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13 year racism taunt - afl
Old enough to know better?


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#1 Dr Dolly

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:17 PM

http://m.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/goodes...0525-2k7gj.html I was at the game last night and was 10 or so rows back from where this occurred.
The crowd immediately responded to this ugly taunt by booing until they were removed.
The message that this type of behaviour is clearly not tolerated is clearly getting through.
I think at 13, you know that this behaviour is unacceptable. The response from the crowd was so instant. Instant feedback and education for the girl.
Less than 5 minutes later, the crowd responded again to taunts by her friends who were also removed.
What a sad night for Adam Goode.



#2 my*xmas*kiddies

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:32 PM

Yep absoutley discusting. And the nerve of her to look 'shocked' when she was approached by the security. man.

Good job it was caught on camer, I hope she feels ashamed of herself.

#3 Lou-bags o tinsel

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:40 PM

Definitely old enough to know better. I'm glad she was called out on it by the crowd and that security acted appropriately.

I am, however, disappointed at some of the comments I have seen on fb and news stories etc, directed at the girl. They call her all kinds of horrible names and are, in my opinion, stooping just as low.
I can't believe those people don't see the hypocrisy! Grr.

#4 ali27

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:42 PM

Parents must be so proud!

#5 I am a shape

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:42 PM

Watching it this morning I also was wondering why she was escorted out alone. I assumed the lady sitting with her was her Mum, if so how disgusting to allow your child to be marched off through a booing crowd. It made me feel sorry for her.

#6 Lynken

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:47 PM

13 yrs is old enough to know that using that sort of language is not ok but I'm not sure she could have predicted the enormity of the outcome (effectively public shaming as even newsdotcomdotau are calling for people who were in the seats around or who know her).

I also wondered why she left by herself when I heard how old she was.  If her parents weren't there, where were her friends / friends parents / whoever she was there with?

#7 HurryUpAlready

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:47 PM

Absolutely old enough to know better, but too young to have her face splashed all over the tv/internet I think. I worry about the pressure that very public scrutiny & vilification puts a 13 year old under.

I think this is a great opportunity for her to be involved in a big discussion re racism, to give a (private) apology to the targeted player and to hopefully learn & grow from this experience.

She absolutely did the wrong thing but I don't think it should be played out in public any more than it already has been.  Hopefully this lesson has been learned.

Of course my comments above are assuming she is remorseful. If not, then maybe the public humiliation will teach her to keep her foul comments to herself at least.


As an aside, I'm wondering if she has grown up going to the footy with a parent who has displayed this type of behaviour and to the girl, it's standard "sledging". If so, I hope the whole family learns a big lesson from this experience.



#8 KT1978

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:47 PM

It must have been pretty awful, for the crowd and players to notice and retort, even with the usual noise and banter from the crowd going on.

Is it published exactly what was said?

#9 ~kacee~

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:49 PM

I saw Adam Goode on tv this morning, and thought he was very well spoken and respected what he said about it. He's a good spokesperson.

I think that what she said is probably more her parents speaking. At 13, I imagine she must be repeating what her parents may have yelled at the tv many times. The whole family needs to be educated.

13 is old enough to know better, but still young enough to be regurgitating what she has been moulded to think, which is not entirely her fault.

#10 Betty_D

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:51 PM

I'm torn on this one.

There's absolutely no excuse for racism, at any age. It was right that she was removed from the stadium and I hope she's learnt a valuable lesson.

But, a tiny part of me does feel for her. She is only 13. She not only felt the anger of an entire stadium, but a nation of viewers who saw it happen. It's all over twitter, youtube, facebook etc. Some of the things I've read on my newsfeed today, about a 13 year old girl, are almost as abhorrent as her original comment.

And I also think her parents have a lot to answer for. Was that her mother sitting next to her?

#11 ~Supernova~

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:51 PM

I the article it says she called him an ape...how is this racist? I'm assuming other things must have been said - surely.

#12 my*xmas*kiddies

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:51 PM

So because shes 13 she should be treated differently to how an adult would have been?

Edited by my*sweet*kiddies, 25 May 2013 - 12:55 PM.


#13 snortle

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:54 PM

--

Edited by snortle, 20 May 2014 - 07:23 PM.


#14 ~Supernova~

Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:57 PM

QUOTE (snortle @ 25/05/2013, 01:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was wondering this also?
I've never called anyone an ape but I suppose if someone was really hairy I might use it as an insult if nothing better came to mind. Never knew it was a racist thing?


My husband just told me it's a comment people make to dark people to be derogatory. I must live a sheltered life, because I would have just assumed the person was hairy. Still an insult, but not racist (in the way I think of it).

