Jump to content

Public vs private hospital debate
Just some interesting stats on public vs private


  • Please log in to reply
113 replies to this topic

#26 Wigglemama

Posted 08 July 2013 - 11:50 PM

QUOTE (lucky 2 @ 09/07/2013, 12:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know pooks, I live in Melbourne and work in the industry so I know what (or where) you are talking about.
I don't care if women take up private health insurance and use it for maternity care.
But I will defend the quality of public care when I know that it does in fact exist.
And I will speak up if I think that private maternity care is being presented as the only way to get quality care.
I hate zoning and the lack of choice it has brought to women in some areas.
I hope the hospitals that are not meeting the needs of women keep getting complaints and improve.

I think this really needs repeating.

As a midwife, I have worked in both public and private sectors. Both have their pros and cons.

However to state that the reason why women choose private health care is because most public hospitals give poor care( yes someone did state this in this thread when the op stated she had a great experience) is really unfair.

I have worked in three public hospitals and two private hospitals. Tbh, the facilities were "prettier", the equipment newer and the food was better in the private hospitals by a long shot, but the quality of care, in my experience, with the many midwives, ob regs and ob consultants that I know plus the capacity of care the public hospitals could manage compared to private hospitals, was and is head and shoulders above.

I don't care if women want to book into private facilities or choose intervention.

However, it isn't health care that everyone can access. Our public system is strained but it isn't all crap. The option that we have that all women can access can provide and provides as well as it can.

#27 fidodido

Posted 08 July 2013 - 11:51 PM

I've had 4 public hospital births. Stayed in for between 5 and 3 days and never shared the 4 bed room for more than 1 night each time.
I had my own Obstetric GP see me throughout the pregnancy and every day in hospital for the first 3. #4 I saw 4 different Drs only because DS decided to come a bit late and the Dr had just left on holidays.

I'm pretty relaxed though and really didn't care who I saw although I really like my usual Dr. All deliveries ended up as midwifed only in attendance. All of which were lovely, helpful and supportive.


#28 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 09 July 2013 - 12:21 AM

You know, when you say it isn't "all" crap, it doesn't fill me with confidence.

Some of it is crap. Absolute bollocks.

I don't think public is crap. But sometimes it is. Often it seems to depend on the person you get looking after you in the lottery. Sometimes the overall culture of the hospital sucks the proverbial.

I don't think public often gives women enough choices. Actually I don't think there are enough choices overall.

Wanting continuity of care and control of birth choices (ie. elective caesarians, home birth) is seen as an optional extra that is reserved only for those who can afford private care/home birth. I disagree with that, I see it as a miserable failure on the part of the public system.

Public hospital staff can pat themselves on their backs all they like about how good *some* of them are... You know, depending where you live and which care team get assigned to you on the day...

But it doesn't change the fact that women are being denied choices, and some are getting substandard care, and told to be grateful for it.

Screw that for a joke.

#29 savannah_8

Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:37 AM

i completely agree with you but I just wanted to show the statistics as I thought they were interesting to say the least, there's no need to be rude.   I think all women should have the birth they aspire to whether public or private and im not basing my experience on everyone, i just wanted to state that not all public stories are scary, but I know im the majority.  I think increasing the continuity of care to patients is a step in the right direction








QUOTE (Ehill @ 08/07/2013, 10:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OP - you are basing ONE experience (being your own) and comparing it to the stats of an entire country.  Every birth is different, every womans expectations are different.

Why do we have to have this argument (sugarcoated as a 'discussion) over and over again as to whether women have drugs or no drugs, cs or vb or vbac, forceps or no forceps, midwife or OB.....it is not your business what other women choose.  Nor is it my business what you choose.  

My choices were very different to yours, but they are that.....MY choices.  And none of your business.

Edited by savannah_8, 09 July 2013 - 04:46 AM.


#30 savannah_8

Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:40 AM

QUOTE (Sunnycat @ 08/07/2013, 11:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't particularly like the public hospital I'm giving birth at but also don't like the private hospitals on offer here in WA either. We wouldn't ever be able to afford to go private anyway.

