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Getting more calories into my 6yo


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#1 petal71

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:02 PM

Hi - looking for recommendations for my 6yo who's fallen off his centile for weight and under the 3rd for BMI. He's tall and skinny and seems to have little appetite after a gastro bug a couple of months ago, not that he was great before that. We have been to GP and awaiting blood tests as he also has frequent bowel motions (always has, esp if he has too much fruit or possibly wheat - not sure on that one), so are testing for coeliacs. Also very frequent burping (like multiple times per minute at times) and "full" quickly. Have had him on two courses of probiotics since the gastro.

He is also quite picky. Not too bad I guess compared to many though. Wont eat yogurt, guacamole, peanut butter, nuts in general, red meat (apart from occasional sausages & bacon), not keen on sauces.

Likes - fish, chips, chicken, roast potatoes, cheese, bread (but gets full quickly), rice is hit and miss, olives, veggies, fruit (but see above - it goes straight through him).

I have started trying to get him to eat more early in the day as he has more appetite then, so doing a smoothie after he has had breakfast. Lunch is usually half eaten, dinner the same - he eats v slowly then his friends run off and play so he wants to join them. He has snacks at recess and after school.

SO any ideas for easy recipes? He will try new things esp if they involve his favourites.

I don't have a thermomix and have limited time to cook, so quick recipes are best : ) Thank you!!

#2 Riotproof

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:07 PM

How about eggs? Pizzas? Pasta with creamy sauce? Or pesto?

#3 petal71

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:21 PM

Yep he does eat eggs, but not in sandwiches (go figure). And gets grief from vegan friend if takes to school whole. So usually I just give them to him at weekend as not usually enough time at breakkie. I should try some little tarts with an egg / cheese filling - I have some pastry cases.

I do give him pizza for lunch sometimes.

Pasta with pesto - yes he will eat that. A dinner staple!

#4 mayahlb

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:32 PM

Eggs - you can sneak them into a tonne of things, esp sauces. Scrambled eggs mixed with ricotta, butter and a bit of cream for breakfast is good.

Smoothies can be great. I sneak in full fat high protein yoghurt, kids sustagen, peanut butter and it's pretty much hidden by the string vanilla flavour of the sustagen and the strawberries and mango I put in. (My kids also know if I serve up a smoothie that are required to drink the whole lot). My youngest currently gets one for breakfast.

I mix plain yoghurt/butter/cream and egg into a white sauce for pasta.

If he gets full easily I would got to multiple small meals during the day.

#5 fancie shmancie

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:32 PM

Egg flips?

#6 Riotproof

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:37 PM

You could make zucchini slice ahead of time and give it to him for breakfast. Given he likes bacon, egg and bacon pie is delicious. You could also make ahead breakfast burritos. Or a savoury egg bread casserole.. it's an American idea, I think the savoury version is called a strata.

Would he eat curries? My son loves curry, but I also make him curry puffs using the leftovers and commercial puff pastry. You can use cream, ground almonds in Indian style ones, and coconut cream in Thai.

Edited by Riotproof, 09 September 2017 - 09:40 PM.


#7 Mpjp is feral

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:37 PM

Pediasure was what our paed put my ds on. He's never been even on 'the chart', and whilst tall and very thin might be his build he has no reserves at all.

He has it once to twice a day, after meals.

He has never has any appetite (hospital admissions as a baby after I stupidly listened to a mchn who told me no baby ever starved themselves), has sensory issues meaning he's incredibly picky and is a terribly slow eater too.

Of course we do the usuals - full fat everything, protein in every meal, ds involved in planning meals & cooking, no snacking 2 hours before  meals etc. Only thing that has helped is supplement feeding.

#8 Riotproof

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:46 PM

I also just saved this to use up leftovers tortillas, that we always seem to have. http://www.recipetin...cheese-pockets/
You could make ahead and then just refresh in a sandwich press or oven in the morning.

