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Breastfeeding advice in the Parents Room....


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#51 Future-self

Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:06 PM

Keep practicing being out and about OP and don't be afraid to just find a comfy spot to feed even if it feels out in the open once you've got a bit more confidence. I remember feeling ssooooo conspicuous the first few times with DS  like everyone could see and were watching. I soon realised that no-one was paying me any attention at all actually, they were involved in themselves. And that was with having to use nipple shields as well with DS!

I also only have had lovely comments from a few people in my years of breast feeding out and about whenever, wherever, never anything negative so don't be afraid.

#52 Kucingcantik

Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:24 PM

View PostPilar Palabundar, on 11 January 2017 - 06:51 PM, said:

I see your two guys using cubicle chairs and raise you a couple (sans child) walking out of a feeding cubicle in a busy Brisbane city parents room a couple of days before xmas.  Really, what the hell.

And then a complete douche canoe making two sets of parents wait at the Qantas club parents room as well before our flight home. Again sans child.

Talk about the silly season.

I've had a few like this too.

1. A couple trying to pierce their ears in a cubicle, covering it in blood.

2. Waiting for ten minutes for the toilet in the parents room (I was on my own with the pram and couldn't fit it into the regular toilets) only for a man who worked in one of the shops to wander out, leaving a disgusting smelling toilet.

3. Busting a security guard having a nap on the couch after the shops had shut!


I remember feeling like the cubicles should be for breastfeeding/pumping mums when my eldest was a  newborn. Mostly because I was having an awful time getting breastfeeding started and had to pump a lot - I couldn't do that in public, I needed the cubicle. If I was trying to get her to attach, it was hard work and I had to have my breast completely exposed. I wasn't comfortable with that and again needed a cubicle.  If they weren't available I felt like I couldn't feed when we were out. I used to feel very anxious leaving the house. I didn't understand why a formula feeder would need a cubicle. When she got a bit older and became distracted, I began to understand!

#53 Wolf87

Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:32 PM

I breastfed until 4.5 months, and once established I did it wherever I wanted. Including out for lunch with my FIL at a pub/restaurant, I just didn't GAF. Those early days I liked my privacy though, it was a military operation getting the latch right etc.
BFing got too hard so I changed to FFing, and hell I needed those feeding rooms. To get DD to feed in public I had to hold her at a specific angle, with absolutely no distractions. Even when someone would walk in the parents room she'd start turning her head round! It was a nightmare.
So to answer your OP, first come first served.

#54 Ellie bean

Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:38 PM

I know it's not everyone's experience but I was actually more self conscious when I had to switch to FF, than I had been BF, until I got used to it. The only negative comments I ever got in public were about FF (I'm not doubting though the judgment that some get for public BF and I'm very glad the law protects it).

#55 born.a.girl

Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:56 AM

View PostFuture-Xmas-elf, on 11 January 2017 - 08:06 PM, said:

Keep practicing being out and about OP and don't be afraid to just find a comfy spot to feed even if it feels out in the open once you've got a bit more confidence. I remember feeling ssooooo conspicuous the first few times with DS  like everyone could see and were watching. I soon realised that no-one was paying me any attention at all actually, they were involved in themselves. And that was with having to use nipple shields as well with DS!

I also only have had lovely comments from a few people in my years of breast feeding out and about whenever, wherever, never anything negative so don't be afraid.

I never had anything negative, either, and did plenty of public feeding - didn't do the shawl thing, however, my daughter latched easily and didn't gaze around mid feed, and I also have small breasts, so less flesh to be exposed.  Fashion trends over the decades can help or hinder, too.

I was once sitting on a low artificial garden wall in a shopping centre feeding, and a man came walking along, looked at me the way you do when you're just gazing, not actually 'looking' then he registered what I was doing, gave me a smile and looked away quickly.

#56 Seven of Nine

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:10 AM

Me neither, nothing negative.

I remember being approached by a woman about 30 years older than me who said when she was a new mum she was asked to leave when she breastfed her baby in the spot I was feeding. She was lovely. Said it was nice to see that things had changed.

Edited by Seven of Nine, 12 January 2017 - 10:11 AM.





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