There just seems to be no middle ground. I really wanted to give birth at the Birth Centre, but last time when pregnant with ds due to medical reasons couldn't (I can't fault the public care I received for the actual induction but can fault it for the medical care leading up to the induction). I was lucky enough to be transferred back to the BC afterwards and that was a lovely experience.

This time I again wanted to birth at the BC but am 1 BMI point over their maximum, so transferred out to a completely different hospital to try and get a water birth. The doctors I have met have sucked so far. I much prefer midwifery care.

Really I wish there were more Birth Centre type options to birth at and more room for negotiation rather than just blanket rules and bans.

If we have another child I'm not sure what I would do but can see why women resort to home births and free birthing as the gap between private and public is just too vast (IMO).

ETA: I don't aspire for a natural birth anyway, all I want is to feel supported and listened to and understand what is going on.

Edited by savannah_8, 09 July 2013 - 04:51 AM.


#31 MummaDiva

Posted 09 July 2013 - 06:11 AM

I went public, will defend the concept of good quality health care for all until the cows went home, but my birth experience sucked.  The midwives were totally uninterested in being of assistance.  I was discharged despite voicing concerns about bleeding, and ended up back in ED a few nights later hemorrhaging.  Again, cursory look over by a disinterested doctor (first one i had seen in that hospital) then sent home.  Admitted a few days letter with a pretty severe infection.
Do I think the care would have been better in a private hospital?  Probably not - I don't think medical personnel really care about their patients.  It's just about going through the motions - there's no passion there.

#32 Brownbear

Posted 09 July 2013 - 06:21 AM


I had my baby in a large public hospital by choice (I didn't want to pay for it) and it ended up being an excellent choice, because things turned pear-shaped very suddenly and the anaesthetist, obstetric consultant and paediatric team were all right there at the hospital and got the baby out safely within about 20 minutes.

In a private hospital, these people need to be called, hence there is a delay.

I am going public again this time, because I feel much safer knowing that there is a Paediatric team right there should there be any problems with the baby.

I am doing shared care with my GP, so get fantastic continuity of care.

Last time, I did share a room with another lady for four nights, and the hospital stay wasn't particularly pleasant, but I was given the same essentials that you get in private (pain relief, education, medical assistance when needed).

Other people are obviously keen to go private, and they are lucky that they have enough money to pay for it if that's what they choose to do. However, unlike many other countries in the world I think we are so lucky to have a public health system (albeit one that's underfunded) and don't think it deserves the bashing it gets.





#33 TillyTake2

Posted 09 July 2013 - 06:43 AM

I'd love to know where all these wonderful public hospitals are. In my area there are 3 public hospitals, all zoned. One has no on site obs at all (& there was a recent post on here from a woman who's bub almost died as a result). All have a 48hr max stay for first time mums & 24hr for subsequent. None will see you for any care prior to 16-20 weeks (therefor relying on Gps who may or may not be experienced in managing any early pregnancy complications. 2 offer 4 be rooms, one used to offer 4-6 (!!) bed rooms but now has been refurbished & offers mostly single or double rooms (admittedly the facilities here are actually very nice...unfortunately the level of care/support is not so nice).

I have personally worked in one of the maternity units & it is telling that many of the midwives & all of the Drs chose to have their own babies elsewhere wink.gif

So I guess in my experience, in a wealthy, well kept area of a huge capital city the public maternity care is SERIOUSLY lacking.

Eta: of my 4 local friends who had first babies in the local public hospital, 3 out of 4 chose to go private the second time. Many of my other friends are planning the same (but haven't had 2nd bubs yet). I think that is also telling. 2 of them took out private cover after the births specifically so they could go private the next time.

Edited by TillyTake2, 09 July 2013 - 06:47 AM.


#34 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 09 July 2013 - 07:00 AM

Tillytake2 the midwives I know who work in private hospitals have all ended up going public and some have said they would never give birth at their respective hospitals. I don't really think its an indicator of anything other than their preferences, I don't think it's a reflection on the private or public system as such.

