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School for DD with GDD in Western Sydney


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#1 Steph19

Posted 17 June 2017 - 01:59 PM

DD has a global developmen delay and starts school in 2019. We were always going to send her to a local catholic but since the diagnosis things have changed. The paed and OT recommend Public and said she'll get way more funding. The catholic school has very little support.
I don't particular like our local public though and not sure how we'll go with an out of area enrollment. I have met with rhe councillor at the local publuc as they may get her an early intervention school readiness class once a week next year.

The school is pushing for me to enrol her in a special ed unit (IO class). I'm actually against it ans would prefer her in mainstream as she doesn't have behavioural issues, but would need an aide for her learning delays. Would I get a teachers aide if they only want me to send her into the special needs class?? Can I request this??
Also, as its a GDD, what if she eventually does catch up enough that her disability isn't recognised anymore?? Do they just move her into a mainstream class??

#2 José

Posted 17 June 2017 - 04:10 PM

Students in nsw public schools are not funded on the basis of GDD.
An IQ test would need to be administered or at least attempted. There can be different levels of delay with GDD.
With the mention of an IO class that suggests they are thinking your daughter may meet criteria for a moderate intellectual disability. Criteria includes IQ and an adaptive behaviour measure.
Students with a moderate intellectual disability are able to apply for funding in nsw public schools.
IF your child does have a moderate intellectual disability it's unlikely they would 'catch up' to their peers.
Whatever you decide, it doesn't have to be forever. You could try mainstream and if it isn't working apply for a support class then. Or you can start with a support class, if eligible, and if you aren't happy with that you can change back to mainstream at any time.
Hope that is helpful.

#3 MadnessCraves

Posted 17 June 2017 - 06:02 PM

I'd check with catholic schools if you're in NSW. My mum used to work for catholic Ed supporting children with disabilities, and worked very closely with students and getting them support for classes.

Now it's been a while, but I don't think that service has disappeared. I'd be having a look into it, the OT may not be correctly informed.

#4 WreckTangle

Posted 17 June 2017 - 06:39 PM

View PostJosé, on 17 June 2017 - 04:10 PM, said:

Students in nsw public schools are not funded on the basis of GDD.
An IQ test would need to be administered or at least attempted. There can be different levels of delay with GDD.
With the mention of an IO class that suggests they are thinking your daughter may meet criteria for a moderate intellectual disability. Criteria includes IQ and an adaptive behaviour measure.
Students with a moderate intellectual disability are able to apply for funding in nsw public schools.
IF your child does have a moderate intellectual disability it's unlikely they would 'catch up' to their peers.
Whatever you decide, it doesn't have to be forever. You could try mainstream and if it isn't working apply for a support class then. Or you can start with a support class, if eligible, and if you aren't happy with that you can change back to mainstream at any time.
Hope that is helpful.
hopefully my question will help the op if you know the answer to this. Where can one find the criteria that is used to determine who is accepted for funding for an ID?

#5 José

Posted 17 June 2017 - 06:47 PM

View PostWreckTangle, on 17 June 2017 - 06:39 PM, said:

hopefully my question will help the op if you know the answer to this. Where can one find the criteria that is used to determine who is accepted for funding for an ID?

As far as I know there isn't anything specific that's published about this.
In nsw public schools students with severe and moderate intellectual disability in mainstream school would get some level of funding.
A student with a mild intellectual disability would usually only get funding if they had additional disabilities impacting their ability to participate in schooling eg ASD, a mental health condition like anxiety, oppositional defiant disorder etc, or a physical disability.


ETA an adaptive behaviour measure like an ABAS would be necessary to demonstrate ID.

Edited by José, 17 June 2017 - 06:50 PM.


#6 WreckTangle

Posted 17 June 2017 - 07:36 PM

View PostJosé, on 17 June 2017 - 06:47 PM, said:



As far as I know there isn't anything specific that's published about this.
In nsw public schools students with severe and moderate intellectual disability in mainstream school would get some level of funding.
A student with a mild intellectual disability would usually only get funding if they had additional disabilities impacting their ability to participate in schooling eg ASD, a mental health condition like anxiety, oppositional defiant disorder etc, or a physical disability.


ETA an adaptive behaviour measure like an ABAS would be necessary to demonstrate ID.
the only information I found was as follows:
DET determines eligibility for PSD funding according to the following criteria:
A. Sub-average general intellectual functioning which is demonstrated by a full-scale score of
two standard deviations or more below the mean score on a standardised individual test
of general intelligence;
AND
B. Significant deficits in adaptive behaviour established by a composite score of two standard
deviations or more below the mean on an approved standardised test of adaptive
behaviour;
AND
C. A history and evidence of an ongoing problem with an expectation of continuation during the school years.