#9 kusanagi

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:47 PM

My 2yo has similar likes and dislikes and is quite picky (fortunately no medical issues though), some things we make for her to sneak in some variety are fried rice (homemade with chicken, bacon, egg and veges), spinache quiche, wholemeal cruskits with hummus, ravioli with a small amount of sauce, pizza muffins. Could also try baked potatoes with different fillings or cauliflower cheese.

A nice substantial vege dish I make a lot is sweet potato and cauliflower chopped into cubes and tossed with a small amount of oil in a frypan or wok on med-high for about 10 - 15 mins until cooked thru and golden brown. In the last 5 mins add whatever combo of spices you like and a little butter. Makes a nice side dish or quick one bowl meal for a veg fan.

#10 MooGuru

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:51 PM

I had to have a smoothie with Sustagen, oats or wheatgerm (?), banana, peanut butter and LSA mix at least once a day to maintain my weight especially when I had a growth spurt. Luckily I loved it so it was my afternoon tea staple.

Does he like Baked Beans?  DS loved them and his medical team were very pro baked beans.

Edited to remove the same age bit as I would've been older.

Edited by MooGuru, 09 September 2017 - 09:52 PM.


#11 shabby_chic

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:54 PM

So many delicious suggestions here.

All l've got to add is boring French Toast. One of the ways l get egg in my DS. I whack an extra egg into pancake mix.

#12 DM. 2012

Posted 09 September 2017 - 09:55 PM

My 5 year DS has had some issues with bloating (he can get such a big round tummy) and mushy poos. X-rays and scans showed that he is full of gas though we don't get an unusual amount of burping or farting from him. A gastroenterologist referred him to a dietician who recommended the FODMAP diet for him. Wheat (but not gluten). Lactose dairy(though hard cheeses like Tastycheese are ok) and  fruit(esp juice) are high on the list if thing that are restricted on this. It is actually a diet for Irritable Bowel Syndrome. This should only be done through a dietician though.
My DS is a picky eater too and I really have no idea how to solve that problem.

Edited by DM. 2012, 09 September 2017 - 09:57 PM.


#13 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 09 September 2017 - 10:20 PM

Pediasure over Sustagen. Pediasure my paed said is complete meal replacement in terms of nutrition.

I have a child with Selective eating disorder and was concerned about nutrition.

Edited by Veritas Vinum Arte, 09 September 2017 - 10:21 PM.


#14 Not Escapin Xmas

Posted 10 September 2017 - 06:33 AM

That 'burping' is reflux. He's probably in a lot of pain. If you are in Sydney I would highly recommend the RPA Allergy Clinic. It sounds more like he has severe food intolerances. For now, you can give him infant gaviscon (2 sachets) after every meal. That should stop the reflux so that he's not in so much pain.

#15 mayahlb

Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:41 AM

View PostVeritas Vinum Arte, on 09 September 2017 - 10:20 PM, said:

Pediasure over Sustagen. Pediasure my paed said is complete meal replacement in terms of nutrition.

I have a child with Selective eating disorder and was concerned about nutrition.

It's funny because our Pead dietician gave us three opposite advice and said she recommended either the kids sustagen or the sustagen with fibre for under 12s. She said they are pretty much the same :shrug: we only really use it when kids are going through a non-eating phase, like at the moment where apparently 1 weetbix and some milk is fine for the whole day.

#16 Elle2k17

Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:47 AM

View PostNot Escapin Xmas, on 10 September 2017 - 06:33 AM, said:

That 'burping' is reflux. He's probably in a lot of pain. If you are in Sydney I would highly recommend the RPA Allergy Clinic. It sounds more like he has severe food intolerances. For now, you can give him infant gaviscon (2 sachets) after every meal. That should stop the reflux so that he's not in so much pain.

I second this. We see a dietician who works at the RPA Clinic but practices privately as well. They do offer Skype consultations too which is handy as we are many many hours away. They've been amazing! Really helped sort out the gas issues DS was having and magically when his tummy feels good he shovels food in like someone is about to take it away. On a day where his belly is unsettled and he is gassy he doesn't eat much at all.

They team you up with a paediatrician as well so you can do it all in one day if your traveling. They are worth their weight in gold!

