13 wannabe30

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:55 PM

I haven’t watched the show, but I have Kondoed in the past.

I was pretty ruthless with the wardrobe and probably did dump about 75% of it. I ended up with a very “uniform” selection of outfits, which sound boring but it means I can get dressed every morning knowing that the outfit will suit me and fits me well. It might be the exact same outfit that I wore last week, and it probably looks almost identical to what I wore yesterday, but that’s what makes it liberating and sparks joy for me.

I did identify where I needed to buy more things - eg I worked out that I needed a couple more black tshirts so I didn’t end up topless before each washing day, so I bought 2 more of the same brand I already had, since they were the tshirts that I obviously loved enough to keep and wear every day.

#14 EmmDasher

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:56 PM

I’ve done it. I quite like the method.

I think capsule wardrobes & Konmari go very well hand in hand. I was actually going capsule wardrobing before I went through my clothes and I basically just sold/donated everything that wasn’t in my capsule & never would be. As I prepared my capsule I made a list of items I wanted. Every time I thought, “I wish I had a (brown belt/whatever)” I noted it down and then only shopped to that list.

I think if you think you’ll want to get rid of most of your wardrobe but can’t afford to replace you follow the same approach. Keep a small capsule of pieces even if you don’t love them and then gradually replace them as you get the money and find the perfect items. Identifying why they don’t spark joy will help you know what you’re looking for.

As for the toilet brush and utilitarian items, you don’t have to be in raptures about them. You keep them because you’re happy and grateful they help you to get a job done. Maybe one day you will find one that does give you raptures but that is not essential and it’s a bit consumerist to dump everything like that and replace it with items that do the same job for the sake of it. That said, most people don’t need 6 toilet brushes (or whatever the item is). The point of piling them all is to identify, “we have 250 half used biros in this house- let’s cut it down to our 20 favorites and keep them all in the same place (or other sensible home) so we can easily find them when we need them.”

#15 Pooks Combusted

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:58 PM

I want to do this. I also plan to stop buying crap in the first instance.

#16 Hypnic Jerk

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:58 PM

Did the en-suite contents today.  Feeling particularly joyless.

#17 EmmDasher

Posted 09 January 2019 - 05:59 PM

 Serinitynow, on 09 January 2019 - 05:37 PM, said:

I watched an episode of the show on Netflix last night. I swear their house looked very little different afterwards. It looked like a lot of effort for a very small outcome to me.

Episode 1 is a bit like that. I feel like it really shows how with little kids even comparatively smallish clutter can feel insurmountable. Episode 2 is like an episode of Christmas hoarders.

 Boganly Pooks, on 09 January 2019 - 05:58 PM, said:

I want to do this. I also plan to stop buying crap in the first instance.

I think this is the real power of the method. It makes you very conscious of how much you owner and to really consider how you want to live. It has inspired us to really change our approach to waste & consuming because the volume of stuff we had tucked away was a bit embarrassing.

Edited by EmmDasher, 09 January 2019 - 06:05 PM.


#18 sueratbag

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:12 PM

I have done a 'Marie Kondo' on my wardrobe. It was great. I was honestly amazed at how many items I had that I never wore. The OK ones were Opshopped, and the tatty dreadfuls were promoted to the rag bag for DH's workshop. (Now all I have to do is persuade him that when he wants to check the oil, he can use a rag rather than his handkerchief.) It didn't make any difference to my daily wardrobe, because I never wore the things I disposed of anyway, and it showed me clearly what I had and what I needed. Actually, now I think of it, it increased my daily wardrobe, because I found a whole lot of things that I'd forgotten I had.

Haven't seen the show, but know the book. If the house on the show doesn't look any different, it may be because the change is in the cupboards and wardrobes and so on. I know the way my drawers are organised now means that I can just open them and see instantly what I have ready to wear, but the bedroom doesn't look any different because the clothes weren't lying around anyway. They were just stuffed in drawers.

I was honestly amazed at how I felt - 'lighter' might describe it best. It was a whole mindset change, like 'This is my house. Stuff can be here if and only if I want it it be.'

Edited by sueratbag, 09 January 2019 - 06:13 PM.


#19 Jane Jetson

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:13 PM

All my useless crap and now-vintage clothing sparks joy, that's why I bought it in the first place.

And the reason we have six potato peelers is that DH and the DDs lose everything constantly and put them in new and creative places every time they wash up, etc. It sparks joy when I can open the drawer they're supposed to be in and actually find one of the six there. Negative joy is sparked when I have to go on a magical mystery tour trying to find something we only have a couple of.