As far as how much funding, I haven't been able to find any information on that specifically.

ABAS would only be necessary if the iq is two standard deviations below average (for funding), in op's case she already knows that information I gather as there is a diagnosis?

I'm probably stating what you already know but it's helping me make sense of it all (going through the process ATM with my little one).

#7 WreckTangle

Posted 17 June 2017 - 07:51 PM

Ok I know I am posting a lot but this may assist with making a decision and I am leaning towards saying public is better for a number of reasons but I won't give them to you as I may be a bit pessimistic at the moment. I found a link and something stood out to me:

'Your child should get the support they need in school, whether or not they are eligible for extra funding. The education department says that the support they get should not depend on their level of funding.'

And the link to read is:

http://acd.org.au/ho...rks-in-schools/

If you go to the section in the above link titled 'What the extra funding can pay for', this may assist with your decision.

#8 José

Posted 17 June 2017 - 08:40 PM

View PostWreckTangle, on 17 June 2017 - 07:36 PM, said:



As far as how much funding, I haven't been able to find any information on that specifically.

ABAS would only be necessary if the iq is two standard deviations below average (for funding), in op's case she already knows that information I gather as there is a diagnosis?


You wont find specific information on how much funding.

The OP said their child has a GDD diagnosis. That's usually on the basis of something like a Griffiths.
A Griffiths is not an iq assessment.
The OPs child will most likely need an iq assessment prior to starting school to clarifying eligibility for support class or funding

#9 José

Posted 17 June 2017 - 08:44 PM

View PostWreckTangle, on 17 June 2017 - 07:51 PM, said:

Ok I know I am posting a lot but this may assist with making a decision and I am leaning towards saying public is better for a number of reasons but I won't give them to you as I may be a bit pessimistic at the moment. I found a link and something stood out to me:

'Your child should get the support they need in school, whether or not they are eligible for extra funding. The education department says that the support they get should not depend on their level of funding.'

And the link to read is:

http://acd.org.au/ho...rks-in-schools/

If you go to the section in the above link titled 'What the extra funding can pay for', this may assist with your decision.

That link looks like its a victorian site.  Some of the information does not translate to nsw.
There is a bit of variability beteen states.

However its true to say that schools should  make reasonable adjustments to cater for students whether or not additional funding is attracted

#10 Steph19

Posted 17 June 2017 - 11:07 PM

Thanks all. She does have a GDD based on Griffiths, but the local school have placed an "expiry" on this disability for the end of 2019.(I met with their councillor). This means she is already eligible to apply for the IO class for kindy. The school are actually encouraging it, but I don't really want to.
Some stage (either next yr if I decide or at least in 2019) she needs an IQ test. Paed said she's still too young but is high risk for an intellectual disability  (however no idea what!).
Still praying she manages to catch up somewhat.

#11 Steph19

Posted 17 June 2017 - 11:08 PM

By "Kindy" I mean first year of school as we are in NSW

#12 José

Posted 18 June 2017 - 01:13 AM

Ok.
So the current paperwork with the 2019 expiry could be used to apply for funding support or a support class.
You wont know the exact amount of funding support until you get feedback from the application.  Its up to the local school to do the application.
Support classes mean much smaller class sizes. This is more significant as students get older. In kindy in theory there is a cap of 20 students in a mainstream class by year 6 its 30 kids.
Support classes are not exclusively for those with behaviour problems.  
In this situation the school can make recommendations but the decision to go support class or mainstream is yours.

#13 HoneyMurcott

Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:18 PM

You'll need a Disability Confirmation which will 'classify' your daughter's disability. The school counsellor usually arranges this. Then the school will submit an Access Request. You will be looking for funding under the Integration Funding Support Program to support her in mainstream. The criteria is strict but the funding is there.
https://education.ns...funding-support

#14 José

Posted 19 June 2017 - 01:59 AM

View PostHoneyMurcott, on 18 June 2017 - 10:18 PM, said:

You'll need a Disability Confirmation which will 'classify' your daughter's disability. The school counsellor usually arranges this.

From the OPs posts it sounds like thats already been done

#15 WreckTangle

Posted 19 June 2017 - 07:35 AM

View PostJosé, on 19 June 2017 - 01:59 AM, said:



From the OPs posts it sounds like thats already been done
seems like that funding is only if you go to a public school. That's what I read in the link provided.




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