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Should he have to pull it up?
Astroturf


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#1 Wraith

Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:59 AM

This guy has put down some Astro turf on the verge in front of his house and Council are making him pull it up.

Is it a matter of council not liking it or do they have a valid reason?


#2 maurie

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:09 AM

I'm thinking it's because of access to services under the naturestrip.   Is Astroturf hard to remove?  

Some people in my area plant gardens on their naturestrip and if Council/Water/Elec/Gas need to access their pipes they only replace the dirt and put down grass seed - they won't replace the plants.

Edited by maurie, 28 February 2013 - 08:09 AM.


#3 newphase

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:12 AM

The council  said it is because it is a possible tripping hazard!

#4 emlis22

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:17 AM

He doesn't own the land, so he can't just do what he wants with it. That's the bottom line. People who disregard rules and then complain irk me.

Edited by emlis22, 28 February 2013 - 08:17 AM.


#5 JRA

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:22 AM

this is a really difficult one, sure he doesn't own the land, but it is his responsibility to keep it maintained.

This is a real contradiction, and has been forever.

Our council has the same rule, but many have put it down, and council seem to have ignored this, and often don't realise. The next door council are putting it down themselves in median strips and such

To say it is tripping hazard, when it is the grass bit, is ridiculous. Grass itself is uneven and often unkept and definitely a tripping hazard. Many footpaths are worse with tree roots causing issues.

#6 Wraith

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:26 AM

QUOTE (emlis22 @ 28/02/2013, 08:17 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
He doesn't own the land, so he can't just do what he wants with it. That's the bottom line. People who disregard rules and then complain irk me.

Yes but council would say something if he didn't maintain it. Astro turf is a viable, water friendly option.


QUOTE (JRA @ 28/02/2013, 08:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
this is a really difficult one, sure he doesn't own the land, but it is his responsibility to keep it maintained.

This is a real contradiction, and has been forever.

Our council has the same rule, but many have put it down, and council seem to have ignored this, and often don't realise. The next door council are putting it down themselves in median strips and such

To say it is tripping hazard, when it is the grass bit, is ridiculous. Grass itself is uneven and often unkept and definitely a tripping hazard. Many footpaths are worse with tree roots causing issues.

Exactly.

If I could afford it I would replace my front yard with Astro Turf. No mowing, easy to maintain etc.

#7 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:45 AM

I think it is a great idea.  Will keep that in mind for our footpath.

QUOTE (JRA @ 28/02/2013, 08:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
To say it is tripping hazard, when it is the grass bit, is ridiculous. Grass itself is uneven and often unkept and definitely a tripping hazard. Many footpaths are worse with tree roots causing issues.

Very true.

I think someone on council made a decision on this situation without thinking it through.  In reality, the astro turf isn't going to present any more of a trip hazard than grass (particularly grass that is not regularly mowed and cared for), tree roots, or cracked footpaths .....

Provided services can be accessed and it is kept neat and tidy, I don't see the problem.  Best thing is that the astro turf can be easily put back after services have been accessed and you'd never know the difference.  Unlike when gardens or turf has been torn up for service access, it can take a while for recovery.


#8 MarigoldMadge

Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:52 AM

I don't think having an astro turf front lawn would be the go - I've read about how much heat they generate and retain on hot days, so I assume they would actually help to heat up surrounding buildings.

I don't know why the council went with the safety angle, I would think they would have more traction with environmental concerns. Nature strips play in role in filtering run off, water tables etc, and also, having lived in Darebin, that part of Melbourne suffers from a lack of urban nature. There are lots of streets without any trees/nature strips etc.

Plus the precedent - I wouldn't want to live in a street full of fake nature strips - there are plenty of councils across Australia that have banned astro turf for nature strips, so the problem might be that Darebin weren't pro-active about this, and banned before residents started putting it in.

#9 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:00 AM

QUOTE (haras1972 @ 28/02/2013, 08:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think having an astro turf front lawn would be the go - I've read about how much heat they generate and retain on hot days, so I assume they would actually help to heat up surrounding buildings.