Most of my friends who have given birth in public hospitals have been happy with their experience in WA but I know their expectations and desires were vastly different to mine.

I don't think the public hospitals here in WA are bad it's just not the kind of care I'm after. I suspect it varies state to state and what type of care you are after. Like I said up thread I prefer midwifery led care personally. There just doesn't seem to be many options unless you can "afford" to pay extra.

Edited by Sunnycat, 09 July 2013 - 07:05 AM.


#35 a letter to Elise.

Posted 09 July 2013 - 08:57 AM

My local public hospital is excellent,but it is also the busiest maternity ward in Sydney. Birthing there would likely mean a short stay and sharing a room - both things I didn't want. I was nervous, and wanted to ensure I had some privacy post birth, so I went private. I have no doubt I would have received adequate care at the public hospital, but probably would have been less comfortable.
My only concern with some public hospitals is the short stay some insist upon, which I don't think is supportive of breast feeding, especially for first time mums. A lot of people i know switched to formula very early on, as they had a lot of trouble feeding, and had no support as they'd already left the hospital when their milk came in. I think there should be the option to stay until feeding is established if that's what you want to do.

#36 Wigglemama

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:00 AM

I think some of you are missing the point I was trying to make here about the public system. I realise that it doesn't provide all choices for all women but it is fair for what it can provide.

At the end of the day, endless choices cost money and this issue is not exclusive to maternity care. How many vents do we see on here about children that are on waiting lists for non urgent care or one particular single mum who had to scrape together the money for dental work that her child's development depended on, but was still seen as not vital enough to be performed within six months?

Don't criticise maternity staff about these issues or claim they don't care enough because they do and many of them ate tired of it, jaded, exhausted, stressed. My work place isn't even allowed to employ a full time staff member because of funding cuts to our region, despite our units only having 25 permanent staff members, doing round the clock shift work to keep the place running and to keep our women safe. We only have something like 200 births a year but if we cut our services more and not replace staff to cope with the numbers we do have, the service is finished. That is more choice lost for women.

And for whoever said medical personnel don't care enough, I dare you to say that to any shift worker in a busy public hospital. I can say with absolute conviction that you have absolutely no understanding of how hard(yet rewarding) the work of any health care worker can be but trust me when I say, we are under resourced.

Edited by Wigglemama, 09 July 2013 - 09:01 AM.


#37 Gumbette

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:13 AM

QUOTE (Brownbear @ 09/07/2013, 06:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I had my baby in a large public hospital by choice (I didn't want to pay for it) and it ended up being an excellent choice, because things turned pear-shaped very suddenly and the anaesthetist, obstetric consultant and paediatric team were all right there at the hospital and got the baby out safely within about 20 minutes.

In a private hospital, these people need to be called, hence there is a delay.


Um, no.  My OB was present at my birth, he requested I ring the hospital when I was on my way.  He was there when I arrived for both my births, the first was at 5.30 am the second at 7.00 am.  I didn't have an epidural the first time as it was too quick, the second time, as soon as I requested pain relief the  anesthetist was there within 10 minutes - and that was only because it was an out of hours call out, otherwise he would have already been at the hospital.  Most OB's have their rooms on the grounds of the hospitals so are there during the day.  I'm not sure where you're getting your information from.  I love all the generalisations from people about private hospitals that have never given birth in one.

Edited by TiredbutHappy, 09 July 2013 - 09:14 AM.


#38 knottygirl

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:26 AM

I also think a better statistic would be % of women who requested an epidural who were denied it.

Most of my friends who went public had nothing but horror stories of their experience.  Quite a few asked several times for an epidural but were told no one was available or that they didnt need it.  I also know of friends who were overdue, and begging to be induced but the public hospital refused.  One had severe back pain for 2 weeks, couldnt walk, was having sporatic contractions, and not able to sleep at all.  Eventually when she got to 42 weeks they finally agreed to induce her.  