#15 Betty_D

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:00 PM

QUOTE (my*sweet*kiddies @ 25/05/2013, 01:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So because shes 13 she should be treated differently to how an adult would have been?



I think the media should have treated her differently, yes. Her photo is splashed across most major news sites. The Age has only now blurred the image to cover her up.

Of course there should be consequences to her actions. She was ejected from the grounds and interrogated by police. But I do disagree with the public crucifying.

#16 KT1978

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:02 PM

I think the phrase ape is racist because it infers inferiority, less evolved, animal etc etc. PP. It might also refer to appearance. I don't know the full history though.

A child may not know that. Given the way kids call each other names like piggy etc it could have just been inadvertently racist. And I think if that's all that was said it would be lost in the noise and maybe a few people around might have said cut it out. The reaction makes me think she said more and it was deliberately racist?

I think the phrase ape is racist because it infers inferiority, less evolved, animal etc etc. PP. It might also refer to appearance. I don't know the full history though.

A child may not know that. Given the way kids call each other names like piggy etc it could have just been inadvertently racist. And I think if that's all that was said it would be lost in the noise and maybe a few people around might have said cut it out. The reaction makes me think she said more and it was deliberately racist?

#17 Sassy Dingo

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:02 PM

QUOTE (~Supernova~ @ 25/05/2013, 12:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My husband just told me it's a comment people make to dark people to be derogatory. I must live a sheltered life, because I would have just assumed the person was hairy. Still an insult, but not racist (in the way I think of it).


It is racist as it is implying that any dark skinned person is not as evolved as a white person.

#18 opethmum

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:03 PM

I think that the girl concerned has paid a high price of her racist comment. I think that at her age that she should have known better and that she needs to make amends privately to AG not on the world stage.

I think AG handled it well and last night proves that more needs to be done in stamping out racism and abuse in general.

I think that the AFL has handled it with class and that they have done an outstanding job.

#19 ali27

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:03 PM

QUOTE
My husband just told me it's a comment people make to dark people to be
derogatory. I must live a sheltered life, because I would have just assumed the
person was hairy. Still an insult, but not racist (in the way I think of it).


Yes this is correct. Goes back to the times when people suggested that black people were "less evolved" than white people, therefore more like apes.

A very offensive suggestion, obviously.

Not a great way to begin the indigenous round of footy.

#20 HRH Countrymel

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:04 PM

QUOTE (~Supernova~ @ 25/05/2013, 12:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My husband just told me it's a comment people make to dark people to be derogatory. I must live a sheltered life, because I would have just assumed the person was hairy. Still an insult, but not racist (in the way I think of it).



Google it.  You really have led a sheltered life. There is a long, long revolting history of this being used as an insult.  I'm sure you will find thousands of Obama related 'jokes' just as a starter.

I'm loathe to put some of the terms here and I'm sure as hell not going to add links.


Adam Goodes has always struck me as a measured speaker and a great ambassador for his club and his sport, the disappointment of this happening in the opening game of the indigenous round is immense.

The fact that the friend repeated the behaviour soon after speaks volumes for 'lesson learned' though.

#21 snortle

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:08 PM

--

Edited by snortle, 20 May 2014 - 07:23 PM.


#22 my*xmas*kiddies

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE (countrymel @ 25/05/2013, 01:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Google it.  You really have led a sheltered life. There is a long, long revolting history of this being used as an insult.  I'm sure you will find thousands of Obama related 'jokes' just as a starter.

I'm loathe to put some of the terms here and I'm sure as hell not going to add links.


Adam Goodes has always struck me as a measured speaker and a great ambassador for his club and his sport, the disappointment of this happening in the opening game of the indigenous round is immense.

The fact that the friend repeated the behaviour soon after speaks volumes for 'lesson learned' though.


This

#23 Black Velvet

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

Of course a thirteen year old is old enough to know what she is saying. If it were my child I would be ashamed of that behaviour. But, I would have walked out with her and not left her to face that humiliation by herself.

I also think she does not deserve a public flogging like she is now receiving. Education about racism, yes, but I think this carry on is going too far with some one of that age.

#24 HRH Countrymel

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:16 PM

Actually this is a good time to post this iconic photograph from 1993 - Nicky Winmar responds to Collingwood supporters racial vilification..



#25 **pk**

Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:23 PM

Hey OP, can you clarify - did her friends/family ALSO say racist comments after the girl was marched out and then they were marched out too?

Unforgivable in that case. I hope they're memberships are cancelled.




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