Jump to content

Moving year 7 into secondary school


  • Please log in to reply
90 replies to this topic

#51 somila

Posted 13 August 2016 - 03:53 PM

I don't think worrying about your child being ready for high school is being precious anyway.  It is a very different environment from primary school.  But, generally, things have gone pretty well in QLD, as far as I can work out.

I meant even more multi-storey buildings, Expelli.  That is what has happened here.  Demolition of older buildings to make way for new buildings with even more classrooms on a similar footprint.

And yes, some former primary teachers have gone to Junior Secondary, teaching the same class groups for at least two subject areas.

This has been great, from my perspective, a nice transition from working with one teacher (+ music and P.E.) teachers in primary school, to 6 or 7 teachers in the old FYOHS.

Paying for that extra year of private HS has been a strain for some families, however.

Edited by somila, 13 August 2016 - 03:57 PM.


#52 Heather11

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:14 PM

Quote

Paying for that extra year of private HS has been a strain for some families, however.

For us will mean we will have three at HS instead of 2 as DD would have lalready finished year 12 the year my youngest would have started in year 8.

#53 liveworkplay

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:25 PM

View Postunicycle, on 13 August 2016 - 03:30 PM, said:

Do their Clas teachers go with them into the high schools and they follow the same curriculum as when they were in primary school? What then happens for specialist teachers? Do they find themselves at both the high school and primary, or with less works. I am beginning to see how complex this can all become.
How can you adequately present the grade 7 AC without specialist teachers? no matter what the setting.

#54 born.a.girl

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:26 PM

View PostLesley225, on 13 August 2016 - 03:47 PM, said:

Would it not have been 1st form then?  When I went into year 7 it had only changed from 1st form a couple of years before.  This was in the middle late 70s in NSW.

What was the reason for year 7 being in primary ( and when i was in primary it was def 6th class - not sure when it changed) in SA and other states?

Yes, first form, but used 'today's language' as I thought it was more appropriate.


I didn't even realise until my friend's daughter in SA was doing the transition to secondary that this happened in SA.

#55 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:28 PM

View Posthills mum bec, on 13 August 2016 - 03:41 PM, said:

I don't think anybody is saying it isn't a good idea and doesn't make sense.  I'm certainly not saying my precious DS/DD is too young to be in high school in year 7.  My biggest concern is the logistics of the change.  Public schools are so severely underfunded as it is (especially the high schools), I don't know where the money would come from to fund this.  Would the benefits of having year 7s in high school outweigh the monetary expense?  I'm not a teacher so I don't know a lot about the problems of delivering a year 7 curriculum in primary school but I'm not sure if it's worth the cost.  If it's not broken then why try to fix it?  The whole "other states do it, so should we" is not a good enough justification.
Re infrastructure the Science curriculum in particular is difficult to deliver in a primary school without science labs etc. But more than that a primary school teacher is a generalist teacher and the curriculum is markedly different in terms of content, specialisations and expected outcomes in Year 7 as it was written by and for secondary teachers to deliver and facilitate. Primary school generalists often do not have the requisite skill to deliver it. A 6/7 class is more challenging as the differences between the two year levels is wider than gaps between other year levels.

A primary school, generalist teachers and primary school facilities are simply not adequate to deliver a full Year 7 curriculum IMO. I would argue that it is, in fact, 'broken'.

#56 somila

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:31 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 13 August 2016 - 04:25 PM, said:

How can you adequately present the grade 7 AC without specialist teachers? no matter what the setting.
My kids' large primary used the multiple classroom teachers as specialist teaches when necessary (i.e. one would teach all classes science, another taught History etc.).  Music and PE specialists are standard. Art was outsourced - we paid a small fee.

#57 Heather11

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:49 PM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 13 August 2016 - 04:28 PM, said:

Re infrastructure the Science curriculum in particular is difficult to deliver in a primary school without science labs etc. But more than that a primary school teacher is a generalist teacher and the curriculum is markedly different in terms of content, specialisations and expected outcomes in Year 7 as it was written by and for secondary teachers to deliver and facilitate. Primary school generalists often do not have the requisite skill to deliver it. A 6/7 class is more challenging as the differences between the two year levels is wider than gaps between other year levels.

A primary school, generalist teachers and primary school facilities are simply not adequate to deliver a full Year 7 curriculum IMO. I would argue that it is, in fact, 'broken'.

Yet if you listen to the Education Minister Susan Close she states that the AC for year 7 is written in a context that it can be taught in either a PS or HS setting.  Of course she is not at the front line.

I know at the Catholic PS my youngest attends they set up a dedicated science room for classes to use for science lessons.  This may have be done to help with the requirements to deliver the science curriculum in year 7.

#58 Expelliarmus

Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:52 PM

Susan Close isn't a primary school teacher ...

#59 Dionysus

Posted 13 August 2016 - 05:03 PM

View PostHeather11, on 13 August 2016 - 04:49 PM, said:



Yet if you listen to the Education Minister Susan Close she states that the AC for year 7 is written in a context that it can be taught in either a PS or HS setting.  Of course she is not at the front line.

I know at the Catholic PS my youngest attends they set up a dedicated science room for classes to use for science lessons.  This may have be done to help with the requirements to deliver the science curriculum in year 7.

