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All sorts of wrong what do you think about preschool tutoring?


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#1 Tomate1910

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:18 PM

A friend of mine just showed me this piece about parents enroling their little ones in preschool tutoring.

http://m.smh.com.au/...0201-31tx4.html

Coming from a background where school starts at 6 or 7 I find this all utterly absurd...

I especially find the view of this 'experienced teacher' appalling!!!

"''As an experienced teacher, I felt children were coming into kindergarten class not as prepared,'' Ms Galic said, noting the play-based emphasis of preschool education. ''The incidental learning of preschool means children have had no experience of structured learning when they get into a classroom.''

That is what school is for you silly lady. Were those normal little kids making your job at as a kindy teacher too hard? Or did you just want to pull money out of anxious parents pockets... What a load of BS!!! Sorry this gets me really riled up...

Edited by Tomate1910, 02 February 2014 - 01:46 PM.


#2 EsmeLennox

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

Coming to kinder not as prepared for what? I do think it's good for kids to have some exposure to pencils, scissors, gluing, books, etc as 'school readiness', but anything else, nope.
Her comments are absurd. Kids shouldn't have to start school knowing to sit in a structured classroom.

The world has gone mad. Or more specifically, parents have gone mad.




#3 FeralZombieMum

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:30 PM

It might bite some parents on the bum as the kids could become extremely bored in FYOS and they might even have behavioural issues due to the boredom.

#4 BadCat

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

That makes me angry.

What the hell is wrong with people?

#5 capper

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

I think that sort of thing is standard in some parts of Sydney.  It doesn't stop there.  The kids attend after school classes until they finish high school.

#6 MarigoldMadge

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

my aunt tutors 3 yos upwards at one of the major tutoring firms in Melbourne - she thinks all the parents are nuts and doesn't think what she's doing is any more than an involved parent couldn't do, but as she says, sometimes a parent and their money are easily separated...

#7 Sockergris

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

I think that kind of thing is only going to become more and more prevalent.

Once some kids start doing it other kids' parents worry that their kids are going to be left behind.  The whole parent guilt thing in combination with parents wanting their kids to get into the best schools.  You just have to read the threads about selective high schools to see it's already happening. Our society is becoming more and more competetive.

However, we have a long way to go before we get to the likes of Singapore, Japan or Korea.

Makes me sad.

#8 loubee

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:35 PM

I read that to and thought how ridiculous.  Kindy is about learning boundaries and instruction,  preparing them for school readiness you don't stick them in tutoring for that.

#9 Kay1

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:38 PM

I have one child who started school as a fluent reader (very motivated self taught) and if anything it was a disadvantage. He was bored and the teacher found it difficult to accommodate him.
I have another starting tomorrow, he can't read but he has picked up a good basic knowledge of letters, sounds etc and thanks largely to his 'play based' preschool he will enter school with confidence, excellent social skills and strategies, self management abilities and a sense that school and learning can be fun. A perfect school preparation if you ask me.

I'm not a teacher but if I was I imagine I would be rather embarrassed for the teacher in that article. IMO these tutoring businesses take advantage of parents' anxieties.

#10 WaitForMe

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:49 PM

Next we'll have tutoring to prepare for kinder...

#11 JAPNII

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:54 PM

Part of me thinks this is redic, the other part wonders how we are going to lift our numeracy and literacy world ranking....

#12 Sockergris

Posted 02 February 2014 - 01:55 PM

Don't forget birth tutoring for the smart modern day fetus. (Where IS that sarcasm font?)

#13 Fizgig

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:01 PM

If a kindy teacher doesn't understand that her job is to help children become acclimatised to the school setting then she is not going to be a very good kindy teacher.

I do think that some of this comes from the number of children who now attend day care before starting school. They learn a lot there about following the routines of the teachers/carers, listening to instructions, sitting at tables, working on activities etc. The children who don't attend do not necessarily get this input and it can look like some children are more "advanced" than others when they have just had a different experience.

#14 FeralProudSwahili

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:03 PM

Absolutely ridiculous.

Why do our world rankings have to improve?

#15 Elizabethandfriend

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:03 PM

I didn't do any pre-school tutoring but I am so relieved that my daughter entered school already reading.  The literacy program at her local primary has bern hopeless - the majority of kids are not reading at the end of prep and are well behind.  So part of me understands why parents would want an insurance policy and kids do have more time and energy in preschool than in school....

