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recovery from c section (planned) tips & questions!


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#26 Bird1

Posted 28 August 2017 - 02:30 PM

I wouldn't think you would have a problem 4 weeks post birth. I returned to full time work. But in all honesty no way would I have been apart from my baby for that long. Not to mention pumping takes work more work then feeding the baby

#27 PandoBox

Posted 28 August 2017 - 02:33 PM

thanks everyone... I think i'll push to move the appointment earlier even though they said they are booked out (someone may cancel?) and if i can't ill take her with me in the pram. There are no decent changing facilities but I can change her in the car.

Edited by PandoBox, 28 August 2017 - 02:33 PM.


#28 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 28 August 2017 - 03:14 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 28 August 2017 - 02:33 PM, said:

thanks everyone... I think i'll push to move the appointment earlier even though they said they are booked out (someone may cancel?) and if i can't ill take her with me in the pram. There are no decent changing facilities but I can change her in the car.

I would politely but firmly tell them they need to find space for you before your baby is born. Otherwise you might be spending a whole day with them with your boobs out and a screaming newborn! I don't think they really want a potentially screaming baby in their workplace all day.

#29 PandoBox

Posted 01 September 2017 - 12:30 PM

Ok so they gave me an option... I can go at 36 weeks to the appointment or with hub at 4 weeks old.. Im thinking 36 weeks is better.

#30 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 01 September 2017 - 12:55 PM

Yep I'd do 36 weeks

#31 anna_garny

Posted 01 September 2017 - 01:08 PM

definitely take the 36 week appointment!

Also one other thing that I haven't seen anyone mention - don't get a pedicure or if you do, opt for clear polish, because it'll get taken off anyway on your way into surgery - so they can check your toes for your oxygen flow.

I had to have black polish removed for my emergency c-section and they did it so roughly that I had black smears all over my feet for three weeks after - in January.

#32 Kattikat

Posted 01 September 2017 - 01:24 PM

Take bub with you and just feed on demand. I'm home after my elective c/s on Monday and I'm a bit sore but only taking 1 panadol/nurofen every 6 hours (or longer if I forget) and it's fine. Walked up to the shops and back yesterday, slowly but fine and also have a 2.5 year old who needs playing with. You'll be fine!

#33 Wango

Posted 01 September 2017 - 04:53 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 01 September 2017 - 12:30 PM, said:

Ok so they gave me an option... I can go at 36 weeks to the appointment or with hub at 4 weeks old.. Im thinking 36 weeks is better.

I went into spontaneous labour at 36 weeks, just make sure you have a back up plan just in case!

#34 redchick

Posted 01 September 2017 - 05:34 PM

Lots of great advice here. Just wanted to echo what a PP said about big undies. All the ones I had with me sat right on my banadage/incision - very uncomfortable! Also the hospital pads I used for the first 24 hours were huge - think surfboards. Wish I'd had the biggest pairs of granny undies I could find with plenty of spares in case of leaks!

I needed to use belly bands because my stomach muscles has separated so much. Get a physio to see you post partum to assess ad give you exercises.

All the best

RC

#35 a letter to Elise.

Posted 01 September 2017 - 05:44 PM



Two of my c sections were in the morning, and I had the cathedar out the next morning, and then the nurses helped me up to shower. As gross as the cathedar sounds, you cannot feel it, and when the spinal wears off, it helps not to have to move for that first day, while they get your pain management sorted. The night after the c section is a blur of morphine, trying to feed, weird pump things on my legs, and getting woken for obs. You don't want to have to worry about the toilet at that point!

I did with my first, but not the other two.

The nurses did a quick trim before mine - not of the whole area. I wouldn't bother shaving.

I struggled to get the recovery shorts on. They are very tight, and the incision was too painful wriggle them on. I would recommend physio or a personal trainer to get your tummy sorted afterwards instead.

It would be incredibly awkward trying to feed on the operating table. There is very little space, and you are lying on an angle. They will let you have a quick cuddle though. I had skin to skin in recovery and fed there instead. Much easier, as you may need quite a bit of help. You may be shaky, and you won't be able to sit up easily.

They will probably just give them to you on about day 3.

The first two weeks is the hardest, but there seems to be quite a lot of variance in pain for different people, so it's hard to know. My second was my best recovery wise. My first I was in quite a lot of pain for about 3 weeks, and it hurt getting in and out of bed for a few months.

I had my 3rd c section about 8 months ago. I still have some numbness and tender spots on my tummy. I had a couple of post operative infections, so the recovery took longer.

#36 PandoBox

Posted 03 September 2017 - 10:30 PM

Thanks everyone..


Was anyone else creeped out by the idea of a nurse changing /assisting with changing their pad and checking down there...how do they even do this neatly before I can get out of bed? Or do they wait till the next day when you're able to get up and shower? (assuming you can do that)


Hopefully it will be one of those things I won't really care about at that point in time.

#37 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 03 September 2017 - 10:58 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 03 September 2017 - 10:30 PM, said:

Thanks everyone..


Was anyone else creeped out by the idea of a nurse changing /assisting with changing their pad and checking down there...how do they even do this neatly before I can get out of bed? Or do they wait till the next day when you're able to get up and shower? (assuming you can do that)


Hopefully it will be one of those things I won't really care about at that point in time.

They are really professional, and you don't really care.

I once got stuck in hospital overseas, with a broken leg awaiting surgery, and got my period. I was relying on a bed pan, and the nurses' english was not great. That was not fun, but we muddled through.

