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How many weeks do they perform an elective c section?


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#26 Soontobegran

Posted 29 November 2013 - 04:52 PM

View PostHolidayromp, on 29 November 2013 - 07:21 AM, said:

  Some obs actually prefer CS over vaginal births!

Just need to address this.
I have never ever met an Obstetrician who prefers to scrub and perform a C/S in favour of a uncomplicated vaginal delivery.

Some may prefer to do a C/S if there is what they believe to be a risk to the mother or the baby but aside from that it is really an inaccurate claim.

#27 karkat

Posted 29 November 2013 - 04:53 PM

DD1 was born at 38+5 was meant to be at 38+2 except everyone involved forgot that there was a new dental surgery list being done on that day at our local hospital (only 1 theatre).

This was almost 5 years ago, when I was having DD3 last year I was told if I elected for a c/s it would be in the 39.

#28 robhat

Posted 29 November 2013 - 04:56 PM

As others have suggested, it's usually 39 weeks, sometimes 38 weeks but it depends on each pregnancy and the medical factors involved. In the public system it is more likely you'll get booked in at 39 weeks. If you have a private ob the timing sometimes gets shuffled a bit depending on your doctor's schedule.

And I would like it to be noted that recovery from an elective c-section is a very different matter to recovery from emergency c-sections. I didn't experience half of what the PP posted. In fact my recovery was better than most people I know, including those who had vaginal births. In fact the biggest hurdle I had was dealing with the lack of stomach muscles which was going to happen no matter how I birthed!

#29 Soontobegran

Posted 30 November 2013 - 08:24 AM

View Postrobhat, on 29 November 2013 - 04:56 PM, said:


And I would like it to be noted that recovery from an elective c-section is a very different matter to recovery from emergency c-sections. I didn't experience half of what the PP posted. In fact my recovery was better than most people I know, including those who had vaginal births. In fact the biggest hurdle I had was dealing with the lack of stomach muscles which was going to happen no matter how I birthed!

Actually this is very true for many people.
I know several women ( my DD being one) who've had a vaginal delivery then a C/S who would or do deliberately choose an elective C/S for a subsequent pregnancy due to the faster recovery and less pain.
Many times I have seen far more extensive surgery performed on a perineum including the anus, the vagina, the clitoris,the labia and the urethral orifice which has required more suture material and time than a C/S closure.

The notion that C/S always = horrendous and Vaginal = easy is just not the case and we really have no right to comment on whatever choice a mother may make.

#30 Sandy1902

Posted 30 November 2013 - 11:57 AM

I've gotten told they won't do them before 39 weeks unless there is medical problems etc.

#31 Always amazed!

Posted 30 November 2013 - 12:23 PM

My ob usually aims for 39 weeks.

MIne will be at 38 weeks due to SROM with y last 2 at 36 weeks and 38 weeks.

#32 Ritaroo

Posted 30 November 2013 - 12:26 PM

View Postsoontobegran, on 30 November 2013 - 08:24 AM, said:


The notion that C/S always = horrendous and Vaginal = easy is just not the case and we really have no right to comment on whatever choice a mother may make.

Thanks STBG. I was upset by a pp who implied that if we went for a selective c section instead of vbac, we weren't trying hard enough. My go at a vaginal birth ended with the words "his heartbeat is dropping" which I never want to hear again in my life. I went in for an emergency c section and everything was fine but my desire to go straight for a c section next time shouldn't be met with try harder or get another dr.

#33 Lady Door

Posted 30 November 2013 - 12:37 PM

My c-section for my second child was going to be performed at 40+1 (my first child I had a vaginal delivery at 41+4) because it wasn't definitely decided on until quite late in the piece. Luckily an opening came up and it happened at 39+1.

#34 Kreme

Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:32 PM

I had my first elective c section at 39.5 wks, my second at 37 wks 5 days.

I'm happy to forego my medal for "at least attempting" a VBAC. My recoveries were great both times and babies were healthy.

#35 Mummy_Em

Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:45 PM

View Postsoontobegran, on 30 November 2013 - 08:24 AM, said:

Actually this is very true for many people.I know several women ( my DD being one) who've had a vaginal delivery then a C/S who would or do deliberately choose an elective C/S for a subsequent pregnancy due to the faster recovery and less pain.Many times I have seen far more extensive surgery performed on a perineum including the anus, the vagina, the clitoris,the labia and the urethral orifice which has required more suture material and time than a C/S closure.

This is almost exactly my experience. I don't know exactly how long I was in theatre after my vaginal birth, but I think it was about 3 hours. I only got to hold my baby for about 2 mins before theatre, so she had a long wait for her first feed (I know not all babies feed straight away, but I had GD and was worried about her BSL) Recovery was awful.

For myc-section I would have been in theatre or 40 mins and I was able to sit down on the loungeroom floor a week later, while my dd1 and my niece decorated the Christmas tree. Oh, and my dd2 fed as I was being stitched (and has been obsessed with food ever since!)

I have read that elective c-sections from 39 weeks is current best practice (barring medical reasons to do it earlier, of course.)

Edited by Mummy_Em, 30 November 2013 - 01:48 PM.


