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Seeing so many newborns night-sleeping with blankets..


61 replies to this topic

#1 amz43

Posted 15 March 2018 - 12:45 AM

I have seen so many newborns sleeping at night with a blanket on and I am left feeling confused. Aren't we told now NOT to leave a blanket on a newborn overnight due to SIDS? Of course I understand that if the baby is facing toward me in the stroller, etc. that it is fine use a blanket in that situation. I just don't get why people still use blankets at night without supervision. I mean, obviously it's for warmth. My mother persists in telling me over and over to use blankets at night to keep our baby warm, but there are so many other products out there (sleep swaddles, bags, sleep pouch type things) that are so much safer! What is your opinion of blankets in bed for newborns? A little bit of a controversial topic!

Edited by amz43, 15 March 2018 - 12:47 AM.


#2 Lou-bags

Posted 15 March 2018 - 01:56 AM

 amz43, on 15 March 2018 - 12:45 AM, said:

Aren't we told now NOT to leave a blanket on a newborn overnight due to SIDS?

No, we’re not?
https://rednose.com....v2017(web)_.pdf

Sleeping a newborn baby with blankets is well within the guidelines when done safely. In fact, blankets were provided in the maternity hospital I birthed at, and midwives used them on my babies. As did the nurses on the paediatric ward when we spent a week there with a then newborn DS2.

Both of my boys slept with a blanket tucked over them at times as small babies. I liked how it made regulating their temperature easy as I could add a blanket when I went to bed, once the night had got cooler- or take it off if they were too warm without having to disturb them too much.

#3 daisy007

Posted 15 March 2018 - 04:52 AM

My winter baby slept fully swaddled with another blanket then firmly tucked over him. Exactly how the nurses did it for the 5 weeks he spent in SCN. I think done correctly and safely there is no issue with tucking a blanket over a newborn. I’ll be sleeping no 2 the same way.

#4 ~J_F~

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:32 AM

I am not getting the blanket issue especially considering it’s within the SIDS guidelines.

We used sleeping bags and blankets when ours were newborns.

#5 Lunafreya

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:34 AM

My son was often swaddled and had a light blanket over him in winter. This is is perfectly ok.

#6 ~LM~

Posted 15 March 2018 - 05:54 AM

Like pp said, if you use a blanket safely, at the foot of the bed, tucked in, it’s fine. And a quick way to keep a swaddled baby warm.

It’s loose blankets and pillows and bumpers you need to avoid.

#7 Caribou

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:29 AM

Also used blankets and sleeping bags together. It’s been no drama here. Like others, tuck sheet in, keep baby at foot of bed and it’s fine.

#8 Lady Gray

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:32 AM

I thought the same thing OP after I had my daughter!  A mothercare nurse showed it was fine and how to safely use a blanket.

#9 Riotproof

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:44 AM

I've always thought the sleeping bags are pointless until the baby starts moving around. When they are new, provided you tuck the blankets in firmly and feet touch the bottom of the bed, it's all fine.

#10 lozoodle

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:53 AM

Always used blankets, it can be done safely within guidelines. I'm not sure of the point of this post other than to slam other parents for not doing the same as you? Also, I don't actually think its a controversial topic and perhaps those who do may need to get out a bit more often.

#11 Pooks Persisted

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:02 AM

You know the world of middle class mothering has completely lost the plot when we are getting judged for using blankets in bed.

*self-consciously mixes formula with sultanas while walking forward facing to the letterbox*

#12 JRA

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:02 AM

Absolutely wrong to use a blanket, 10 times better to let the poor thing freeze

#13 TheGreenSheep

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:12 AM

 JRA, on 15 March 2018 - 07:02 AM, said:

Absolutely wrong to use a blanket, 10 times better to let the poor thing freeze

Posting gold.

Both my DSs were born in the dead of winter. Singlet. Wondersuit. Swaddle. Sheet tucked in. Blanket.

If their little arms escaped they were fridge cold. Thankfully the blanket kept their bodies warm.

#14 Lallalla

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:18 AM

Actually the advice is to sleep the baby at the bottom of the cot with blankets firmly tucked in. But sure, let the baby freeze and get no sleep.

For the record my babies were swaddled, in a warm-pouch thing, the room was heated. and I still had to add a blanket when I went to bed myself because it gets so unbelievably cold here.

I think the main thing is not to leave their head covered, from memory

#15 Tayto2

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:23 AM

Yep it’s all about how you use them - tucked not loose - and I also read it’s better to get those breathable cotton blankets, so that’s what I used with both DDs until moving about and big enough for sleep sack. Then it was the warmer sleep sack in winter with the gro suit with padded arms.

#16 Lucla

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:28 AM

Yep, both mine had blankets tucked in firmly, they were both winter babies and we live rural so they would have actually frozen if I didn't use a blanket.

#17 green mango

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:32 AM

The midwives swaddled then tucked a light blanket across. So we continued this way until about 3 months when they progressed to sleeping bags.

#18 seayork2002

Posted 15 March 2018 - 07:38 AM

We used sleeping bags but only cause in 2007 when DS was born they were everywhere in the UK and our place was cold.

I never thought anything either way on blankets or not but then he slept on his stomach so i am probably going to hell anyway 🙂

#19 Caribou

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:08 AM

This is one of those time I rarely say this, but listen to your mother. She’s right. Be guided by your baby regarding warmth.

Remember those SIDS recommendations are a guide. There’s nothing controversial about using blankets if used correctly.

#20 Horangi

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:19 AM

I used blankets too.  Until he was moving and started kicking off the blankets and getting cold. I got sleeping bags then.

#21 Lunafreya

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:29 AM

Horangi, that’s when I stopped using bed clothes all together for a while and just used the sleeping bag. He had a Bonds one that was quilted like a doona.

#22 lucky 2

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:30 AM

https://rednose.com....by-sleeping-bag

It seems there are pluses for using a sleeping bag vs blankets for a newborn, but blankets are safe and acceptable if the baby is tucked in, baby at the bottom of the cot etc as per pp's above.

Buying purpose built items such as pouches, sleeping bags, swaddles etc cost money where a blanket can be used safely.
Not everyone would have the spare cash and blankets are cheap, effective and easily accessible.

#23 hills mum bec

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:30 AM

All three of my babies were born in July in an area with regular frosts.  There is no way I could not have used blankets.  DD wore a 3 layers of clothing under her 3tog sleeping bag and then still needed two blankets tucked in firmly to sleep warmly and comfortably.

#24 Oriental lily

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:44 AM

My 7 week old is currently sleeping with two thick warm blankets tucked over him and sleeping with his arms  over his head . He hates being swaddled ( like my 4 other children did ) and sleeping bags will be used when he gets a bit older and starts rolling around . The big thing is to make sure their feet touches the end of the bed so that the blankets don’t ride up over their head .

Sid’s guidelines have been around for a long time, way before sleeping bags became commonly in use and the Big ones to abide by are . Smoke free environment, on back ,bottom of bed , on own sleeping surface .

But they are only recommendations . Families need to do what works for them and the important thing to know is when  going outside those recommendations is why it’s risky so you can make an informed choice .

I co slept with my second child from day dot and I knew the risks and knew how to do it as safetly  as I could .

#25 Mrs Lost Wanderer

Posted 15 March 2018 - 08:49 AM

Seriously? I have had 5 kids who all have needed SCAN and NICU care and this is how the hospitals have kept them warm in the cots. Should I go back and tell them that they are doing it wrong?



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