Not a Kondo fan, in other words.

#20 EmmDasher

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:20 PM

I don’t know, it sounds counter intuitive but because we don’t have multiples of everything, all the things have a clear home and they don’t really get placed in odd spots anymore or lost in amongst everything. I got rid of so much from our kitchen and I haven’t missed any of it.

#21 Rowenas Necklace

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:34 PM

 wannabe30, on 09 January 2019 - 05:55 PM, said:

I haven’t watched the show, but I have Kondoed in the past.

I was pretty ruthless with the wardrobe and probably did dump about 75% of it. I ended up with a very “uniform” selection of outfits, which sound boring but it means I can get dressed every morning knowing that the outfit will suit me and fits me well. It might be the exact same outfit that I wore last week, and it probably looks almost identical to what I wore yesterday, but that’s what makes it liberating and sparks joy for me.

Do you mind if I ask what your basic uniform is? I'm considering taking this approach, but I keep going back and forth on it.

#22 Chaotic Pogo

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:36 PM

The Kondo book is available as Kobo e-book for $5 ATM.

I've tried to do my clothes. I now keep them all rolled / stacked /  in separate small boxes in drawers and it has been really brilliant. I'm also doing the capsule thing - I noticed I didnt stick to the list, bought a black pair of jeans and suddenly had to buy shoes, a shirt etc etc because nothing went with them.

Cheaper to donate the jeans and stick to blue ones!

#23 taters

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:39 PM

My hubby is very minimalist and over 12 years I have slowly come on board with it. And it is incredible. It has taken me a long time to get rid of excess things, things I had sentimental attachment to, things that I thought I needed or had multiples of. I didnt do the spark joy concept but can see how it would work. I do declutters all the time even though each time I dont think there is anything more to get rid of. My house is so much cleaner and doesnt get messy because we literally have no junk anymore. It is liberating because we dont have clutter and dont have to spend more than a few minutes each day tidying things. It has been life changing for me and i actually decluttered my mums walk in robe for her. I so hope she lets me help her do the rest of her house lol it feels so good to get rid of stuff even if its not mine! My clothes were hard to get rid of but overtime I have been able to just comb through and get rid of bits and pieces. It really takes time to let go of things and thats fine too. Good luck with your decluttering journey :)

#24 sueratbag

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:41 PM

 Jane Jetson, on 09 January 2019 - 06:13 PM, said:

All my useless crap and now-vintage clothing sparks joy, that's why I bought it in the first place.

And the reason we have six potato peelers is that DH and the DDs lose everything constantly and put them in new and creative places every time they wash up, etc. It sparks joy when I can open the drawer they're supposed to be in and actually find one of the six there. Negative joy is sparked when I have to go on a magical mystery tour trying to find something we only have a couple of.

Not a Kondo fan, in other words.

Actually, you're still following Marie Kondo's principles, because for you, having 6 potato peelers is what gives you what you want. (Murdering DH and DDs may achieve the same thing, but would probably have Consequences.  You're safer to stick to the 6 potato peelers.) ;)

Ditto the clothes. The principle is not the you have one only of utilitarian items, or a limited amount of clothing, but rather that you have in your home only the things that you want to have there, and that bring you joy. And if that's 6 potato peelers and lots of vintage clothes, then go for it! Your home, your rules.

What I found liberating was getting rid of things that no longer brought joy. There is a temptation to keep things because they were expensive, or they were a present, or you used to love them but don't now, or you 'ought' to love them. Regardless of why they were there in the first place, if they did not bring me joy now, then I got rid of them. Like my husband's 1981 'Big M Marathon' T shirt. I'd kept it because I was proud of his dedication and achievement in running the marathon. I got rid of the T shirt, but the achievement and pride are still there.

Edited by sueratbag, 09 January 2019 - 06:44 PM.


#25 BBC

Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:50 PM

The episode with the lady whose husband had died was very moving.

I have been decluttering the kitchen and am pretty happy with it. Next I need to tackle the books. That will be harder.

I chucked a few clothes, but always have the issues of hoping/planning to lose weight and wanting to keep clothes I like that are too small, and not wanting to buy new things in my current size, (as soon they will be too big (maybe/ hopefully). How have people negotiated those issues?

Edited by BBC, 09 January 2019 - 06:51 PM.





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