#17 Elle2k17

Posted 10 September 2017 - 10:50 AM

View Postmayahlb, on 10 September 2017 - 10:41 AM, said:



It's funny because our Pead dietician gave us three opposite advice and said she recommended either the kids sustagen or the sustagen with fibre for under 12s. She said they are pretty much the same :shrug: we only really use it when kids are going through a non-eating phase, like at the moment where apparently 1 weetbix and some milk is fine for the whole day.

I think it's important to team up with a Pead and a knowledgeable qualified dietician for diet issues. Whilst the pead is highly qualified in children's health, they do not specialise in diet. You. An actually find specific children's dietician too.

#18 mayahlb

Posted 10 September 2017 - 11:48 AM

View PostElle2k17, on 10 September 2017 - 10:50 AM, said:



I think it's important to team up with a Pead and a knowledgeable qualified dietician for diet issues. Whilst the pead is highly qualified in children's health, they do not specialise in diet. You. An actually find specific children's dietician too.

Um is this aimed at me? Because we do have a qualified Pead dietician and developmental Pead on our team. I stated that about the Pead dietician in my post. They are the ones that recommended sustagen over pediasure. and I trust this dietician as they are highly qualified with a tonne of experience with all sorts of dietary issues.

Edited by mayahlb, 10 September 2017 - 11:49 AM.


#19 lizzzard

Posted 10 September 2017 - 12:56 PM

FWIW, our paed dietician recommended Sustagen. But OP, I think you should go and see a dietician so the can make some tailored recommendations.

#20 Elle2k17

Posted 10 September 2017 - 02:40 PM

View Postmayahlb, on 10 September 2017 - 11:48 AM, said:



Um is this aimed at me? Because we do have a qualified Pead dietician and developmental Pead on our team. I stated that about the Pead dietician in my post. They are the ones that recommended sustagen over pediasure. and I trust this dietician as they are highly qualified with a tonne of experience with all sorts of dietary issues.

Sorry wasn't trying to be nasty, must have come across the wrong way. I was really just commenting that I think it's important to team up with a dietician as well.

#21 mayahlb

Posted 10 September 2017 - 02:53 PM

View PostElle2k17, on 10 September 2017 - 02:40 PM, said:



Sorry wasn't trying to be nasty, must have come across the wrong way. I was really just commenting that I think it's important to team up with a dietician as well.

I didn't take it as nasty I was more confused as I'd said the peadiatric dietician we see had recommended sustagen (kids or plus fibre) over pediasure. All good. Though in saying that at our last visit she said she would be see us for a year because I seem to know all the information she would give me anyway... we've been seeing one for 4 years though.

#22 Tesseract

Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:22 PM

Yeah my first thought reading your post was lactose intolerance and/or cows milk protein intolerance. But I figure this would have been one of the first things you tested? Could also be something more complex like fodmap.

His symptoms make it sound like he really is under eating. Healthy kids don't under eat - there is a reason for it. For some it's intolerance, or ASD or something else driving aversion, but there is a reason for it. I would be trying to get to the bottom of it rather than just trying to treat the symptom (under eating).

All the best, it can be tough. But there is more and more awareness these days.

#23 itsallnew

Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:28 PM

Just on the sustagen v pediasure question, nestle make a product called sustagen kid essentials that is a complete feed (like pediasure). It's different to regular sustagen.
Source: I'm a dietitian.

#24 RainbowDash

Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:49 PM

My little one doesn't have a very big appetite and is a slow eater. For school, I do a bento style lunch box with everything in bite size pieces so it's quicker to eat. Like most kids, they'd rather be playing!
With eggs, I would make an omelette using only egg yolk and cream.
Our dietician was really helpful in suggesting different things to try.

#25 BeStill

Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:55 PM

My son is the same. He is the same age and his BMI is 12 (3rd percentile is 14.5). It is so hard. We have been giving him potato gems with dinner every night for extra calories. I also cook everything in coconut oil or add olive oil. He likes Maccas chicken nuggets so I let him have them often (call the parenting police on me lol). He loves fruit too and chooses the lowest calorie option for everything.




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