#39 Gumbette

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:27 AM

QUOTE (TillyTake2 @ 09/07/2013, 06:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'd love to know where all these wonderful public hospitals are. In my area there are 3 public hospitals, all zoned. One has no on site obs at all (& there was a recent post on here from a woman who's bub almost died as a result). All have a 48hr max stay for first time mums & 24hr for subsequent. None will see you for any care prior to 16-20 weeks (therefor relying on Gps who may or may not be experienced in managing any early pregnancy complications. 2 offer 4 be rooms, one used to offer 4-6 (!!) bed rooms but now has been refurbished & offers mostly single or double rooms (admittedly the facilities here are actually very nice...unfortunately the level of care/support is not so nice).

I have personally worked in one of the maternity units & it is telling that many of the midwives & all of the Drs chose to have their own babies elsewhere wink.gif

So I guess in my experience, in a wealthy, well kept area of a huge capital city the public maternity care is SERIOUSLY lacking.

Eta: of my 4 local friends who had first babies in the local public hospital, 3 out of 4 chose to go private the second time. Many of my other friends are planning the same (but haven't had 2nd bubs yet). I think that is also telling. 2 of them took out private cover after the births specifically so they could go private the next time.

My friend gave birth at the public hospital near you the first time.  They had no beds available even though her waters had broken, and sent her home with some antibiotics - only for her to turn around and come back again after an hour.  After her birth she lay on the delivery bed for 45 minutes waiting for stitches.  She was pressured to leave after 24 hours (first time mum) due to the lack of beds, with the promise of at home visits from a midwife that never eventuated.  She couldn't breastfeed, and with no help, all she could do was put cold cabbage leaves on her breasts to stop the pain.  She's one of those mums who took out private cover before even contemplating having another baby - and went private with her twins the second time, she still raves about the experience.

#40 Mozzie1

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:37 AM

I went public for exactly this reason - I didn't want intervention and thought I would be less likely to have it in a public hospital.

I ended up with an induction which failed, and an emergency c/s. the staff were busy so they didn't have time to answer all my questions and concerns, and I got bullied into being induced immediately because the hospital was too busy for the following 3 days, so I had no time to prepare. I felt like I had no say in what happened to me or my baby.

Next time I will go private.

#41 knottygirl

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:38 AM

QUOTE (TiredbutHappy @ 09/07/2013, 09:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Um, no.  My OB was present at my birth, he requested I ring the hospital when I was on my way.  He was there when I arrived for both my births, the first was at 5.30 am the second at 7.00 am.  I didn't have an epidural the first time as it was too quick, the second time, as soon as I requested pain relief the  anesthetist was there within 10 minutes - and that was only because it was an out of hours call out, otherwise he would have already been at the hospital.  Most OB's have their rooms on the grounds of the hospitals so are there during the day.  I'm not sure where you're getting your information from.  I love all the generalisations from people about private hospitals that have never given birth in one.


My obs was there too, the whole time.  Not in the room the whole time, but in the hospital.  He checked on me several times throughout the labour, and the midwife i had with me the whole time called him for the delivery, he was just in the next room.  During the day his office where he sees patients is attached to the hospital, so he gets called over when needed.  I have a couple times been in for appointments and had to wait or they have called me to move the appointment because he has had to go to the delivery room.  

The dr requested the epidural at midnight and the anaethatist was there within 20 mins.  He was the on call anaesthatist for that night.  There was none actually there, not even for the public patients.  The midwife told me at the time that they would not call in an anethatist for a public patient unless of an emergency because it costs the hospital too much money.

I went to the mater, which has a public part and a private part, as well as a NICU.

#42 Gumbette

Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:50 AM

QUOTE (MakeLoveNotBacon @ 09/07/2013, 09:42 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Don't high risk pregnancies end up in the large public hospitals anyway because they have all the equipment, etc?

I think it depends on whether the private hospital has an NICU department.  The private one I gave birth at does.  My girlfriend who gave birth at the same hospital had preeclampsia so her twins very premature and neither had to be transferred to a public hospital.