I quite like Susan Close (since I watched her absolutely hammer C Pyne in a speech once - it was glorious!), but yeah, she would say that ^^^. They aren't prepared to fund it yet. Will watch the CEO do it and in a few years time the commentary will be different

#60 A NEW HOPE

Posted 13 August 2016 - 05:24 PM

I can't see it changing anytime soon. The educations system is so full and clogged up and there is no funds to fix it as it is far less change the system. In my area there are strict no children outside the catchment but 1 of the catchment schools is so full that high school students are having to travel up to 30 minutes to get a school place elsewhere. We have to consider maybe moving house for the children to even get a high school place. Putting year 7's into high school will make the problems even worse.

#61 SusanStoHelit

Posted 13 August 2016 - 05:53 PM

Just on the why other states had yr 8: in Queensland our kids were on average one year younger than the same year level in nsw or Victoria. Our yr 12s were turning 16 turning 17, and yr 8 12 turning 13. So having yr 7 in high school would mean a whole year level of mainly 11 year olds, quite a bit younger.

When Qld introduced prep the cutoff changed, so now our students are on average 6 months younger than their counterparts in other states. As pp have said, most will turn 12 by June.

I teach yr 7 science, and they do seem awfully young to me. But I do take the point about resources: our year 7 cohort do not have a full science lab as the school simply didn't have enough. I teach in a pseudo lab which can be limiting in terms of experiments at times, but suited to the level of the students.

#62 somila

Posted 14 August 2016 - 01:42 PM

I think a similar thing happened in WA, PP.

#63 TKS

Posted 14 August 2016 - 05:04 PM

Go back far enough in QLD, year 8 used to be in primary school, it was fairly common not to go onto high school at all. My baby boomer mother did year 8 in primary (1963 I think)and went from there to secretarial school. The year 8s must have seemed huge compared to yhe grade ones.

#64 purplekitty

Posted 14 August 2016 - 05:19 PM

My brother and sister did Yr. 7 and 8 in primary school in Vic. before it changed.
Uni High started at Form 3 when I started high School in Yr. 7(Form One).

#65 Heather11

Posted 10 June 2018 - 03:19 PM

View Postmitts, on 11 August 2016 - 09:43 PM, said:

I believe the 2018 date was a commitment from the Liberal govt if they won the last state election (which they didn't).

Reviving an old thread.

And now that the Libs are in office it looks like they are going to follow through on their promise.

They are hoping to have it rolled out by 2022. A leader at the school I work at reckons both year 6 and 7s will graduate from PS at the end of 2020.  

Looks like the Liberal Government are going to use the previous Labor Governments funding to schools to help with building requirements at the high schools.

#66 A NEW HOPE

Posted 10 June 2018 - 04:17 PM

View PostHeather11, on 10 June 2018 - 03:19 PM, said:



Reviving an old thread.

And now that the Libs are in office it looks like they are going to follow through on their promise.

They are hoping to have it rolled out by 2022. A leader at the school I work at reckons both year 6 and 7s will graduate from PS at the end of 2020.  

Looks like the Liberal Government are going to use the previous Labor Governments funding to schools to help with building requirements at the high schools.

i still don't see how this will help schools like Mark Oliphant.

#67 Heather11

Posted 10 June 2018 - 04:23 PM

View PostA NEW HOPE, on 10 June 2018 - 04:17 PM, said:

i still don't see how this will help schools like Mark Oliphant.

The Labor Government did have another Super School in Munno Para on the agenda.

#68 A NEW HOPE

Posted 10 June 2018 - 04:32 PM

View PostHeather11, on 10 June 2018 - 04:23 PM, said:



The Labor Government did have another Super School in Munno Para on the agenda.

Libs scrapped it

#69 Expelliarmus

Posted 10 June 2018 - 05:30 PM

I suspect they will spruik Botanic High as a problem solver ...

#70 A NEW HOPE

Posted 10 June 2018 - 05:41 PM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 10 June 2018 - 05:30 PM, said:

I suspect they will spruik Botanic High as a problem solver ...

that will help the suburbs how?

#71 Expelliarmus

Posted 10 June 2018 - 06:12 PM

I'm not saying it will.

But they will say it will.

Trickle down probably.

In reality it won't help the northern suburbs. The schools it will relieve pressure on are Norwood Morialta, Glenunga, Marraytville and Adelaide Highs.

Saying that will relieve pressure on Roma Mitchell and Mark Olipant doesn't actually make it so.

But they will say it ...

#72 A NEW HOPE

Posted 10 June 2018 - 06:24 PM

We live 1 street over from Mark Oliphant. My son is 11 and been on the waiting list since birth, we still have no answer.

#73 Expelliarmus

Posted 10 June 2018 - 06:39 PM

Which school are you zoned for then?

#74 A NEW HOPE

Posted 10 June 2018 - 06:48 PM

View PostExpelliarmus, on 10 June 2018 - 06:39 PM, said:

Which school are you zoned for then?


mark Oliphant

#75 bikingbubs

Posted 10 June 2018 - 06:50 PM

If you are zoned then they have to accept you




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.