I don't think he has used a massive strip of astro turf though.  It looks to be about 1-2 foot wide and the length of the house frontage (maybe 15m??).  It's basically the same size as the concrete footpath it's next to.  I don't think it's going to a create a major heat hazard.

It's still green and soft.  Better than a full concrete path.

#10 MarigoldMadge

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:04 AM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 28/02/2013, 10:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think he has used a massive strip of astro turf though.  It looks to be about 1-2 foot wide and the length of the house frontage (maybe 15m??).  It's basically the same size as the concrete footpath it's next to.  I don't think it's going to a create a major heat hazard.

It's still green and soft.  Better than a full concrete path.


Sorry, should have quoted - I was referring to a PP wishing they could astro turf their entire front yard...

#11 lamarque

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:09 AM

QUOTE (newphase @ 28/02/2013, 09:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The council  said it is because it is a possible tripping hazard!

Of course it is a tripping hazard!  My in-laws have some out the back and it's forever moving and getting scrunched by people walking on it.   It's not his property so he should remove it.  

LOL at his neighbour's grass coming up to his crotch though.  That was funny.

ETA - I disagree grass is a tripping hazard.  Tree roots under grass and footpaths - yes.  It is the responsibility of council to fix paths etc once they are aware of the issue.  Not sure how it works in VIC but in NSW at least once councils are aware of a possible tripping hazard, they must act.  If they're not aware and you trip, it's your fault.

Edited by lamarque, 28 February 2013 - 09:16 AM.


#12 Phascogale

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:11 AM

There's an estate where I used to live where the developers had put in fake grass on the nature strips of all the houses that were display homes in that street.  It stayed there when the houses were sold.  So an entire street, not just one house!

I have to admit that a few years down the track, that it doesn't look fabulous.  The colour and texture probably weren't that great a choice in the beginning but there are a lot of weeds growing up on top where small amounts of dirt have accumulated and often at the edges.  So you do have to do some level of maintenance.  These homes are now 5/6 years old.

It can look good.  My old family day carers front garden had a small amount that looked great.  It was small and difficult to get a lawnmower to so this was their solution.

Actually my PIL are putting some in at their new place for maintenance reasons as they are getting older and don't want to be mowing their lawns all the time.

#13 BadCat

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:15 AM

QUOTE (haras1972 @ 28/02/2013, 09:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't think having an astro turf front lawn would be the go - I've read about how much heat they generate and retain on hot days, so I assume they would actually help to heat up surrounding buildings.

I don't know why the council went with the safety angle, I would think they would have more traction with environmental concerns. Nature strips play in role in filtering run off, water tables etc, and also, having lived in Darebin, that part of Melbourne suffers from a lack of urban nature. There are lots of streets without any trees/nature strips etc.

Plus the precedent - I wouldn't want to live in a street full of fake nature strips - there are plenty of councils across Australia that have banned astro turf for nature strips, so the problem might be that Darebin weren't pro-active about this, and banned before residents started putting it in.


I agree with this.

I hate that people are replacing nature with artificial nature.  It doesn't sit well with me at all.

Plus, fake turf is ugly.

#14 Puggle

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:20 AM

Maybe Darebin Council should talk to Penrith City Council in NSW - they've installed astroturf on the nature strip on Mulgoa Road under the M4 motorway bridge.

It's interesting to see how different councils approach these issues. I can see how people/council would object to astroturf on a suburban nature strip.

Edited by Puggle, 28 February 2013 - 09:24 AM.


#15 katpaws

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:34 AM

Quite a few houses in Brighton (Vic) have fake turf on the nature strips.

LOL about the tripping issue. The nature strip outside our house developed a metre deep (at least)  40cm wide hole which was extremely dangerous and the local council refused to fix it. They told us it was our nature strip and up to us to fix it. They tried to say legislation proved that the nature strip was ours to maintain, but somehow could not show where this was written and even quoting their webpage where they said they were responsible for nature strip maintanence got nowhere. Our local councillor eventually got them to fix it.



#16 ComradeBob

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:38 AM

They're covering their arses in case someone takes action against council for tripping over astroturf and injuring themselves. Plus I guess they'd be worried about the precedent and issues of stormwater if larger sections of the area got covered.