#43 MintyBiscuit

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:12 AM

The hospital where I had DS had pretty high stats when it came to interventions, but I should point out that it was never forced upon me. At my checkup at 40+3 my BP was high and my OB said I had a choice of induction or being admitted for monitoring until I went into labour naturally. It was entirely my choice at that point. My BP remained dodgy during labour, and I was told I might need an epidural if it started interfering with the baby's heart rate. Again, no forcefulness, and my choice after hearing all the pros and cons.

I've known people to have public births with plenty of choice and had wonderful experiences. I've known people who have literally nearly died due to shoddy care in public hospitals. I'm sure these also occur privately, but personally I've only ever heard and experienced good things in a private hospital, so for my birth it was the obvious choice.

As a PP mentioned, it's not just about the birth itself for a lot of people. I'm another one who wanted that time after the birth to recover and establish breastfeeding. I was a bit of an oddity in my hospital as I didn't want drugs and intervention, but that didn't mean I was pressured into anything or felt like I was causing problems for anyone. I took up a bed on the ward for two nights before going into labour and had constant monitoring, and never felt pressured to induce. Would I have had the same care and outcomes at a public hospital? Given the hospital I'm nearest to, definitely not.

#44 Datrys

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:28 AM

QUOTE (Wigglemama @ 09/07/2013, 09:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And for whoever said medical personnel don't care enough, I dare you to say that to any shift worker in a busy public hospital.


I can think of at least one I would say it to.  Fairly early in my pregnancy I was bleeding and my GP told me to go to emergency at x hospital.  Because it wasn't particularly near me, I rang ahead, told them what was happening and asked what I should bring etc (never done this before!)  The midwife on the phone was completely unhelpful, nasty and went on to berate me for not being up to date with my pap smears (because this is relevant how??).  If she cared, she certainly didn't have the slightest bit of skill to show it.  And now that I think about it, that phone call was part of what cemented my decision to go private; no way did I want more interactions like that!

QUOTE (JECJEC @ 09/07/2013, 09:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The crucial factor to me that your stats don't show is the post delivery care . Quite simply I don't believe that being put in a room with 3 other babies is an optimal post birth experience, nor is being sent within hours is ideal.


Yes, exactly.

QUOTE (MakeLoveNotBacon @ 09/07/2013, 10:08 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
IME, I think it would be highly unusual for them to throw someone out who wanted to stay longer.


I think of my SIL, leaving hospital the morning after a traumatic birth, still dizzy and unable to stand upright on her own; but they needed the bed.  Didn't inspire me to go public either.

It seems very likely that I'm about to spend the next four months as a pastoral carer to a public maternity ward; I'm going to be very interested to listen to all those mums and their experiences, and see whether they change my perceptions at all.

#45 tres-chic

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:29 AM

My public hospital experience in Sydney with DS1 was truly awful. In some ways I'll never get over it. I did come across some good midwives while I was there, but the level of care was just not there. The midwife that came on directly after DS1's birth (when I was totally traumatised) was the biggest b***h I've ever come across in my entire life.

In comparison my two, subsequent private hospital births were magical experiences.

I believe I was just unlucky but I would never go public if I could afford not to.

#46 Ritaroo

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:34 AM

QUOTE (mrsznasty @ 09/07/2013, 10:19 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As PPs have suggested though, I think it's more an issue with hospital versus hospital, rather than private vs public. People can have wonderful or terrible experiences in both systems.


I agree. It is a little like the public vs private school debate. There are some dodgy public schools around just as there are some wonderful public schools around and the same goes for private schools- some are wonderful and some are rubbish. I also think people are entitled to choose public or private without comment or judgement by other people. For what it is worth I decided to go private for this baby (my first) for many reasons - the private hospital nearest to us is in a bigger town so closer to my family and more accommodation options for them, I have private health so cost of the hospital stay isn't an issue and just the excitement and uncertainty of it all with my first baby made me want to go private. With the next one I will probably go to the public hospital in my town as a private patient as it will be hard to juggle work and a toddler while travelling to a town 70 kms away for the private hospital.

#47 glasnost

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:36 AM

I also think that it is highly dependent on the hospital.

