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Short stories for kids


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#1 Madammoselle

Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:56 PM

I'm after some short stories for my 11'year old dd. She's not a good reader and we haven't found a book or series she likes.
I'm looking for short stories to give her a sense of accomplishment in finishing a book.

#2 RynandStompy

Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:46 PM

I recall at that age (in the 80s)  liking a Scholastic book about Greek and Roman legends. They're all short stories, curated for child audience (therefore rapes and torture are sanitised right out) and interlinked. So reading a story one week could reference a character introduced the week before.
An added bonus for reading them also provides word history to the reader on where words and legends originate from. Even planet names*. And reruns of Xena would make more sense :D

I'm sure there must be similar books still published now?

*I was a nerd though who'd write out lists of the Greek pantheon names and then match to the Roman ones.



#3 Riotproof

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:25 AM

What is she into? It might be worth having a chat with a librarian.

At her age I was reading Judy Blume, babysitters club, a series about a rich girl with a horse Caitlin. Peter Hellier was on the radio talking about a book he's written for 8-12 year olds which did sound interesting, but I can't recall the title.

#4 Madammoselle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:46 PM

Thanks,
She hasn't found anything she really likes to read. We have lots Roald Dahl, tried goosebumps, Andy Griffiths, Enid Blyton.
She doesn't cope with small font, but the books with larger font are a bit young.
She likes dancing and animals. I have spoken to the local library but they weren't much help and only really had a few short stories available.
I will check out the suggestions 😀

#5 TequilaMockingbird

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:07 PM

Not short stories as such, but the Violet Mackerel series by Anna Branford and The Ella Diaries series by Meredith Costain are both shorter chapter books that are easily read, and really engaging.

The Ella Diaries have a bigger font than your standard book too, lots of illustrations as well.

#6 Riotproof

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:16 PM

She might like charlottes web? Anne of Green Gables?

#7 Rowenas Necklace

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:24 PM

Your comment about the text size makes me wonder if there's any issue with eyesight or slight dyslexia - is that something you've already ruled out?

Michael Morpurgo and Jackie French have some short novels that are lovely for children. They look and feel a bit more grown up than Andy Griffiths et al, so they might be a better fit for her.

I can't say the text size is particularly large, though you may be able to get large-text copies designed for students with vision problems somewhere.

ETA Jacqueline Wilson may be worth a look too - she doesn't write short stories, but from memory they do have larger text and have images within the story.

I'm surprised the librarians weren't more help, it may be worth checking out some local bookshops to find someone who can give good recommendations. All good bookshops should have at least one children's book expert!

You don't have to buy anything right away, just get some suggestions and then bring your DD in to see if any of them spark her interest.

Edited by rowenasnecklace, 21 March 2017 - 01:39 PM.


#8 unicycle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:34 PM

Arkie Sparkles is fantastic. There is not just text, but also all sorts of interesting graphics. This is a spunky girl who sets off with her female cousin to find her kidnapped parents. It is a series of 7 short books. High interest and easy to navigate.


Short stories, as such can be a bit of a pain as they are so dense with ideas, that you have to ay attention to each detail.

Even simpler and loads of fun is the Squeak Street Mice by Emily Rodda. Each story is about a different mouse living on the street. Easy to read but great stories.

Hope these help you.

If you need something shorter, there are wonderful picture books aimed at all ages. Would you like us to mention some of those?

#9 Madammoselle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:33 PM

View Postrowenasnecklace, on 21 March 2017 - 01:24 PM, said:

Your comment about the text size makes me wonder if there's any issue with eyesight or slight dyslexia - is that something you've already ruled out?

Michael Morpurgo and Jackie French have some short novels that are lovely for children. They look and feel a bit more grown up than Andy Griffiths et al, so they might be a better fit for her.

I can't say the text size is particularly large, though you may be able to get large-text copies designed for students with vision problems somewhere.

ETA Jacqueline Wilson may be worth a look too - she doesn't write short stories, but from memory they do have larger text and have images within the story.

I'm surprised the librarians weren't more help, it may be worth checking out some local bookshops to find someone who can give good recommendations. All good bookshops should have at least one children's book expert!

You don't have to buy anything right away, just get some suggestions and then bring your DD in to see if any of them spark her interest.

Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, she does wear reading glasses. We recently got a new subscription and she now wears multi focals. She has been issue with her eyes focusing at a different distance. It was our little love cal library, I will google some small independent book shops.

#10 Madammoselle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:37 PM

View Postunicycle, on 21 March 2017 - 01:34 PM, said:

Arkie Sparkles is fantastic. There is not just text, but also all sorts of interesting graphics. This is a spunky girl who sets off with her female cousin to find her kidnapped parents. It is a series of 7 short books. High interest and easy to navigate.