#36 Justaduck

Posted 30 November 2013 - 01:56 PM

View Postrobhat, on 29 November 2013 - 04:56 PM, said:

And I would like it to be noted that recovery from an elective c-section is a very different matter to recovery from emergency c-sections. I didn't experience half of what the PP posted. In fact my recovery was better than most people I know, including those who had vaginal births. In fact the biggest hurdle I had was dealing with the lack of stomach muscles which was going to happen no matter how I birthed!

Yes mine too :) I was surprised that I was up showering with no issues the next morning, but the Mum we met at antenatal class who had a straightforward vaginal birth needed a shower chair and assistance. Prior to that I thought for sure I would be the one needing help.
I've been told the recovery can be easier for an elective c-sec as you are only recovering from the surgery, whereas if the call is made after you have been labouring for a while/pushing you are recovering from the ordeal of labour as well as surgery.

#37 whale-woman

Posted 01 December 2013 - 01:33 PM

I third the positive post C/s recoveries mentioned. I was in the shower and then down getting real coffee at the cafe in the hospital the day after my c/s. My midwife was pretty amused as apparently the VB ladies hadn't managed to be coaxed to even get out of bed yet.

#38 OneMore?

Posted 01 December 2013 - 01:47 PM

My #2 and #3 were booked in for 38+2 and 38+3 and both times i went into labour beforehand. #1 was an emerg c/s after he refused to come out even though I was fully dilated.

My kids are now almost 5, 7 and 9 - and I never get asked if they were born naturally or via c/s. Surprisingly you can't tell the kids in their classes that were born via c/s :smile:

#39 Duck-o-lah

Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:13 PM

Quote

My go at a vaginal birth ended with the words "his heartbeat is dropping" which I never want to hear again in my life. I went in for an emergency c section and everything was fine but my desire to go straight for a c section next time shouldn't be met with try harder or get another dr.

I liked it, but just had to bold this and agree! Sounds like my experience was similar.

OP, my hospital books elective CS's no earlier than 39 weeks, good luck :)

#40 siemp

Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

Mine is booked for 37.5 - my OB does not want to risk natural labor at all.

It took many years of therapy to get over DS's birth, and related trauma. No way am I going to take those risks or let someone else make judgement calls like that again with my body or my baby EVER again.

#41 Charmzy

Posted 10 December 2013 - 09:44 AM

At my hospital without complications they like to do electives 39+ weeks, not uncommon to be booked 40-41w and they will just do an emergency csect if mum goes into labour before then.

In saying that my 3 elective csects (csect #3, #4, #5) one was performed at 38w and they felt that was too late so the next was performed at 37w, they still felt that was too late so wanted to do the 5th at 36w but I pushed to make it 37w1d and they agreed.   I however had a host of complications and multiple csects so that is why mine were done earlier.

Edited by Charmzy, 10 December 2013 - 09:45 AM.


#42 American-Pie.

Posted 11 December 2013 - 01:04 PM

Mine was 39+3 with my first, and this baby will be 39+3 again :)

Private hospital first time round, elective ( I was only 16 and this was a contributing factor in my OB's decision ) I was very very happy with the decision and the outcome.

Public Hospital, second time round, elective again. Very happy once again as I really really really do not want to have a natural birth.

#43 Tigerdog

Posted 11 December 2013 - 01:12 PM

I didn't think you could have an elective c-section if a public patient - here in ACT you can only elect for one if there's deemed to be a risk.  But once there is a risk it swings way in the other direction, ie. I had an emergency c-section with DS1, when pregnant with DS2 they let me try for a v-vac but booked the c-section a few days before the due date - and you guessed it, no baby so I had to have the op.  They also won't induce after someone's had a previous c-section but I think that's pretty much the norm everywhere.

#44 Katie_bella

Posted 11 December 2013 - 01:20 PM

I think everyone should leave their opinions and birth experiences out of this discussion. The OP didn't ask for all the stories and boasting about recoveries from either CS or VB's.

OP the public hospital I work at, books in woman for elective CS's between 38 and 39 weeks, but you have every right to ask to wait longer if you wish and it fits in with the availability of your OB and theatre space.

#45 Tinky Winky Woo

Posted 11 December 2013 - 01:43 PM

My second was a medically needed C-section but is called elective.  It was done at 39.6 weeks and they would of left me longer if they had a choice.

There are a lot of women who can not have VB babies due to many medical reasons and there is no way anyone else should judge them.  Especially other women and people who have no idea of the persons background or medical issues.  This is why C-sections are seen as 'failing' by so many people when they are nothing like failing.

#46 Stronger

Posted 11 December 2013 - 03:54 PM

My first was an emergency c-section and my second was booked in for 39 weeks and 3 days but I went into labour at 39 weeks exactly and ended up with an emergency c-section at 39+1 anyway (at a public hospital in Perth SOR) so if there is ever a number 3 I will be requesting it for about 38 weeks!

Good luck OP!!

#47 Duck-o-lah

Posted 13 December 2013 - 11:39 AM

Quote

I didn't think you could have an elective c-section if a public patient - here in ACT you can only elect for one if there's deemed to be a risk
I had elective an CS in the ACT public system, no risks in that particular pregnancy.

Edited by duck-o-lah, 13 December 2013 - 11:39 AM.


#48 TracyWS

Posted 16 February 2014 - 02:24 PM

My obstetrician has said that she will aim for 38 weeks, but I may need to go earlier at 37 weeks as there were some problems in my last pregnancy. I think most will aim for at least 38 weeks for elective CS as long as no problems arise.




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