I had my third baby in the public system and honestly, I could not have had a better experience. I went through a midwife group practice so maybe that influenced the care I received. I had my own midwife the whole way through, including post natal and she was so attentive and caring.

I wish it were the same Australia wide.

ETA I really liked sharing a room when I had my first baby. I found it reassuring to hear other new mums asking the same questions and going through the same things I was. There were always people coming and going. I think I would have felt a bit isolated and lonely if I were on my own. It was only for one night though, I think I would feel differently if it were 5 nights or 10 nights. The acoustic privacy would become a big issue.

Edited by glasnost, 09 July 2013 - 10:42 AM.


#48 liveworkplay

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:37 AM

QUOTE
However to state that the reason why women choose private health care is because most public hospitals give poor care( yes someone did state this in this thread when the op stated she had a great experience) is really unfair.


Why is it any more unfair then saying all private hospitals have high rates of intervention and push c/s? The public health system in this country is in crisis and has been for many years. That is not a reflection of the quality of health professionals that work within the system (I was one of them for over a decade), it is the system (and in a lot of cases the equipment/buildings etc) that they work within. Try accessing great public care in a regional city. I am in a capital city yet we have dozens of patients daily being forced to travel to Melbourne and Sydney just to get care in the public system. I am not talking about the odd knee reconstruction or cataract surgery (of which my local public hospital has the highest wait times in the country for) I'm talking about cancer patients, kids with leukemia, patients needing surgery to save their life.

An example from my own family: S was diagnosed with aggressive renal cancer with clots in his renal vein and vena cava. He also had the complication of having a stroke a few years earlier. He was refused care in the public system (tertiary teaching hospital) as he was classed as too risky because if the surgery had any complications  , they did not feel they had the facilities to handle it. So he was send to Melbourne. His partner obviously went with him. The doctors at the new hospital admitted him straight away as they were amazed that he had not dropped dead because of the clots. They paid his partner $65 a day allowance for her accommodation, food, transport etc. They were there for over 6 weeks.

How is this free public health care? The system is failing a lot of its patients.

(sorry a bit OTT but something that I am really angry about)

#49 Fright bat

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:39 AM

QUOTE (Pooks*potters @ 09/07/2013, 12:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You know, when you say it isn't "all" crap, it doesn't fill me with confidence.

Some of it is crap. Absolute bollocks.

I don't think public is crap. But sometimes it is. Often it seems to depend on the person you get looking after you in the lottery. Sometimes the overall culture of the hospital sucks the proverbial.

I don't think public often gives women enough choices. Actually I don't think there are enough choices overall.

Wanting continuity of care and control of birth choices (ie. elective caesarians, home birth) is seen as an optional extra that is reserved only for those who can afford private care/home birth. I disagree with that, I see it as a miserable failure on the part of the public system.

Public hospital staff can pat themselves on their backs all they like about how good *some* of them are... You know, depending where you live and which care team get assigned to you on the day...

But it doesn't change the fact that women are being denied choices, and some are getting substandard care, and told to be grateful for it.

Screw that for a joke.



I will defend to the death the capability of our public hospital system to deliver babies alive and with a living mum. And, in comparison to what happens around the world, this is absolutely something that shouldn't be forgotten in this whole discussion. Women and babies die at exorbitant rates - infant mortality in some part is 10%! Our infant mortality is minuscule, and maternal mortality is so rare that the couple a year make headlines.

Even the 'crap' hospitals you speak of, Pooks, get babies out alive. So the rest of this discussion should be in that context.

But is getting a baby out alive enough? Is that the ultimate we should aspire to? Personally, I'm vexed on this. Yes, we should be grateful for a living baby when women in poor parts of the world don't even get that.... But by the same token, that's cold comfort if you have experienced a traumatic birth. And recognising this, it doesn't actually cost THAT much to make small changes that mean women are happy with their births. Some public hospitals do this, some don't.

For me, this is what I see as the benefit of private. It's not about how the baby comes out - its about building a relationship with a trusted carer, about believing that you carer understands your needs and will work to achieve them (and thus accepting any required medical intervention) and being an active participant in birth choices. It's about being empowered, and being able to exercise that empowerment.

