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Moving year 7 into secondary school


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#1 Heather11

Posted 11 August 2016 - 07:57 PM

*Posted in SA Forum*

Received confirmation yesterday that if we continue with Catholic Education my youngest will be moving to secondary school as a Year 7 in 2019.

From 2019, in the Catholic system year 7 will be the first year of secondary schooling.

I know there have been rumblings around for a few years that public schooling would also be looking at this option too.  From my little bit of research, including consulting with staff at the school I work at, I haven't managed to find any confirmation that this is occurring.

I actually read a post on FB a while ago where poster mentioned that her child's school principal had said year 7 was moving to high school in 2018.

I know that not all the students from my DS's Catholic Primary School move onto Catholic High Schools.  In 2019, when the school becomes an R-6 school, it may mean those students will have to move to a public PS for year 7 if they too haven't made year 7 a part of high school.

So has anyone heard anything more concrete as to whether the government is looking at following suit?

Edited by Heather11, 11 August 2016 - 08:10 PM.


#2 Lees75

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:03 PM

A lot of the private schools in SA have already done it.

There has been rumblings for a while about the public system doing it, to line up with the other states, national curriculum, etc.  But I don't think many of our public high schools actually have the room, which is why it is rumblings and nothing concrete at this stage, as far as I know.

Edited by Lees75, 11 August 2016 - 08:23 PM.


#3 Mrs Claus

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:05 PM

What year is it currently?

(I'm in Victoria and year 7 has always been the first year of high school)

#4 SeaPrincess

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:08 PM

In WA, all schools have made the change. Most high schools (both public and private) keep the year 7s fairly segregated. At our primary school, the year 6s and 7s in the final year did everything together, then the following year in year 7 and8, they were kept completely apart, which they found difficult, but I don't suppose that's so much of an issue now.

#5 Veritas Vinum Arte

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:08 PM

Year 7 always been first year of highschool for both NSW and VIC since at least the 1980s

#6 Heather11

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:09 PM

View PostMrs Lannister, on 11 August 2016 - 08:05 PM, said:

What year is it currently?

(I'm in Victoria and year 7 has always been the first year of high school)

In SA primary school is Reception to Year 7.  HS is Year 8 to 12.  

I know a lot of R-12 schools have moved year 7 across already or to what that they call 'middle school' being year 7 to 9.

ETA:  I have made an edit to my first post so that people are aware this is posted in the the SA Forum.

Edited by Heather11, 11 August 2016 - 08:11 PM.


#7 ~J_F~

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:14 PM

It has to happen due to the Aus curriculum and whats expected in grade 7. Im surprised they are waiting so long to do it.

Qld has just done it and god people whinged about it.

Didnt worry me as growing up in another state grade 7 was always been the first year of high school.

#8 Dionysus

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:15 PM

I have 2020 in my head for some reason. May have read it.

I teach in an R-12 school and we moved yr 7 to the high school campus 4 yrs ago

SA's big problem in no space in high schools and LOTS of small primary schools that will get smaller and struggle.

So, between now and then I would say expect to see a few more amalgamations.

A birth to 12 amalgamation is about to happen near me.

Edit: Am in the state system

Edited by Dionysus, 11 August 2016 - 08:16 PM.


#9 Heather11

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:17 PM

View PostLees75, on 11 August 2016 - 08:03 PM, said:

A lot of the private schools have done in SA have already done it.

There has been rumblings for a while about the public system doing it, to line up with the other states, national curriculum, etc.  But I don't think many of our public high schools actually have the room, which is why it is rumblings and nothing concrete at this stage, as far as I know.

Yes, I had only heard rumblings too.  This is why when I saw someone post about it actually happening in 2018 I thought I had missed the memo.  LOL.  The poster was actually questioned by several others as to whether she was correct but she reaffirmed the information had come from the principal.  I can't remember if she mentioned the school and I don't remember which one it was anyway.

#10 Lees75

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:26 PM

Well, if there was a memo, I missed it too!!  And my DD will be due to start Yr 7 in 2019.

#11 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:28 PM

I've heard nothing in the state system but I did know aft catholic ed in 2019.

Can't happen soon enough imo

#12 StringArt

Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:35 PM

We changed over 2 years ago here in QLD and my kids school was a similar situation to what you describe OP. They switched over a year before the state schools (so 3 years ago). Most kids stayed with their class group and completed year 7 at the high school campus, and then moved to different high schools for year 8 (the official year everyone swapped over). It seemed to work out ok.

#13 psuedo nim

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:26 PM

If year 7 goes to secondary  school then what happens with oshc? I gather  from other threads that you aren't legally allowed to leave 12 year olds unattended -but i also understand sa kids are a fraction younger starting school due to different cut off dates, and the fact that you are only allowed 1 yearof kinder here.

#14 just roses

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:32 PM

As PPs have said, Qld has already done it.

I did Year 7 at high school in the ACT so it doesn't bother me. Also, my kids are at a P-12, so not such a big issue.

Here, I understand the state high schools have done a lot to accommodate the younger students. One friend who is a high school principal was looking at the idea of staggering lunch so that the youngest kids had limited contact with the oldest kids. Not sure what ended up happening, but I know a lot of thought went into making sure the Year 7 kids were well looked after.

