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Question on private midwife in brisbane


20 replies to this topic

#1 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:04 PM

Hi

I'm weighing up my options on whether to go public or private and came across this option of having a private midwife. I just don't know how it works.

I want to go to Brisbane Mater Mothers hospital as its the best closest hospital to where I live and work.

I have already looked at private OB options but this seems like a viable option also.

So would I just go through the public system but have a private midwife through the whole process and after birth?

How do I find one? How much would it cost?

Any help would be appreciated

Thanks
J

#2 Pinky101

Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:13 PM

Hi Jit7,

If you go public, you don't "usually" have a private midwife. Although if you go through a public midwifery practice, you might get a certain number of post-natal home visits from the midwife. My SIL, who birthed at the Mater, had this.

I think if you're in the catchment for the Mater, you would be eligible for this too.

Obviously, you can choose to hire your own private midwife if you want, but it is absolutely not compulsory and I would say not even that common with women I know who have gone public.

I don't live in Brisbane, but recently did my Calmbirth course through a doula connected with The Midwife Clinic.
Her website is www.themidwifeclinic.com.au

From what I understand, you can choose what sort of services you want the midwife to provide e.g. just ante-natal or post-natal, care up to the point of heading to hospital, or also care at the hospital (although a private midwife would only be there as a support person). Or everything.

Once you get some names, maybe try calling a few and see what services they offer.

Best of luck

Edited by lucky 2, 16 September 2014 - 04:51 PM.
r/o comment about a registered health professional as per the EB forum rules


#3 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:20 PM

Thanks Pinky101

Yes I think I am in the catchment area for Mater and I believe they have a midwifery team (i think).

I just thought instead of paying for an OB I would quite like a DOula or IM that supports me throughout the whole pregnancy. I will have a look at the website you have given and give them a call.

All of my family are on the other side of the world so it would be good to have someone to contact throughout to ask questions or whatever. I understand that the IM can only support in the hospital but it may be what I need.

Thanks again

J

#4 Pinky101

Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:45 PM

No worries.

I had DD while we lived in Germany, so completely understand how scary it can be when the system is so different from what you are used to.

#5 Soontobegran

Posted 16 September 2014 - 03:14 PM

Hi there, I am in Vic but I think the same thing applies  up there but you can not use a public hospital with an unaffiliated private midwife in labour or for post natal care.
You can have one as a support person or a doula for the same purpose but they can not make medical decisions for you.
I am not familiar with the ante natal care at the Mater but there is probably a midwifery led care clinic at which you will be cared for by midwives and hopefully build up a rapport which will give you some continuity of care.
I'd check their website and see if they have a model of care that suits you.
All the best.



#6 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 03:45 PM

Hi thanks for your reply

I have read that the IM can only support during birth and not offer any medical assistance. I just thought they would be useful for pregnancy and after care.

At mater there is a Midwifery Group Practice which is what I am going to find out about.

I am seeing my GP tomorrow so hopefully she can also advise. My concern is the doc seems to be pro private care but I want all my options on the table.

#7 Soontobegran

Posted 16 September 2014 - 03:53 PM

View PostJit7, on 16 September 2014 - 03:45 PM, said:

Hi thanks for your reply

I have read that the IM can only support during birth and not offer any medical assistance. I just thought they would be useful for pregnancy and after care.

At mater there is a Midwifery Group Practice which is what I am going to find out about.

I am seeing my GP tomorrow so hopefully she can also advise. My concern is the doc seems to be pro private care but I want all my options on the table.


I'd just make sure you let your GP know that you are interested in learning about about all models of care but that you are interested in the MGP.
Hopefully he/she will be helpful.

#8 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 03:55 PM

I hope so too

It's nice to have options but confusing too

#9 Pinky101

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:01 PM

Here is some information from the Mater website. It appears that if you choose the Midwifery Group Practice, you can only stay up to 6 hours post-birth. Your other options are:

- GP shared care (where you see your GP for most of your appointments);
- public obstetric care, where you go to the hospital for most of your appointments - you wouldn't consistently see the same person, but may do
- private obstetric care - where you pay but get to see the same person

http://www.matermoth...-maternity-care

#10 lurfest

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:10 PM

I had my daughter this year at the Mater.  I  read the page Pinky101 quoted.  I wanted to stay longer than 6 hours if I felt like I needed it, and I wanted drugs, so I went for shared care.

Later on in my pregnancy my doctor dropped the ball, and there were a few issues that went unchecked between my GP and Mater check-ups.  The midwives scolded me and told me to go to the midwives clinic for the next one, to ensure continuity of care.  When I told them I chose the shared care route because I didn't want to leave after 6 hours, and I wanted drugs, they were quite surprised, and told me I would not have been kicked out, and I was welcome to whatever drugs I wanted!  Man, I was annoyed...

#11 Pinky101

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:14 PM

View Postlurfest, on 16 September 2014 - 04:10 PM, said:

I had my daughter this year at the Mater.  I  read the page Pinky101 quoted.  I wanted to stay longer than 6 hours if I felt like I needed it, and I wanted drugs, so I went for shared care.