Short stories, as such can be a bit of a pain as they are so dense with ideas, that you have to ay attention to each detail.

Even simpler and loads of fun is the Squeak Street Mice by Emily Rodda. Each story is about a different mouse living on the street. Easy to read but great stories.

Hope these help you.

If you need something shorter, there are wonderful picture books aimed at all ages. Would you like us to mention some of those?

Thanks, these are all great suggestions.
We have heaps of picture books which she often reads. We do have a lot of books but I haven't been able to find the right one.

#11 Madammoselle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:41 PM

View PostTequilaMockingbird, on 21 March 2017 - 01:07 PM, said:

Not short stories as such, but the Violet Mackerel series by Anna Branford and The Ella Diaries series by Meredith Costain are both shorter chapter books that are easily read, and really engaging.

The Ella Diaries have a bigger font than your standard book too, lots of illustrations as well.

View PostRiotproof, on 21 March 2017 - 01:16 PM, said:

She might like charlottes web? Anne of Green Gables?

Thank you, all these suggestions have given me lots to look into. Sometimes I get stressed and panicked that she isn't getter better at reading. School work doesn't come naturally so it's always a struggle. You have all given me hope I can find something that she likes and she won't find it so hard. ❤


#12 all-of-us

Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:56 PM

My kids have dyslexia and it's a constant search for books.  I have found they enjoy audio books and also borrowing books that are on cd as well as the book to follow along with.  Barrington-stokes a UK publisher has dyslexia friendly books and a newsagent in NE vic has these stocked.  If your in Melb Moreland  library Is promoting it's easy to read books.

#13 unicycle

Posted 21 March 2017 - 04:25 PM

Graphic novels are another great way into fiction, except the font can be small. Amulet springs to mind as a fun story and it is a series.

#14 RSA

Posted 21 March 2017 - 04:35 PM

I remember as a kid reading books like

Unreal banana peel, all right vegemite

They had short, funny and a bit crude little rhymes in them. We've got them in the high school library for our year 7 reading program for some of our really ow level readers who are very disinterested in reading!

http://www.bookworm....1925386080.aspx

http://www.bookworm....1925386073.aspx


Not sure if that's helpful!

#15 chickendrumstick

Posted 21 March 2017 - 04:36 PM

Paul Jennings? The Un- series or Round the Twist books are short stories, some of them are a bit creepy or gross but great for stretching them a bit. Fun to read aloud too!

#16 AdelTwins

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:04 PM

Have you tried books on the iPad (or similar)? You can change the font type/size/colour easily.

#17 Mrs Lannister

Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:12 PM

View Postchickendrumstick, on 21 March 2017 - 04:36 PM, said:

Paul Jennings? The Un- series or Round the Twist books are short stories, some of them are a bit creepy or gross but great for stretching them a bit. Fun to read aloud too!

I was going to suggest Paul Jennings. Not short stories but quick books to read with lots of pictures is the WeirDo series

#18 TequilaMockingbird

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:39 PM

Oh, another suggestion- which again, is not a short story book, sorry!

I've had a lot of success coaxing reluctant readers with non-fiction books aimed at their interests, which they can read snippets of at first, and then often get drawn in and read 'just one more page'. Even books such as Ripley's Believe It Or Not can be great for that age group.

That said, tonight's Ella Diaries book was all about ponies, last night's was about dancing, and the protagonist is in 5th grade, so they really might be worth a browse. They've also encouraged the small child reading them to start a diary, which is helping writing skills, so win-win, that.

#19 oldone

Posted 21 March 2017 - 09:59 PM

Try Nanny Piggins. They're normal novel sized books, but it's broken down into chapters which are complete stories.

Diary of a wimpy kid is also mostly pictures but seems like a bigger book.

The Twits is a good one too, not too complex and lots of pictures to help keep her motivated.

I'd be wary of just giving her short stories as it might just reinforce to her that she's not a good reader and can't read 'real' books.

When we're reading more complicated or longer books, We take turns reading pages out loud to help keep DD2 interested and understanding the story without it being so exhausting for her. I'll often read two pages for every one of DD2's pages to keep her involved.

#20 TheFirstNoel

Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:14 PM

I would go for a kindle with whispersync, so she can read along with an audiobook and change the font size. That way she can fall in love with the story without so much of the work...
Something by DiCamillo always works here!

#21 Madammoselle

Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:15 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions.
I was thinking of getting a kindle app for the iPad, can you get lots of regular titles? Last time I looked for audio books or iBooks there was lots of made for iBooks.




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