#16 FeralProudSwahili

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:04 PM

Kids aren't meant to know how to read by the end of prep.

#17 caitiri

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:07 PM

I can understand why this exists.

DS was in 4yo kinder last year,  over the course of the year we watched his confidence deteriorate to the point he would no longer pick up a pencil/paintbrush.  He didn't recognise numbers and letters he had known in 3yo kinder.  
THe kinder environment/ groupp dynamic/ teaching style/ personality interaction was disasterous and if we could of afforded some one on one or small group tutoring to help prepare him for school we would have jumped at the chance.  Nothing to do with making him the best and the brightest but giving him some confidence.

#18 ACO

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:10 PM

The way I read the article is that some parents have been sending their preschoolers to Kumon. CRAZY!

Then the article focuses on one particular woman, a qualified teacher who opened a school readiness company. To me this is different to tutoring. I see it as a service that could help nudge some preschoolers who are struggling to be ready for the first year of school through the normal course of their early childhood education.

#19 Heather11

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:11 PM

View PostFizgig, on 02 February 2014 - 02:01 PM, said:

If a kindy teacher doesn't understand that her job is to help children become acclimatised to the school setting then she is not going to be a very good kindy teacher.

I do think that some of this comes from the number of children who now attend day care before starting school. They learn a lot there about following the routines of the teachers/carers, listening to instructions, sitting at tables, working on activities etc. The children who don't attend do not necessarily get this input and it can look like some children are more "advanced" than others when they have just had a different experience.

In SA you would be hard pressed to find many children who haven't attended preschool (referred to as kindy in SA).  It is heavily subsidised by the govt. and in low socioeconomic regions can cost as little as $50 a term.

In NSW is seems to be much different where you are still paying daycare equivalent fees to attend preschool.

#20 Elizabethandfriend

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:12 PM

View PostSwahili, on 02 February 2014 - 02:04 PM, said:

Kids aren't meant to know how to read by the end of prep.

Ummmm says who?  State benchmarks is level 5 by the end of prep.

#21 FeralProudSwahili

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:18 PM

Yeah level 5 is very basic. I find it hard to believe the majority of kids would not have reached that level after a year.

Edited by Swahili, 02 February 2014 - 02:21 PM.


#22 ImpatientAnna

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:20 PM

View PostElizabethandfriend, on 02 February 2014 - 02:12 PM, said:



Ummmm says who?  State benchmarks is level 5 by the end of prep.
In NSW the independant reading level at the end of fyos is meant to be around 8.  There are many who are much higher though.

#23 qak

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:20 PM

View PostTomate1910, on 02 February 2014 - 01:18 PM, said:


"''As an experienced teacher, I felt children were coming into kindergarten class not as prepared,'' Ms Galic said, noting the play-based emphasis of preschool education.

I think this is due mainly to parental expectation ...

... but I agree that there is a big gap between "play-based learning" as in LDC & pre-school (I think it is EYLF? Happy to be corrected) and they get to FYOS and there is the expectation that they might be able to write their name, count to 20, know the alphabet etc. (as well as being able to sit down, focus on the teacher, follow instructions, complete tasks and so forth).

I fear that tutoring is rote learning .. not a great way to encourage an interest in anything!

Have there been any studies of "success" (however defined) after years of schooling & tutoring?

#24 Heather11

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:21 PM

View Postcredence, on 02 February 2014 - 02:10 PM, said:

The way I read the article is that some parents have been sending their preschoolers to Kumon. CRAZY!

Then the article focuses on one particular woman, a qualified teacher who opened a school readiness company. To me this is different to tutoring. I see it as a service that could help nudge some preschoolers who are struggling to be ready for the first year of school through the normal course of their early childhood education.

Yes I agree.  School readiness is totally different to tutoring.

To me school readiness involves being able to recognise your name, unpack/pack up their bag, eating at particular time, following instructions and routines.  The ability to transition from one activity to another, lining up and walking properly as a class.  Able to hold a pencil and scissors and recognise some but not all letters and numbers.

Being able to read before school and being tutored in order to be able to do is different altogether.

#25 EsmeLennox

Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:23 PM

View PostJAPN2, on 02 February 2014 - 01:54 PM, said:

Part of me thinks this is redic, the other part wonders how we are going to lift our numeracy and literacy world ranking....

What's wrong with our ranking?




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