This is something that, by and large, happens well in private, and happens sometimes in some places in public.

The caveat to all this is that there are PLENTY of women who don't actually give a stuff about all this. They don't want to participate in 'birth choices' or make decisions. They come in, have a baby by any means necessary, and don't care. I'm not saying that they are better or worse than EBers who represent a particular subset of the population who generally care about such things.

At the end of the day - find a model of care that suits you. Everyone has individual needs. No statistic can tell you about the individuals behind that stat, or how it will apply to you.


#50 kpingitquiet

Posted 09 July 2013 - 10:42 AM

QUOTE (MakeLoveNotBacon @ 09/07/2013, 09:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I agree with you however that wasn't my experience.  They encourage early departure in the pre-admin stage but in reality I had to ask to leave.  Obviously if they had been busy, it might have been different.  Second time I was in birthing centre which had a 24 hour stay but they transferred us to the main hospital (on the same grounds) because ds had a skin condition they wanted to keep an eye on.  Again I had to ask to leave.  IME, I think it would be highly unusual for them to throw someone out who wanted to stay longer.  ETA I had a private room both times - perhaps just lucky.

Similar here in my major public hospital. Had I given birth as we began it we would've been allowed to stay in the extremely plush birthing suite for the first 24hrs, then could transfer to another room (some shared, some single) if I wished to stay longer. However, I wound up with an e-c/s after long labor so post-op was a private room with private bathroom where they encouraged me to stay for up to 5 days, but I hate hospitals so I pushed for early discharge which they supported with their home-care program. Now, I had some very negative experiences at the hospital but it was almost entirely down to two staffers (one midwife, one SCN nurse) who were exceptionally crappy. The hospital facilities were amazing and my surgery couldn't have been better and, despite my hatred of having strangers in my home in that way, the homecare programs are excellent.

I will say that it probably would've benefited me, overall to have had a more surgery-happy staff than what I had. And I understand why people who are more open to intervention, or anticipate needing it, might aim for private care...and that would skew the numbers.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

'My parenting style is Survivalist'

A helicopter or tiger mum, I am not.

8 mums reveal their favourite nappy bags

We asked a bunch of mums which nappy bags they love the most.

Why you shouldn't bother throwing a big first birthday party

If you're feeling the pressure to host an all-out, over-the-top shindig for your baby's birthday, I hereby grant you permission to throw the rules out the window.

The 24 baby names on the verge of extinction this year

If you're on the hunt for the perfect baby name and don't want a chart-topper like Oliver or Olivia, then do we have the list for you.

'My mum doesn't seem that interested in my baby'

Q: My mother and I have always been close, but now that I have a baby, she has not helped out as much as I thought she would.

New guidelines: "Bottle-feeding mums need support too"

Breast is best, but mums who can't, or choose not to breastfeed need support too.

Dads also struggle to 'have it all', study finds

Men and women both experience work-family conflict.

Language development may start in the womb

Study found babies can recognise foreign languages before birth.

Meet the baby born from an embryo frozen for 24 years

Experts say little Emma is a record breaking baby.

 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Articles

Advertisement
 
 
 

From our network

Five things you need to know about flu and pregnancy

As the 2017 flu season begins in earnest, here?s what you need to know to protect yourself and baby.

Mum tips to keep your pre-baby budget in check

Money might be funny in a rich man's world (or so ABBA told us), but for the rest of us it's a major consideration – particularly before having a baby.

5 easy ways to make your maternity leave last longer

Maternity leave is a special time for you, your partner and your new little bundle. The last thing you want is for financial worries to stand in the way of that joy.

10 ways to keep your 'buying for baby' costs down

Becoming a parent is full of surprises – not least of all finding out that, for such small beings, babies cause a lot of chaos and expense.

5 ways to prepare to go from two incomes to one

Here are some ideas for getting that budget in shape, ready for being a one income family.

 

Baby Names

Need some ideas?

See what names are trending this year.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.