#17 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:42 AM

QUOTE (WingBob @ 28/02/2013, 09:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They're covering their arses in case someone takes action against council for tripping over astroturf and injuring themselves. Plus I guess they'd be worried about the precedent and issues of stormwater if larger sections of the area got covered.

true.  The same as if someone tripped over regular grass on the verge and hurt themself.  This way the council can say "We didn't do it, it's not our problem."

That can't do that with footpaths, gutters, etc - they install them, their responsibility to maintain them.

#18 lamarque

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:42 AM

QUOTE (katpaws @ 28/02/2013, 10:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Quite a few houses in Brighton (Vic) have fake turf on the nature strips.

LOL about the tripping issue. The nature strip outside our house developed a metre deep (at least)  40cm wide hole which was extremely dangerous and the local council refused to fix it. They told us it was our nature strip and up to us to fix it. They tried to say legislation proved that the nature strip was ours to maintain, but somehow could not show where this was written and even quoting their webpage where they said they were responsible for nature strip maintanence got nowhere. Our local councillor eventually got them to fix it.

Wow!  Glad some common sense prevailed there.  

QUOTE (WingBob @ 28/02/2013, 10:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They're covering their arses in case someone takes action against council for tripping over astroturf and injuring themselves. Plus I guess they'd be worried about the precedent and issues of stormwater if larger sections of the area got covered.

Exactly.  If someone trips and sues the council, they will issue a cross claim against the owner.  


#19 maxshim

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:49 AM

From a purely aesthetic point of view I would rather live near houses that had a nice, neat fake grass nature strip than ones that had completely overgrown natural ones.  A house down the road from us was sold not that long ago and the people who bought it started some major renovations and now seem to have disappeared completely.  The entire house is now a hovel with all lawns, including the nature strip completely overgrown.  A neighbor rang the council to prompt them to do something about it and they replied with "We'll send a letter to them telling them to mow it".  Well, that would be great if anyone actually lived there!!  It's a disaster and far more of a safety issue than the "tripping hazard" of turf I think.  

Anyway - clearly that's my personal opinion and not everyone would agree.

#20 sne

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:02 AM

There's a house in a street near ours where the occupants have dug out the nature strip and replaced it with a brown coloured gravel shaped/sized stone.  We're not in Darebin but the next council over from it.

#21 JRA

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:14 AM

QUOTE (lamarque @ 28/02/2013, 09:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Of course it is a tripping hazard!  My in-laws have some out the back and it's forever moving and getting scrunched by people walking on it.   It's not his property so he should remove it.  

LOL at his neighbour's grass coming up to his crotch though.  That was funny.

ETA - I disagree grass is a tripping hazard.  Tree roots under grass and footpaths - yes.  It is the responsibility of council to fix paths etc once they are aware of the issue.  Not sure how it works in VIC but in NSW at least once councils are aware of a possible tripping hazard, they must act.  If they're not aware and you trip, it's your fault.


We have fake grass, not on the nature strip. I am not sure what your parents have done wrong, but I have no idea how it is a tripping hazard. All the schools that have created sporting fields with this would also have a problem, our $750K new hockey field would also have a problem.  Your parents have obviously done it very wrong.

Sure grass it not a tripping hazard, if it is maintained, there are no tree roots etc etc. But how often does that happen.



#22 witchesforest

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:23 AM

he he, that's just round the corner from our place. every time we walk past it my DD talks about the 'fake grass' at the top of her voice. she is fascinated by it.

#23 laridae

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:26 AM

QUOTE (JRA @ 28/02/2013, 09:22 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
this is a really difficult one, sure he doesn't own the land, but it is his responsibility to keep it maintained.



Is it?  Our council mows the nature strips...  some people do as well, but most of them don't.

#24 FeralMinx

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:29 AM

I remember a few years ago when I lived near kalgoorlie, the council actually put astroturf down themselves, on various median strips and so on.

#25 lucky 2

Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:39 AM

The council is not saying what I think they really want to say, ie instead of saying we don't want you to have fake grass because it is fake and not in keeping with the look of the neighbourhood, they make out it is a tripping hazard when you could easily trip on a "small garden" on the nature strip.
Doesn't anyone call a spade a spade anymore?




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