That experience probably served me well for post-birth! Also, catheters are great, having them out not so much but it takes seconds.

#38 DaLittleEd

Posted 03 September 2017 - 10:59 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 03 September 2017 - 10:30 PM, said:

Hopefully it will be one of those things I won't really care about at that point in time.

Honestly, I can't even remember about pads before the catheter came out, no idea what happened. So yes I would say you won't care about it!

#39 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:01 PM

View PostDaLittleEd, on 03 September 2017 - 10:59 PM, said:

Honestly, I can't even remember about pads before the catheter came out, no idea what happened. So yes I would say you won't care about it!

I think they put absorbent sheets (like large pieces of paper, not full bed sheets) are used, so they just whip them out and replace them.

#40 DaLittleEd

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:01 PM

Actually, come to think about it, I think I was undie-less under the gown, with pad between my legs and a bluey under me - made it easy for the nurses to change. Oh so glamorous!

#41 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:08 PM

Yeah undies and a catheter don't go together.

#42 DaLittleEd

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:12 PM

And there I was vaguely entertaining the idea of having a second baby until I remembered this. :huh:

#43 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:15 PM

Ha! Less than 3 months to go here. And I was more worried about the newborn (or you know first 6 months +) sleep deprivation... The birth bit is so fleeting really.

#44 DaLittleEd

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:19 PM

View Post22Fruitmincepies, on 03 September 2017 - 11:15 PM, said:

Ha! Less than 3 months to go here. And I was more worried about the newborn (or you know first 6 months +) sleep deprivation... The birth bit is so fleeting really.

Yes, I was being rather facetious! The fact I could barely remember shows it didn't even rate, because newborn cuddles!

To even further derail poor OP's thread I am now wondering if we should do another meet up before your bub is due?

#45 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:25 PM

View PostDaLittleEd, on 03 September 2017 - 11:19 PM, said:

Yes, I was being rather facetious! The fact I could barely remember shows it didn't even rate, because newborn cuddles!

To even further derail poor OP's thread I am now wondering if we should do another meet up before your bub is due?

So tired from a busy father's day it didn't even register :doh:

I'd love another catch up!

#46 Lotsostorm

Posted 03 September 2017 - 11:41 PM

I have had 4 c sections.  My last was born at 9am, catherter and out of bed early the next morning.  I was always advised not to shave or wax, I think it's something to do with infection.

I never fed while being stitched up, your lying flat and attached to machines so it's too hard but always did in recovery.

I had fat ankles for a few days after surgery but never any other swelling.  I didn't use support garments but maternity pad is good to put over your cut under your undies for comfort.  I never used any stool softeners.

After my 4th I was back looking after 3 other young children, driving and doing everything else I would normally do after 1.5 weeks.  Unless you have complications you should be good to do most things after 4 weeks.

#47 PandoBox

Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:16 PM

View PostDaLittleEd, on 03 September 2017 - 11:01 PM, said:

Actually, come to think about it, I think I was undie-less under the gown, with pad between my legs and a bluey under me - made it easy for the nurses to change. Oh so glamorous!

So you just... lay there with no panties bleeding on a sheet :omg:

Well... that too shall pass right?

#48 DaLittleEd

Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:25 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 05 September 2017 - 09:16 PM, said:

So you just... lay there with no panties bleeding on a sheet :omg:

Pretty much. But it's an absorbent sheet. And you will likely not be able to feel it anyway because of the epidural.

#49 22Fruitmincepies

Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:27 PM

Oh you are numb down there and you have this tiny bundle in your arms/attached to your boob, so you don't care a jot!

#50 Paddlepop

Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:47 PM

View PostPandoBox, on 03 September 2017 - 10:30 PM, said:

Was anyone else creeped out by the idea of a nurse changing /assisting with changing their pad and checking down there...how do they even do this neatly before I can get out of bed? Or do they wait till the next day when you're able to get up and shower? (assuming you can do that)

I haven't had a C section but I did have a 4th degree tear and had a spinal block on top of my epidural for the stitching, so I was numb from my ribs down for about 12 hours, and couldn't move myself around at all. Obviously I had a catheter in, but I'd had that in since the epidural went in during labour.

The catheter didn't bother me at all. I couldn't feel it. It was actually kind of awesome to be able to drink as much water as I wanted without having to worry about having to pee. I was so thirsty after giving birth. I drank and drank and drank. My body was busy dumping pre eclampsia swelling in the 12-24 hours after delivery. Most of it was dumped via the catheter. The midwives had to change my catheter bag very frequently. So glad I didn't have to get up to pee for all of that. The catheter came out the next morning and was painless.

I can't quite remember what the arrangements were for a pad and bleeding while I was still numb but I think there was a pad placed between my legs, with a bluey underneath my bottom, and then a Connie/Kylie absorbent sheet over the bed sheet. I barely noticed the midwives checking and changing the pad and bluey. I was too busy looking at the beautiful creature in my arms, or in her bassinet, to care. The midwives were constantly doing obs on me and DD anyway, and checking the catheter bag, so it was just part of that. They were quick and discreet, and needed to check my bleeding to make sure the stitches were holding and that I wasn't haemorrhaging.

View PostPandoBox, on 05 September 2017 - 09:16 PM, said:

So you just... lay there with no panties bleeding on a sheet :omg:

Well... that too shall pass right?


Disposable sheet, but yes. Welcome to motherhood. Please leave your dignity at the door. You won't be needing that while you're in hospital. You'll never have had so many people interested in your vagina, bowels and breasts before. :grin:




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