#15 KrisMs

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:34 PM

Slightly off topic but NSW here and eldest child did first year of high school (yr 7) as a 12 yo.  Was 11 and turned 12 in the feb of yr 7.  

Obviously no Oosh/oshc but I guess we had the benefit of planning and knowing that she would be getting the bus home to an empty house and letting herself in and we worked towards that in her last year of primary.

Edited by KrisMs, 11 August 2016 - 09:35 PM.


#16 ~J_F~

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:36 PM

View Postpsuedo nim, on 11 August 2016 - 09:26 PM, said:

If year 7 goes to secondary  school then what happens with oshc? I gather  from other threads that you aren't legally allowed to leave 12 year olds unattended -but i also understand sa kids are a fraction younger starting school due to different cut off dates, and the fact that you are only allowed 1 yearof kinder here.

They wont have it.

The only state with the 12yo thing is Qld and it also states for an unreasonable amount of time without reasonable provisions, which is subjective and very unlikely you would get in trouble for a kid in high school being at home alone.

#17 Heather11

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:37 PM

View Postpsuedo nim, on 11 August 2016 - 09:26 PM, said:

If year 7 goes to secondary  school then what happens with oshc? I gather  from other threads that you aren't legally allowed to leave 12 year olds unattended -but i also understand sa kids are a fraction younger starting school due to different cut off dates, and the fact that you are only allowed 1 yearof kinder here.

There is no actual legal age where children can't be left alone as taken from

The Parent SA website:

Quote

There is no specific law that states at what age you can leave children alone. But the law is clear about the responsibility of parents to look after their children:
  • Parents are expected to provide food, clothing, a place to live, safety and supervision. (Family Law Act)
  • Parents can be charged with an offence if children are left in a dangerous situation and are not fed, clothed or provided with somewhere to live. (Criminal Law Consolidation Act)
  • The Police or Families SA (part of the South Australian Department of Families and Communities) can remove children from situations where their safety is in serious danger and there is no guardian present. (Children’s Protection Act)
When a person under the age of 18 years – for example, an older brother, sister or teenage friend – cares for children, the question of negligence or liability could arise. As a parent you might be held responsible for the carer, as well as your own children, if something goes wrong. A carer who is still legally a child – that is, under 18 years – would not be judged against the standards of responsibility expected of adults.

A couple of hours before or after school would not be seen as failing in providing safety and supervision.

#18 mitts

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:43 PM

I believe the 2018 date was a commitment from the Liberal govt if they won the last state election (which they didn't).

#19 annodam

Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:49 PM

I don't get what the issue is though?

Yr 7 has always been High School age around my parts, didn't know it was any different, to be honest.

#20 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:02 PM

It isn't High School in SA though and moving it to High School has significant implications for the logistics of it all. It's still an issue here.

#21 liveworkplay

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:08 PM

Yesr 7 has always been part of high school in Tas. I can't imagine, given the curriculum, being able to fulfil all criteria without having the resources of a high school or at the very least, a middle school model.

#22 Lees75

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:12 PM

View Postliveworkplay, on 11 August 2016 - 10:08 PM, said:

Yesr 7 has always been part of high school in Tas. I can't imagine, given the curriculum, being able to fulfil all criteria without having the resources of a high school or at the very least, a middle school model.
Our school runs a middle school model for Yr 6 and 7s. 3 composite classes that are then streamed for English and Maths. Works well.

ETA - no extra resources though!

Edited by Lees75, 11 August 2016 - 10:12 PM.


#23 Expelliarmus

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:20 PM

It is difficult to run AC Yr7 in a Primary school, yes.

#24 kpingitquiet

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:35 PM

Our public school has already told us it's definitely happening for us but our principal is not a big fan as she still sees quite childlike personalities in the year 7s. I have a bit of an ideological issue with it as I'm the product of a primary-middle-secondary system where various selected grades of 5-9 are in a school separate from either little or big kids. My particular district had K-4 in neighborhood primary schools, 5-6 at a separate upper primary campus unifying several neighborhoods, then those same kids went to a middle school campus for 7-8, then a final move to high school for 9-12.

Middle school has its positives and negatives. My stepfather was a middle/high-years guidance counsellor for a few decades and often felt the K-7 and 8-12 model was better as isolating middle grades tends to result in heightened behavioral issues (fights, bullying) due to the concentration of adolescent developments occurring for the entire school. I personally have issues with the 18 drinking age meaning club-going young adults are in school with pre-teens. But I've been told I am in the minority for thinking this is a bad idea.

#25 Heather11

Posted 11 August 2016 - 10:40 PM

View Postannodam, on 11 August 2016 - 09:49 PM, said:

I don't get what the issue is though?

Yr 7 has always been High School age around my parts, didn't know it was any different, to be honest.

Up until 3 years ago there were three states where year 7 was still in PS.  I know hard to believe that there are other parts of Australia other than NSW and Vic.

Of course there are going to be issues with the change.  Accommodating anything up to an extra 100+ students.




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