Later on in my pregnancy my doctor dropped the ball, and there were a few issues that went unchecked between my GP and Mater check-ups.  The midwives scolded me and told me to go to the midwives clinic for the next one, to ensure continuity of care.  When I told them I chose the shared care route because I didn't want to leave after 6 hours, and I wanted drugs, they were quite surprised, and told me I would not have been kicked out, and I was welcome to whatever drugs I wanted!  Man, I was annoyed...

Oh wow Lurfest, I would be really annoyed too!

OP, maybe it would be worth calling the Midwifery Group Practice to get more information too.

#12 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:20 PM

Oh dear lurfest - i would be really annoyed with that

Good to know they wouldn't have kicked you out though

I will definitely be giving them a call

Apart from that how was your experience at Mater?

#13 Jit7

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:22 PM

Thanks pinky101 for that information

Edited by Jit7, 16 September 2014 - 04:23 PM.


#14 IamtheMumma

Posted 17 September 2014 - 09:11 AM

www.mymidwives.com.au

You can have continuous care from a private midwife if she/he has a visiting agreement with the Mater. My Midwives have this agreement with a number of hospitals. However you are a considered to be a private patient.

The general gist is you see the midwife at their clinic or your home for all your antenatal appointments. You attend the hospital for OB appointments once a month if needed. When you go into labour, you ring your midwife and she/he comes with you to the hospital where you give birth. Your midwife is your primary carer. The hospital does not provide a midwife for you but you have access to all of the hospital's facilities including the drug cabinet.  You are a private patient and will be charged for the use of the room on top of the midwives fees. I don't know the Mater's fees but you can easily ring up and ask.

After birth, you go home. For a normal birth, I think you're expected to go home within 4-6hrs.  There is a 6 week post natal care package where your midwife will come to your home or you can go to the clinic.

There are medicare rebates for some visits and part of the birth but no rebates for the hospital fees unless you have PHI. The cost is individualised to meet your circumstances but is around the $3500-4000 over the course of the pregnancy. If you chose to have a home birth, its a bit more.

If your labour doesn't go as planned and you require an emergency c-section, you are discharged as a private patient and entered as a public patient. You won't be charged for the c-section as its covered by medicare. Your midwife can still be with you during the c-section. I don't think the fees alter for the midwife but there isn't a medicare rebate for having a private midwife at a c-section (that I know of - happy to learn otherwise).

I love having an independent midwife. Mine is worth every cent - more actually.

Edited by AnonMumma, 17 September 2014 - 09:14 AM.


#15 Jit7

Posted 17 September 2014 - 09:42 AM

Thanks Anonmumma - that's really helpful

#16 LottieCait

Posted 17 September 2014 - 09:52 AM

Another option is if you choose to go public with the Mater MGP, is to have a student midwife who will follow you throughout your pregnancy, birth and postnatally.  They are there to support you and to extend their learning.

#17 Jit7

Posted 17 September 2014 - 10:02 AM

I was just talking about that with my husband last night LottieCait.

I was reading the Doula and Midwife page on here yesterday as saw the threads on students asking pregnant mothers to be involved in the process. There were mixed reviews but on the whole people had a good experience. I guess that is another point of call and support.

#18 Laura_Doula

Posted 05 October 2014 - 09:30 PM

As a doula, I can say that we are there with you throughout your pregnancy and birth.  We don't have shift changes so even if your labour is long we'd be there with you the whole time.  There's also post natal support as well.  Having a midwife and doula would give you the best of both worlds; medical support from the midwife and emotional support from your doula.

#19 lucky 2

Posted 05 October 2014 - 10:21 PM

Quote

medical support from the midwife and emotional support from your doula.   
A mw provides midwifery support which of course includes emotional support. How could it not?
  

Quote


Key midwifery concepts that define the unique role of midwives:
  • partnership with women to promote self-care and the health of mothers, infants, and families;
  • respect for human dignity and for women as persons with full human rights;
  • advocacy for women so that their voices are heard;
  • cultural sensitivity, including working with women and health care providers to overcome those cultural practices that harm women and babies;
  • a focus on health promotion and disease prevention that views pregnancy as a normal life event.
http://www.internati...of-the-midwife/

#20 Bluemakede

Posted 05 October 2014 - 10:48 PM

Independent/private midwives cannot give medical care at the mater (actually I think it's in all hospitals in queensland), as in you cannot hire a midwife and then use them to give birth in hospital, they don't have hospital birthing rights, they can though give support during pregnancy, labour and post natal visits (or can be used for home birth). There is a clinic in new farm I believe that offer good packages for this type of service.

The mater have 2 good options for continuity the first being the midwifery group program, you see your midwives, 3-4 per group, and one of them will attend you in labour, depending who is on. The other is their clinic, you can choose to see 1 midwife for all your appointments, they don't however attend you in birth, you're assigned to whoever is on.

I went with the 2nd option, I saw the one midwife throughout my pregnancy, and then I had 2 midwives during labour (one for an hour and a half, the other till I gave birth and was transferred to the ward). I had never met those midwives before, but they were both fantastic.

Personal preference, but it was in the catchment, so I preferred to just go public, couldn't fault them.

#21 mellifluous

Posted 05 September 2018 - 09:53 AM

My midwives have an arrangement with the rbwh and you can give birth there with a my midwives private midwife. I did this for my first and I’m in the mater mgp for my second.



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